Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - January 2021 (ALL: 01/05/2021 - 02/05/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1101 AMST-267-90 Unearthing Local Histories 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: HIST-267-90
  We live in interesting times. This course invites you to explore an interesting moment either in the past or present in your home town (or wherever you are currently), and create a document that explores it from a local perspective. Using interviews, local newspapers and other available materials, you'll be constructing the story, rather than simply reporting it. The course will move you through each stage of the process, with the end product intended (if possible) to be a public, online document others can learn from.
1095 AMST-445-90 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-845-90, ENGL-845-90
  NOTE: This course is open to graduate and advanced undergraduates in English or American Studies, or by permission from the instructor.
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
1079 AMST-845-90 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-445-90, ENGL-845-90
  NOTE: This course is open to graduate and advanced undergraduates in English or American Studies, or by permission from the instructor.
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
1002 ANTH-207-90 Anth Persp Women & Gender 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, INTS, LATINAMER, WMGS
  Using texts and films, this course will explore the nature of women’s lives in both the contemporary United States and a number of radically different societies around the world, including, for example, the !Kung San people of the Kalahari and the Mundurucù of Amazonian Brazil. As they examine the place of women in these societies, students will also be introduced to theoretical perspectives that help explain both variations in women’s status from society to society and "universal" aspects of their status.
1019 ANTH-222-90 Voodoo, Zombies, Conjured Dead 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: RELG-222-90
  This course focuses on those religious traditions known collectively as “Voodoo.” By examining powerful displays of spirit possession, rituals in which the ancestors raise from their graves to dance, and secretive ceremonies from which social criminals become walking zombies, students will explore the lived experiences of Voodoo practitioners from around the world. We will juxtapose Western imaginations and fantasies of Voodoo to the real-lived experiences of practitioners. In so doing, students will learn how, despite racial stereotyping and anti-Africa sentiments around the globe, Voodoo has become one of the world’s fastest growing global religions. Along with rich ethnographic texts, throughout the course students will engage with critical-race theory, theories of globalization, transnationalism, diaspora, and urban religious expansion.
1093 ANTH-303-90 Urban China 1.00 SEM Notar, Beth TWRF: 8:00AM-9:40AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  What does it mean to live in one of the fastest growing cities in the fastest growing economy in the world? This course focuses on understanding the complex and ongoing transformations of Chinese cities, examining such topics as contestations over the urban environment and “public” space, the rise of China’s new middle class, new consumption patterns, rural to urban migration, and spaces of youth culture. Course materials will include ethnographies, journal and newspaper articles as well as documentary and feature film clips
1086 BIOL-121-90 Human Health and Nutrition 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course will focus on basic human physiology and nutrition related to human health. We will examine organ systems, such as cardiovascular, kidney and liver, and explore how diet influences their function, susceptibility to chronic disease and longevity. We will discuss the standard American diet, other dietary philosophies and diet fads and explore the scientific literature to determine their effects on long term health. The course will consist of short weekly zoom sessions, short recorded lectures, exploratory assignments, food preparation and tasting challenges, and written work. All levels of college science background are welcome. Not creditable to the Biology major.
1097 BIOL-124-90 Genes and Human Disease 1.00 LEC Fournier, Claire TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  A lecture course to investigate the role of genetics in human disease. Through readings, lectures, and discussions we will address how variation in one’s genome can cause monogenic diseases as well as complex conditions such as cancer and diabetes. We will begin with an understanding of the DNA that makes up our genes and then look at physical manifestations that result when gene sequence and function is altered. Not creditable to the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology.
1120 BIOL-218-90 Plants of New England 1.00 LEC Miller, Kate TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L, or permission of instructor.
  Students will become familiar with diverse plant communities of various New England ecosystems. Fundamentals of plant structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology and evolution will be applied to studies of key native species. We will also explore community interactions, the role and impact of disturbance, invasive species and strategies in conservation. Coursework will include independent field assignments. Pre-requisite: C or better in BIOL 182 and 183, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the Group I requirement for the biology major.
1110 BIOL-310-90 Developmental Biology Lecture 1.00 LEC Fleming, Robert TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L or Biology 183L, or permission of instructor.
  A study of the developmental processes in animals with emphasis on vertebrates. Modern theories of development are emphasized.
1085 BIOL-432-90 Nutrition and Brain Health 1.00 SEM Guardiola-Diaz, Hebe TWRF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: NESC-432-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L or Biology 183L, and C- or better in Biology 227L or BIOL 317L, or Neuroscience 201, or permission of instructor
  An exploration of the critical role of the brain in the regulation of food intake and of the effect of dietary nutrients in brain function. This seminar will highlight metabolic requirements for optimal brain health and will critique nutritional approaches to manage neurological disorders. Students will analyze, discuss and present relevant literature in physiology, cellular and molecular biology, and neuroscience. This seminar meets the Writing Emphasis 2 requirements in the biology and neuroscience major.
1081 CHEM-111-90 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Brindle, Cheyenne TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
1140 COLL-209-90 Future European Union/Brexit 1.00 SEM Lefebvre, Thomas TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The outcome of the referendum held in the United Kingdom on June 23, 2016 in which British citizens decided to leave the European Union (EU), commonly referred to as Brexit, has far reaching economical and political consequences. This course will offer students the opportunity to engage with the ongoing debate over the future of the European Union following this vote. The course will introduce students to current debates on institutions, public opinion, economy, security, and transatlantic relationship.
1035 CPSC-415-90 Special Topics: Sensitive Info 1.00 LEC Syta, Ewa TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 203, 215L and 275L
  Increasing use of computers in business, government, recreation, and almost all aspects of daily life has led to a proliferation of sensitive data that is collected, stored, and used by today's ubiquitous information systems. Consequently, concern about the ownership, control, privacy, and accuracy of these data has become a top priority. This course will explore the powers and the limitations of the existing privacy-enhancing technologies with a focus on the technical challenges of handling sensitive information as well as the corresponding legal, social, economic, and policy issues. Special attention will be paid to the recent advances and new perspectives on research in privacy technologies.
1049 ECON-218-90 Intro to Stats for Econ 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 or permission of instructor.
  As data and computing resources have become increasingly accessible, economics has become more concerned with measurement and estimation of economic phenomena. This course is designed to familiarize students with common statistical methods used in economics. Topics will include the presentation of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.
1050 ECON-224-90 Macroeconomics and Inequality 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  US economic inequality is at record levels and is substantially greater than inequality in most other industrialized nations. This course develops key aspects of the inequality debate: how economic inequality is defined and measured, as well as the causes of income inequality in US economy and society. Topics covered will also include the macroeconomic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and it's impact on the level of inequality.
1051 ECON-252-90 Big Data and Economics 1.00 LEC Jogani, Chitra WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  With the rise of the internet, social media, and technology, there has been a shift in the availability and the power of data. Economists now have access to "big data" that can play a role in increasing economic activity and living standards. Examples include the development of new goods and services and faster innovation through a shorter research and development cycle, as a result of more and better data. Other benefits could affect our quality of life: fewer traffic jams and easier price comparisons. This course explores both the ways that "big data" has changed our understanding of the economy as well as the ethical issues related to the collection and use of these data.
1052 ECON-306-90 Public Finance 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  An examination of the role of tax and public expenditure policies as they influence the allocation and distribution of resources, and on the role of market imperfections as rationales for government policies. Emphasis is on the effects of taxation and public spending on consumer and producer choices.
1053 ECON-318-90 Basic Econometrics 1.00 LEC Stater, Mark TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  NOTE: For students who took Econ 218 in spring 2020 the prerequisite will be a P or a C- or above.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. The computer will be used but no experience is necessary.
  View syllabus
1054 ECON-342-90 Macro since 07-08 Fin. Crisis 1.00 LEC Bent, Peter TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course explores the problems that have faced macroeconomics specifically since the 2007-08 financial crisis. Some economists reacted to that crisis by calling for a complete overhaul of the discipline, while others were satisfied with more cosmetic changes. For this course we will use the book Evolution or Revolution? Rethinking Macroeconomic Policy after the Great Recession (Blanchard and Summers) as a baseline for analyzing in great depth how macroeconomic thinking and practice has changed over the past decade. This will include an analysis of how policy makers reacted to the crisis and how that in turn has impacted macroeconomic research.
1147 ECON-431-90 Policy Innov & COVID-19 1.00 LEC Clark, Carol WF: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  How have advanced economies, such as the U.S., Germany and Australia, responded to the economic shocks created by the coronavirus? Have some national policies proven to be more successful than others, and if so, why? The many "real-time" experiments in policy design and execution have sparked lively debates. For example, would consumer demand be better maintained by boosting workers' unemployment payments, or would paying businesses directly to maintain their payrolls be the best way to go? What happens when the Fed expands its loan policies to include not only banks, but also corporations, small businesses, and local government? This seminar will explore these questions and consider the pros and cons of macroeconomic policies engineered by Congress, the executive branch, and other governments around the world.
1106 ECON-431-90 Slavery & American Capitalism 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  A major, and unexpected, recent development in the US is the degree to which the American public is becoming aware of the experiences of African Americans in the US economy, experiences with roots in slavery. What was slavery's role in the development and evolution of our economy? We will explore how the system of slavery was central to the development of our own financial system, to our participation in the 19th century global economy, to the accumulation of enormous wealth in both the southern and the northern states and finally, how this history continues to play an important role in our modern day economy by examining the new scholarship on American economic development, primary materials from museums, libraries and newspaper archives, and first-person accounts.
1107 ECON-431-91 Slavery & American Capitalism 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  A major, and unexpected, recent development in the US is the degree to which the American public is becoming aware of the experiences of African Americans in the US economy, experiences with roots in slavery. What was slavery's role in the development and evolution of our economy? We will explore how the system of slavery was central to the development of our own financial system, to our participation in the 19th century global economy, to the accumulation of enormous wealth in both the southern and the northern states and finally, how this history continues to play an important role in our modern day economy by examining the new scholarship on American economic development, primary materials from museums, libraries and newspaper archives, and first-person accounts.
1148 ECON-431-91 Policy Innov & COVID-19 1.00 LEC Zannoni, Diane WF: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  How have advanced economies, such as the U.S., Germany and Australia, responded to the economic shocks created by the coronavirus? Have some national policies proven to be more successful than others, and if so, why? The many "real-time" experiments in policy design and execution have sparked lively debates. For example, would consumer demand be better maintained by boosting workers' unemployment payments, or would paying businesses directly to maintain their payrolls be the best way to go? What happens when the Fed expands its loan policies to include not only banks, but also corporations, small businesses, and local government? This seminar will explore these questions and consider the pros and cons of macroeconomic policies engineered by Congress, the executive branch, and other governments around the world.
1074 ENGL-270-90 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Ferriss, Lucy TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 3 seats are reserved for juniors, 5 seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 2 seats for incoming InterArts first year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1075 ENGL-270-91 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini, Clare WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 3 seats are reserved for juniors, 5 seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 2 seats for incoming InterArts first year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1089 ENGL-298-90 Fairy Tales 1.00 LEC Bilston, Sarah WF: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  For centuries, fairy tales have brought comfort, connection, and solace. At once magical and escapist, they offer avenues for self-reflection and practical lessons in managing life's challenges. This course examines both fairy tales and the scholarship devoted to understanding the genre. We will read tales written hundreds of years ago, from all over the world, together with contemporary rewritings, revisions, and repurposings in film, fiction, and poetry. We will read scholarly works that, using a range of critical methodologies, seek to identify what fairy tales offer and how they are structured. And we will work to produce both analytical essays and a creative intervention in the tradition: students will have the opportunity, at the end of the course, to write their own fairy tale.
1076 ENGL-322-90 What Is Romanticism? 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  The Romantic era accounts for little over forty years of British literary history (roughly 1789-1832). Yet in spite of its short duration, it has had an out-sized effect on conceptions of what makes good and important literature. This course explores the distinctive genres, contentious relationships, and political obsessions of the Romantic period. From newly self-interrogating poetry to the rise of the Gothic novel, from the fight to end slavery to battles over the place of women and the poor, Romantic-era writers fanned the flames of change. We will explore what parts of their aesthetic and political legacy we want to embrace, and what parts we want to remember but rebuff. Authors include Jane Austen, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Mary Shelley, and William Wordsworth, among others.
1073 ENGL-366-90 Jane Austen:A Culture inCrisis 1.00 SEM Benedict, Barbara TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Jane Austen is unique in the pantheon of British writers: her novels remain among the most studied and the most beloved by both popular and academic readers across the globe. Why? How does she bridge these very different audiences? In this course, we will answer these questions by reading her complete opus, plus critical and biographical studies of her life and fiction. Students will explore her unique style, her blend of romance and cultural criticism, of feminism and conventionality, and the divergent (sometimes vehement) interpretations of her ideas, beliefs and aims through class discussion and research. This course satisfies the requirement of a Research Seminar and an upper-level course covering literature from 1700-1900 for the English major.
1077 ENGL-445-90 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-445-90, AMST-845-90
  NOTE: This course is open to graduate and advanced undergraduates in English or American Studies, or by permission from the instructor.
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
1080 ENGL-491-90 CW Thesis Part 1/Colloquium 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors concentrating in Creative Writing the techniques to successfully undertake a semester-long creative project in the genre of their choice. It is intended to help the students develop the habits-of-arts required to write such theses and to provide a forum for feedback during the early stages of composition. In this course we will address issues of drafting and revision, developing a booklist, the use of research in creative work, and, finally, establishing structural and thematic coherence in a novel excerpt, poetry collection, suite of stories, one-act play, and/or screenplay. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write one-semester, creative writing theses.
1078 ENGL-845-90 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-445-90, AMST-845-90
  NOTE: This course is open to graduate and advanced undergraduates in English or American Studies, or by permission from the instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement.
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
1121 ENGR-366-90 Architectural Design Studio 0.50 STU Duncan, David W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: AHIS-366-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 341.
  This course is ideal for students interested in an architectural design/portfolio development studio format and is a continuation of AHIS 365. Students will complete an architectural design project of their choice with weekly online meetings and studio critiques with the instructor. These Zoom meetings will include the entire class, allowing students the benefit of seeing and participating in what others are working on.
1082 ENVS-110-90 The Earth's Climate 1.00 LEC Geiss, Christoph TWRF: 8:00AM-9:40AM N/A Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 48 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first years, 7 for sophomores and 7 for juniors.
  The course will introduce students to techniques that quantify past and present climates and present a history of the earth’s climate throughout geologic time. We will discuss past and future climate change, its potential causes and effects on society.
1125 ENVS-110-91 The Earth's Climate 1.00 LEC Geiss, Christoph TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 48 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: Course open to first-year students or by instructor permission.
  The course will introduce students to techniques that quantify past and present climates and present a history of the earth’s climate throughout geologic time. We will discuss past and future climate change, its potential causes and effects on society.
1083 ENVS-286-90 Theory&Appl of Geograph Info S 1.00 LEC Gourley, Jonathan TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  A lecture/lab course that focuses on the theory and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) using the ESRI ArcGIS software package. ArcGIS is a powerful mapping tool that facilitates the compilation, analysis and presentation of spatial data for a wide variety of disciplines including the natural and social sciences and any other field that uses spatial data. This course will provide students with the fundamental skills needed to design and manage digital databases and map sets so that they may integrate GIS into future courses, research, or careers. Topics include basic and advanced navigation and functionality within the ArcGIS workspace; database management and querying; and methods of data acquisition for GIS project building. Class projects on lab computers will be an integral component of the course and will be tailored to the specific interests and goals of individual students. This course does not meet the natural science distribution requirement.
1152 FORG-201-90 Form Org & Mkt Behavior 1.00 SEM Thomas, Signe TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course will consider the likely behavior within Formal Organizations using the benchmark of economic thinking and market mechanisms. The course will discuss the role of prices, property, and profit and loss in a market economy, and it will ponder to what extent such arrangements might be applied within firms. It will discuss potential problems of organization when concerns for opportunity cost, economic calculation, or entrepreneurial thinking are lacking. Students will read classic and modern economic texts and then read business case studies to explore when and where the lessons of economics might apply.
1153 FORG-226-90 Entrepreneurship and Society 1.00 SEM Thomas, Signe TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The course analyzes social entrepreneurship and evaluates its special role in meeting human needs and solving societal problems. The course compares and contrasts social entrepreneurship to two other kinds of organizations: traditional kinds of not-for-profit organizations, and for-profit firms. The course provides a systematic account of motivations and behaviors in social entrepreneurship and in social enterprises. The course assesses a variety of theories of social entrepreneurship. The course draws on historical and institutional examples throughout and has a strong emphasis on urban and global issues.
1087 HIST-220-90 Possible Earths 1.00 SEM Cocco, Sean TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This seminar examines environmental thinking across histories and cultures in order to retrieve sources of hope and wisdom for a planetary future. Reading and discussion will foreground current humanity's vast inheritance when it comes to ways of existing in community with and knowing a living planet. Students will look critically at how texts, images, objects, and practices are historical evidence of the many ways humans have imagined natural communities and acted within them.
1099 HIST-259-90 Latinx Urban Activism 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: URST-259-90
  NOTE: Seats reserved: 8 First-Year Students, 7 Sophomores, and 6 Juniors.
  We will examine the emergence and evolution of urban political activism by Latinas and Latinos in the United States from the early 1900s to the present. We will begin with the impact of U.S. imperial expansion and colonialism (1848-present), and then track the emergence of Pan-Latinx identities and political coalitions between Latinx, African Americans, and other ethnic groups. Topics include urban political manifestations of the following: civil rights movements, labor and student movements, struggles for gender and sexual liberation, immigration policies, citizenship, voting rights, electoral representation, cultural citizenship, urban renewal, gentrification, and "the right to the city."
1098 HIST-267-90 Unearthing Local Histories 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: AMST-267-90
  We live in interesting times. This course invites you to explore an interesting moment either in the past or present in your home town (or wherever you are currently), and create a document that explores it from a local perspective. Using interviews, local newspapers and other available materials, you'll be constructing the story, rather than simply reporting it. The course will move you through each stage of the process, with the end product intended (if possible) to be a public, online document others can learn from.
1088 HIST-300-90 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Elukin, Jonathan TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
1105 HIST-301-90 Biography as History 1.00 SEM Euraque, Dario TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This seminar deals with the theory, methodology and historiography of  historical biography. We begin with varied readings on the theory, method and historiography of biography, and then  transition to deep, critical analysis of substantial classic and contemporary biographies about personae who lived and died in different parts of the world. Students read biographies of political greats, revolutionaries, mystics, artists, poets, musicians and more. No expertise in historical analysis required, or any perquisite history courses. Students enrolled must love to read substantial books, and analyze them.
1126 HRST-125-90 Introduction to Human Rights 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  CD:Not open to Seniors
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students
  This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world.
1146 INTS-243-90 Global African Diasporas 1.00 LEC Gomes, Daniela TWRF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  This course attempts to guide students to think about how the existence of people of African descent is determined by the particularities involved in the process of enslavement, immigration, and in the construction of racial thought globally, which directly affects the formation of black identity and the black population’s tools of resistance. It additionally promotes a series of debates that will approach themes such as the participation of people of African descent in the construction of societies, demythologizing racist theories, and understanding aspects of these dynamics that make contemporary discussions around race peculiar. Also, the course intends to prepare students to denude the concepts they have about the diasporic process in the United States and understand processes that differ from it in several ways.
1021 INTS-308-90 Urban Swahili Coast 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-807-90, URST-307-90
  This course uses the city and polity of Zanzibar as a model and laboratory for understanding the architectural history, geography and planning of Swahili Coast urbanism in East Africa. For more than a thousand years, cities along the East African coastal strip have been major entrepôts linking the African interior with trade networks across the Indian Ocean and beyond. Zanzibar was at the center of this urban region economically and politically especially in the 18thand 19th centuries. After gaining independence in 1963, Zanzibar experienced a socialist revolution and union with Tanganyika during a brief stretch in early 1964, after which it became a partner state in the United Republic of Tanzania. After a period of stasis and even decline, the city's population exploded after 1964. From a town of less than 50,000 people, it has grown to a metropolitan area of more than a half million in just over 55 years. Zanzibar's society and culture are heavily cosmopolitan. Over 90% of the population is Muslim and African-Swahili in ethnic terms, yet the influences (and minority cultures) of Christians, Hindus, Arabs, South Asians, and others abound. This is especially the case in the city's architecture and built environment. All of this makes Zanzibar a spectacular context in which to explore the challenges of balancing historic preservation and urban development in architecture and urban planning. This online course will enable students to investigate Zanzibar's historic importance, architectural significance, and contemporary urban planning and urban environmental challenges. Students will have readings, lectures and virtual visits and case analyses to/for specific important sites and urban planning projects.
1154 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1138 MATH-107-90 Elements of Statistics 1.00 LEC Schuerger, Houston TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  A course designed primarily for students in the social and natural sciences. Topics include graphical methods, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course is not open to students with credit for Mathematics 131 or above, or who have placed into Mathematics 207 on the Mathematic Placement Examination
1124 MATH-121-90 Mathematics of Money 1.00 LEC Wyshinski, Nancy TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Exam and completion of QLIT101 with a grade of C- or better.
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for first-year students
  An introduction to concepts related to financial mathematics. Topics will include simple interest, compound interest, annuities, investments, retirement plans, credit cards, and mortgages. A strong background in algebra is required. Not open to students who have received credit for Math 131 or higher.
1137 MATH-127-90 Functions, Graphs and Modeling 1.00 LEC Gingras, Kaitlyn TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course will focus on the study of functions and graphs and their uses in modeling and applications. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the properties of linear, polynomial, rational piecewise, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Students will learn to work with these functions in symbolic, graphical, numerical and verbal form.
1036 MATH-131-90 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Russo, Paula TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1151 MATH-131-91 Calculus I 1.25 LEC McCurdy, Matthew TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1037 MATH-205-90 Abstraction and Argument 1.00 LEC Russo, Paula TWRF: 8:00AM-9:40AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course deals with methods of proof and the nature of mathematical argument and abstraction. With a variety of results from modern and classical mathematics as a backdrop, we will study the roles of definition, example, and counterexample, as well as mathematical argument by induction, deduction, construction, and contradiction. This course is recommended for distribution credit only for non-majors with a strong mathematical background.
1038 MATH-207-90 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Evans, Kyle TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1135 MATH-207-91 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Skardal, Per Sebastian TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1039 MATH-210-90 Scientific Computing in Matlab 0.50 SEM Pellico, Ryan TR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Math 132 or equivalent and C- or better or concurrent registration in a 200-level math course.
  This course is a computational workshop designed to introduce the student to Matlab, a powerful scientific computing software package. The workshop will focus on visual learning based on graphical displays of scientific data and simulation results from a variety of mathematical subject areas, such as calculus, differential equations, statistics, linear algebra, and numerical analysis. No prior computer language skills are required as basic programming tools such as loops, conditional operators, and debugging techniques will be developed as needed. The workshop will prepare the student for future courses in applied mathematics as well as courses in other disciplines where scientific computing is essential.
1149 MATH-299-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1040 MATH-318-90 Topics in Geometry 1.00 LEC Sandoval, Mary TWRF: 8:00AM-9:40AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 228 or C- or better in each of Mathematics 229 and either Math 205/241 or permission of instructor.
  Differential geometry, projective geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, combinatorial topology, or such topics as the department may specify. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
1057 MUSC-101-70 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LEC Price, Aaron TWRF: 10:00AM-11:30AM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: Music 101 students must register for one of the practicum sessions listed below.
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1058 MUSC-101-80 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine TBA N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1061 MUSC-101-81 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine TBA N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1062 MUSC-101-82 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine TBA N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1063 MUSC-101-83 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine TBA N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1131 NESC-205-90 Neurons, Learning and Memory 1.00 SEM Berger-Sweeney, Joanne WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PSYC-205-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101. or Biology 181, 182 or 183
  NOTE: 16 seats reserved for sophomores.
  NOTE: For permission to enroll, please contact Professor Susan Masino.
  For centuries, scientists have explored how we learn, memorize, and forget items and for the last several decades have tried to determine where in the brain memories are encoded and stored. Recent developments in neuroscience are helping us understand how we learn, remember, forget, and relearn, including the structures, chemicals, and networks in the brain that are involved in these processes. Through enjoyable readings, discussions, guest lectures, films, and demonstrations, we will explore the foundations of this field, as well as recent discoveries and common misconceptions about it. The overall objective of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the neuroscience of learning and memory, enabling them to separate scientific fact from fiction in popular media and beyond.
1055 NESC-305-90 Neurolaw 1.00 SEM Seraphin, Sally TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  All seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  Neurolaw is an emerging field that investigates the application of neuroscience principles and technologies to the legal context. Relying on an evolutionary framework for understanding functional neuroanatomy, this course begins with a detailed overview of how the brain works. It then explores basic scientific findings in affective and cognitive neuroscience and their relevance for substantive laws and procedural rules. In the process, students will learn about the structure of the American legal system and growing opportunities therein for the integration of neuroscientific evidence. Special attention will be paid to the role of structural inequalities and early adverse experiences on brain development, and the use of neuroscience in juvenile justice and in death penalty litigation.
1056 NESC-432-90 Nutrition and Brain Health 1.00 SEM Guardiola-Diaz, Hebe TWRF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: BIOL-432-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L or Biology 183L, and C- or better in Biology 227L or BIOL 317L, or Neuroscience 201, or permission of instructor
  An exploration of the critical role of the brain in the regulation of food intake and of the effect of dietary nutrients in brain function. This seminar will highlight metabolic requirements for optimal brain health and will critique nutritional approaches to manage neurological disorders. Students will analyze, discuss and present relevant literature in physiology, cellular and molecular biology, and neuroscience. This seminar meets the Writing Emphasis 2 requirements in the biology and neuroscience major.
1114 PBPL-304-90 Capital Punishment in America 1.00 SEM Falk, Glenn TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 123, 201, 202 or permission of instructor.
  The course will examine the legal and moral controversies surrounding the application of capital punishment (i.e., the death penalty) as a punishment for homicide. We will consider whether capital punishment is state sanctioned homicide or good public policy. Topics include: capital punishment through history, U.S. Supreme Court decisions and contemporary problems with the application of the death penalty. We will analyze the nature, extent, and distribution of criminal homicide and critically review current innocence project work.
1033 PBPL-398-90 Public Policy Law Intern & Sem 1.00 SEM Moskowitz, Rachel TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.
1013 PBPL-807-90 Urban Swahili Coast 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: INTS-308-90, URST-307-90
  This course uses the city and polity of Zanzibar as a model and laboratory for understanding the architectural history, geography and planning of Swahili Coast urbanism in East Africa. For more than a thousand years, cities along the East African coastal strip have been major entrepôts linking the African interior with trade networks across the Indian Ocean and beyond. Zanzibar was at the center of this urban region economically and politically especially in the 18thand 19th centuries. After gaining independence in 1963, Zanzibar experienced a socialist revolution and union with Tanganyika during a brief stretch in early 1964, after which it became a partner state in the United Republic of Tanzania. After a period of stasis and even decline, the city's population exploded after 1964. From a town of less than 50,000 people, it has grown to a metropolitan area of more than a half million in just over 55 years. Zanzibar's society and culture are heavily cosmopolitan. Over 90% of the population is Muslim and African-Swahili in ethnic terms, yet the influences (and minority cultures) of Christians, Hindus, Arabs, South Asians, and others abound. This is especially the case in the city's architecture and built environment. All of this makes Zanzibar a spectacular context in which to explore the challenges of balancing historic preservation and urban development in architecture and urban planning. This online course will enable students to investigate Zanzibar's historic importance, architectural significance, and contemporary urban planning and urban environmental challenges. Students will have readings, lectures and virtual visits and case analyses to/for specific important sites and urban planning projects.
1111 PBPL-859-90 Economics of Public Policy 1.00 SEM Helming, Troy MW: 6:30PM-9:30PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course utilizes economic reasoning to examine both the proper scope of public policy and the impact of policy decisions. Through economic analysis we will explore how market systems can be used to achieve policy goals and determine most effective government interventions when market failures occur. We examine the effects of policy alternatives including equity, efficiency, and effectiveness on a variety of policy areas such as taxation, education, social insurance, government debt, and healthcare.
1041 POLS-102-90 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats for sophomores, and 2 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1136 POLS-102-91 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Manento, Cory WF: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 19 seats reserved for first year students
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1042 POLS-217-90 Internat'l Relations on Film 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: 9 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats for sophomores, and 2 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers a thematic introduction to international relations by way of a series of feature films. We combine a definitional study of concepts like anarchy, state power, norms, and institutions with a broader analysis of core issues in international politics, including the problems of war and peace, crisis decision-making, revolution, nationalist conflict, sectarianism, human rights, and globalization. To bring these concepts and issues to life and provide empirical focus, we discuss their treatment in classic and contemporary international films by Lean, Kubrick, Pontecorvo, Tamahori, Caro, Kassovitz, Weir, Villeneuve, Spielberg, Greengrass, Meirelles, and Iñárritu.
1045 POLS-301-90 Amer Political Parties & Elec 1.00 LEC Manento, Cory TWRF: 6:00PM-7:40PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
1046 POLS-316-90 Civil Liberties 1.00 SEM McMahon, Kevin TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  An analysis and evaluation of US Supreme Court decisions (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression; the right to privacy; freedom of religion; and, liberty and security.
1043 POLS-317-90 Amer Political Thought 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
1044 POLS-322-90 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Funk, Kevin WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, INTS
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
1123 POLS-326-90 Gender, Politics, and Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie WF: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, WMGS
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused and a sophomore/junior seminar.
  This course explores the role of gender in American politics. We will begin with an examination of the role of women and men in fighting for and against women's suffrage and the subsequent movement to achieve gender equality. We will consider the many ways men's inclusion and women's exclusion from our political system continues to shape contemporary politics and the distribution of power in American society. We will then examine a series of important questions such as: Why are women less likely than men to run for political office? Is America ready for a woman president? Once in office, do male and female politicians govern differently? The last third of the course examines a series of policy areas with respect to gender.
1113 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1029 PSYC-101-90 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Holland, Alisha TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first years
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1132 PSYC-205-90 Neurons, Learning and Memory 1.00 SEM Berger-Sweeney, Joanne WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: NESC-205-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101. or Biology 181, 182 or 183
  NOTE: 16 seats reserved for sophomores.
  NOTE: For permission to enroll, please contact Professor Susan Masino.
  For centuries, scientists have explored how we learn, memorize, and forget items and for the last several decades have tried to determine where in the brain memories are encoded and stored. Recent developments in neuroscience are helping us understand how we learn, remember, forget, and relearn, including the structures, chemicals, and networks in the brain that are involved in these processes. Through enjoyable readings, discussions, guest lectures, films, and demonstrations, we will explore the foundations of this field, as well as recent discoveries and common misconceptions about it. The overall objective of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the neuroscience of learning and memory, enabling them to separate scientific fact from fiction in popular media and beyond.
1027 PSYC-255-80 Cognitive Psychology Lab 0.25 LAB Casserly, Elizabeth TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 255, or concurrent enrollment.
  A hands-on introduction to the methods used in behavioral cognitive science research. We will briefly explore a survey of methods and the process used to create a "program of research" rather than isolated experiments. Students will then develop a big-picture question and research program of their own, designing, executing, and analyzing two experiments with related motivations and methods. The relationship between experimental design and the research report paper will also be emphasized. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 255
1134 PSYC-255-90 Cognitive Psychology 1.00 LEC Anderson, Beth TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  The study of knowledge and how people use it, for example, in recall and recognition, controlling attention and dealing with distractions, solving real-world problems, and spoken or written communication. We will emphasize how each piece of our mental abilities fits together with other skills such as perception and language, along with the ways in which our minds and thoughts can diverge from what we subjectively experience of them.
1026 PSYC-261-90 Brain and Behavior 1.00 LEC Masino, Susan TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101 or Biology 140 or Biology 181 or Biology 182 or Biology 183.
  A basic study of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system with a comprehensive analysis of the biological bases of major classes of behavior. Specific topics include: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, sex, and language. Enrollment in laboratory limited. (1.25 course credits with optional laboratory) The course is designed for declared or intended psychology and neuroscience majors.
1030 PSYC-350-90 Executive Functioning 1.00 SEM Ferreira, Kelly TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A Y WEA2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 255
  This course will examine the cognitive processes that make up executive functioning, which enables us to plan, focus, remember, and multi-task. We will discuss the physiology and brain functioning that is required in the use of these skills, as well as the development of these skills throughout childhood and adolescence. There are three specific processes that make up executive functioning, which include working memory, mental/cognitive flexibility, and self-regulation/inhibitory control, that will be examined throughout the course in depth. We will examine specific tasks used to measure each of these processes and discuss the relationships between these cognitive skills to other areas, such as learning, achievement, substance use, and clinical diagnoses.
1143 PSYC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  A faculty member will supervise a student’s independent examination of topics that fall under the following rubrics: cognitive, social, and gender development (Anselmi); psychopathology, clinical, or counseling psychology (Holt, Lee); neuropsychology (Masino, Raskin); cultural psychology (Chang); social psychology (Chang, Reuman); personality and assessment (Reuman); perception (Mace); psychology of art (Mace); history of psychology (Mace); and language (Anselmi, Mace). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1028 PSYC-402-90 Sr Sem: Psychedelic Drugs 1.00 SEM Grubb, Michael TWRF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is open only to senior Psychology majors.
  Psychoactive substances like LSD, mescaline, and psilocybin exert strong effects on the central nervous system, inducing altered states of conscious experience. In this seminar, we will explore psychedelics from a number of different psychological perspectives. We will examine their mechanisms of action in the brain, probe the resultant impact on perception and cognition, assess the social impact of psychedelics, and discuss their use at different developmental stages of the human lifespan. We will also pay particular attention to a renewed clinical interest in using psychedelics to treat psychological disorders. In addition to writings, podcasts, and multimedia created for a general audience, course content will be heavily drawn from the relevant neuroscience and psychological literatures.
1031 PSYC-402-91 Sr Sem: The Social Self 1.00 SEM Helt, Molly TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is open only to senior Psychology majors.
  This course will examine how we construct a sense of self as a social being. We will integrate research from various areas of psychology to address the following questions (among others): How did you, as a baby, learn that you were separate from your mother? Who is in charge of your actions and how do we figure that out? To what extent are you shaped by your circumstances and the way others view you? What happens when there is a breakdown of boundaries between the self and others, and what does this tell us about conditions such as autism and psychopathy?
1018 RELG-222-90 Voodoo, Zombies, Conjured Dead 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ANTH-222-90
  This course focuses on those religious traditions known collectively as “Voodoo.” By examining powerful displays of spirit possession, rituals in which the ancestors raise from their graves to dance, and secretive ceremonies from which social criminals become walking zombies, students will explore the lived experiences of Voodoo practitioners from around the world. We will juxtapose Western imaginations and fantasies of Voodoo to the real-lived experiences of practitioners. In so doing, students will learn how, despite racial stereotyping and anti-Africa sentiments around the globe, Voodoo has become one of the world’s fastest growing global religions. Along with rich ethnographic texts, throughout the course students will engage with critical-race theory, theories of globalization, transnationalism, diaspora, and urban religious expansion.
1090 RELG-236-90 Religion and Race 1.00 SEM Koertner, Mareike TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with HRST
  Race and religion shape the identity of the individual and its surrounding society. But how do they do that? How do race and religion intersect? What role have they played in shaping our politics, cultures, and values? Do race and religion still matter today? This course looks at the ways race and religion have impacted the U.S. Among the many topics we will cover are the founding fathers' understanding of religious freedom and its race-related limits; the role religion played in justifying and objecting to slavery; the emergence of black religious movements; the Civil Rights Movement; and liberation theologies. Students who have taken FYSM 187 may not receive credit for this course.
1020 RELG-241-90 Bible in Literature and Film 1.00 LEC Hornung, Gabriel TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with JWST
  An examination of both biblical texts and recent novels and films, this course will explore how modern culture interacts with its classical sources. From James Baldwin to the Exodus and the Coen brothers to Job, students will begin by surveying the historical contexts of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, and then study how later traditions have aligned and disagreed with their scriptures. Since the course will focus on the ancient and modern works equally, no prerequisites nor prior knowledge of the subject matter is necessary.
1015 RHET-125-90 Writing for a Digital World 1.00 SEM Cassorla, Leah WF: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A WEA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: 2 seniors 3 juniors 5 sophomores 5 freshman
  As reading and writing shift from pages to screens, images and other visual elements are becoming increasingly important to successful writing. This course is designed to help students think critically about the role of the visual in written communication today. Using digital design tools in combination with academic writing skills such as research and drafting, students will develop strategies and skills for blending images and words effectively in a range of genres and contexts - both digital and printed, academic and professional.
1139 RHET-125-91 Writing for a Digital World 1.00 SEM Marino, Nicholas TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A WEA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  As reading and writing shift from pages to screens, images and other visual elements are becoming increasingly important to successful writing. This course is designed to help students think critically about the role of the visual in written communication today. Using digital design tools in combination with academic writing skills such as research and drafting, students will develop strategies and skills for blending images and words effectively in a range of genres and contexts - both digital and printed, academic and professional.
1014 RHET-202-90 Writing in the Disciplines 1.00 LEC Frymire, Erin TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A WEA2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: 2 seniors 3 juniors 5 sophomores 5 freshman
  Students in this course will explore a variety of genres in scholarly, professional, and public writing. Students will learn to identify and use the conventions of these genres and to make effective rhetorical choices in their writing. Students will engage in writing frequently and intensively to improve overall learning in their discipline. The course will facilitate student involvement with particular bodies of knowledge, their methods of scholarship, and modes of communication.
1118 RHET-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1129 SOCL-246-90 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta TWRF: 6:00PM-7:40PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
1005 SOCL-316-90 Global Gender Inequalities 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta TWRF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course broadly addresses women’s low status and power worldwide. Topics include issues such as son preference, gendered violence, maternal health and reproductive rights, sexual rights, work and household labor, globalization, politics, human rights, and women’s global activism. Utilizing a transnational sociological feminist perspective, students learn how gender inequality intersects with not only culture but also nationalism, racism, and economic injustice in various countries and regions of the world (Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and South America). At several key points, students engage in critical comparison between examples of gender oppression and exploitation observed in both the United States and other societies (i.e., gendered violence), which reveal a false binary in the discourse of progress often drawn between “us” and “them.”
1094 THDN-234-90 An Actor Repairs 1.00 STU Hendrick, Michelle TWRF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor.
  Themes of this class might be: -Paralleling the actor's emotional work with the visual artist's understanding of color theory. -Creating comfort in rehearsal and class so that the actor can learn to be uncomfortable. -Application of intimacy coaching guidelines to help this (such as the importance of "de-roling"). -Boundaries and vulnerability, how to strengthen emotional muscles for use in character development. -What makes for a good monologue or scene? What is a good fit for you? What are your strengths? We will begin to create a "capsule wardrobe" of monologues. -We will use mindfulness practices and prepare our instruments for risk, imagination, clear movement and strong voice. And we will have fun!
1016 THDN-260-90 Framing Motion: Wunderkammer 1.00 STU Kyle, Peter TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: 2 spaces reserved for seniors, 2 for juniors, 2 for sophomores.
  This online course offers a hands-on investigation of creative filmmaking in the spaces we inhabit. Taking the Wunderkammer, or cabinet of curiosities, as a point of departure and embracing a relatively low-tech approach to examining compositional tools and strategies, each student will conceive and develop a series of personalized short videos focusing on playful and dynamic involvement of the body, objects, setting, and the eye of the camera. Physical explorations, readings, video viewings, online discussion forums, and other assignments augment how we interrogate the nature of interaction and creative process toward reimagining the ways we frame motion. The course culminates in a mini online festival showcasing student work. No prerequisite and open to all, regardless of experience.
1122 URST-208-90 Digital Urban Investigation 1.00 SEM Lukens, David TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Urban Studies 101 or CTYP 101 or permission of instructor.
  This course teaches students basic data collection techniques, emphasizes good research practices, and develops students abilities to apply appropriate methods of data collection and analysis to research questions while focusing solely on digital research methods. Students will learn to use social explorer and other census-based data sources, how to analyze social media and link it to spatial data, explore cities and analyze neighborhood change through google street view's time machine function, participatory mapping, and other online sources. These methods will be used to complete interactive assignments testing major paradigms in urban studies and build familiarity with data sources and research skills.
1100 URST-259-90 Latinx Urban Activism 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: HIST-259-90
  NOTE: Seats reserved: 8 First-Year Students, 7 Sophomores, and 6 Juniors.
  We will examine the emergence and evolution of urban political activism by Latinas and Latinos in the United States from the early 1900s to the present. We will begin with the impact of U.S. imperial expansion and colonialism (1848-present), and then track the emergence of Pan-Latinx identities and political coalitions between Latinx, African Americans, and other ethnic groups. Topics include urban political manifestations of the following: civil rights movements, labor and student movements, struggles for gender and sexual liberation, immigration policies, citizenship, voting rights, electoral representation, cultural citizenship, urban renewal, gentrification, and "the right to the city."
1012 URST-307-90 Urban Swahili Coast 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: INTS-308-90, PBPL-807-90
  This course uses the city and polity of Zanzibar as a model and laboratory for understanding the architectural history, geography and planning of Swahili Coast urbanism in East Africa. For more than a thousand years, cities along the East African coastal strip have been major entrepôts linking the African interior with trade networks across the Indian Ocean and beyond. Zanzibar was at the center of this urban region economically and politically especially in the 18thand 19th centuries. After gaining independence in 1963, Zanzibar experienced a socialist revolution and union with Tanganyika during a brief stretch in early 1964, after which it became a partner state in the United Republic of Tanzania. After a period of stasis and even decline, the city's population exploded after 1964. From a town of less than 50,000 people, it has grown to a metropolitan area of more than a half million in just over 55 years. Zanzibar's society and culture are heavily cosmopolitan. Over 90% of the population is Muslim and African-Swahili in ethnic terms, yet the influences (and minority cultures) of Christians, Hindus, Arabs, South Asians, and others abound. This is especially the case in the city's architecture and built environment. All of this makes Zanzibar a spectacular context in which to explore the challenges of balancing historic preservation and urban development in architecture and urban planning. This online course will enable students to investigate Zanzibar's historic importance, architectural significance, and contemporary urban planning and urban environmental challenges. Students will have readings, lectures and virtual visits and case analyses to/for specific important sites and urban planning projects.
1117 AHIS-236-91 High Renaissan Art Italy 1.00 LEC Cadogan, Jean TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Italian painting, sculpture, and architecture from the end of the 15th century through the 16th century. Examines the work of the creators of the High Renaissance style, including Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. The emergence of mannerism in central Italy and its influences on North Italian and Venetian painters will also be explored.
1115 AHIS-241-90 Classical Ideals 1.00 LEC Risser, Martha TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: CLCV-241-90
  Examine the roots of modern beauty standards by digging into the history of the “classical ideal”, down to its origins in Greek and Roman representations of the human body. Social status and beauty seem always to have been correlated; how are nudity and clothing, the athletic ideal, gender and sexuality, and racialized ideals of beauty implicated in portrayals of the bodies of social actors and symbolic bodies? Even character and emotion were portrayed as physically embodied. We’ll analyze classical sculpture, painting, and other arts, supported by readings from studies in the history of art, critical approaches to conceptions of the human form, ancient medical texts, and Greek and Roman poetry.
1092 AHIS-264-90 19C Art: Revolution & War 1.00 LEC Gordon, Alden TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The human experience in the period from 1789-1871 closely parallels modern times. We will explore how the issues in nineteenth-century painting anticipate our concerns today.
1091 AHIS-366-90 Architectural Design Studio 0.50 STU Duncan, David W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ENGR-366-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Art History 364.
  This course is ideal for students interested in an architectural design/portfolio development studio format and is a continuation of AHIS 365. Students will complete an architectural design project of their choice with weekly online meetings and studio critiques with the instructor. These Zoom meetings will include the entire class, allowing students the benefit of seeing and participating in what others are working on.
1010 CLCV-241-90 Classical Ideals 1.00 LEC Risser, Martha TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AHIS-241-90
  Examine the roots of modern beauty standards by digging into the history of the “classical ideal”, down to its origins in Greek and Roman representations of the human body. Social status and beauty seem always to have been correlated; how are nudity and clothing, the athletic ideal, gender and sexuality, and racialized ideals of beauty implicated in portrayals of the bodies of social actors and symbolic bodies? Even character and emotion were portrayed as physically embodied. We’ll analyze classical sculpture, painting, and other arts, supported by readings from studies in the history of art, critical approaches to conceptions of the human form, ancient medical texts, and Greek and Roman poetry.
1128 FREN-102-90 French II 1.00 LEC Evelein, Isabel TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students. 5 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1047 FREN-320-90 French Cinema 1.00 LEC Humphreys, Karen TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: LACS-320-90
  This course is designed to familiarize students with the development and art of the French cinema as seen through its important phases and movements, and in its relationship to modern France. Relevant literary and critical texts will accompany each film. Lectures and coursework will be in English. (Listed as both LACS 320-01 and FREN 320-01.)
1007 HEBR-102-90 Elem Modern Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Katz, Adi TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with JWST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 101 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 101 with emphasis on increasing vocabulary, understanding, writing and speaking skills with widening exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
1069 HISP-101-90 Elementary Spanish I 1.00 LEC Flores, Laura TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. Students with 3 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1070 HISP-102-90 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1071 HISP-201-90 Intermediate Spanish I 1.00 LEC Aldrete, Diana TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1072 HISP-221-90 Advanced Grammar & Composition 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MW: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  Emphasis on composition work in conjunction with a review of grammar, especially of the more difficult and subtle aspects, together with a consideration of stylistics. The writings of selected modern Hispanic authors will serve as models. Generally for students with 5+ years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1109 HISP-251-90 Spain & the Art of the Journey 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: LACS-251-90
  NOTE: Highly recommended for those planning to enroll in Trinity’s Summer 2021 course in Spain as well as those planning to study in that country or other countries during the 2021-22 academic year.
  Is there a difference between a tour and a journey? Or between a hike and a pilgrimage? Many people believe so, and that the difference lies in the traveler’s openness to internal transformations. Spain has long been a land of travelers that, in more recent times, has also become a magnet for visitors from around world. Why has it inspired so many people go “on the move”? In this class, we will explore this rich history of comings and goings, and the ways filmmakers and writers have portrayed the mysteries of travel over time, with an eye toward helping our internal sojourner challenge the often facile “truths” of its neighbor the tourist. Taught in English (HISP credit available if written work done in Spanish).
1060 ITAL-101-90 Elementary Italian I 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take 101 and 102 in sequence. Other than beginning students must have permission of instructor to enroll.
1059 ITAL-102-90 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC King, Joshua TWRF: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1127 ITAL-102-91 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC King, Joshua TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students. 5 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1064 ITAL-228-90 Ital Language & Society 1.00 LEC Palma, Giuliana TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 202 or equivalent.
  This course will examine the relationship between language and society in contemporary Italy and in countries with high levels of Italian migration, while also developing students’ linguistic skills. Topics include: geographical, class, and generational differences in language, the effects of mass media on language, and the Italian of immigrants to the United States. As part of their coursework, students will conduct interviews with Italian Americans in the Hartford area.
1024 JAPN-238-90 Japanese Culture 1.00 LEC Izumi, Katsuya TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: LACS-238-90
  In this course, students will engage critically with the Japanese culture. Through animation films directed by Miyazaki Hayao, Kon Satoshi, and others, and modern Japanese short stories, we will examine the ideas of "basic" and perhaps "typical" Japanese cultural aspects and elements, as defined in Roger J. Davies and Osamu Ikeno's The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture. Students are expected to think about these aspects and elements, watching animation films and reading short stories. Most importantly, however, students are required to analyze the Japanese works from a critical perspective and to write "argumentative essays" on them. By close-reading the texts (both films and literary works), students will develop sensitivities toward what flows underneath cultural representations The coursework includes multiple drafts of term papers.
1022 LACS-212-90 Border Lives 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  We live in a bordered world. While some national borders may seem invisible, allowing for easy crossing, others are heavily guarded-stern markers of state sovereignty and protectionism. In this course we will examine the broad political and cultural implications of borders, from the 20th century into the present. Our main focus will be on the lived experience of-and on-the border, with special attention given to transnational travel, migration (increasingly climate related), exile, and the unique cultures that emerge in borderlands. Aside from reading essential texts within the field of Border Studies, we will explore several novels, short stories and films from different parts of the world-from the Berlin Wall to the US-Mexico Border
1023 LACS-233-90 Godfather: Art of Hard Choices 0.50 LEC Alcorn, John TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The Godfather and The Godfather Part II films are narrative masterpieces that provide many insights into the interplay of character and culture in decision-making in high-stakes situations outside the law. We will interpret the films as illustrations of strategic interaction in stylized mafia settings. We will focus on the psychology of motivations: rationality, interest, emotion, justice, and the mafia’s code of honor (vendetta, omertà, and gender norms). And we will discuss narrative techniques and the relationship between art and life (fiction and reality).
1025 LACS-238-90 Japanese Culture 1.00 LEC Izumi, Katsuya TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: JAPN-238-90
  In this course, students will engage critically with the Japanese culture. Through animation films directed by Miyazaki Hayao, Kon Satoshi, and others, and modern Japanese short stories, we will examine the ideas of "basic" and perhaps "typical" Japanese cultural aspects and elements, as defined in Roger J. Davies and Osamu Ikeno's The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture. Students are expected to think about these aspects and elements, watching animation films and reading short stories. Most importantly, however, students are required to analyze the Japanese works from a critical perspective and to write "argumentative essays" on them. By close-reading the texts (both films and literary works), students will develop sensitivities toward what flows underneath cultural representations The coursework includes multiple drafts of term papers.
1108 LACS-251-90 Spain & the Art of the Journey 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: HISP-251-90
  NOTE: Highly recommended for those planning to enroll in Trinity’s Summer 2021 course in Spain as well as those planning to study in that country or other countries during the 2021-22 academic year.
  Is there a difference between a tour and a journey? Or between a hike and a pilgrimage? Many people believe so, and that the difference lies in the traveler’s openness to internal transformations. Spain has long been a land of travelers that, in more recent times, has also become a magnet for visitors from around world. Why has it inspired so many people go “on the move”? In this class, we will explore this rich history of comings and goings, and the ways filmmakers and writers have portrayed the mysteries of travel over time, with an eye toward helping our internal sojourner challenge the often facile “truths” of its neighbor the tourist. Taught in English (HISP credit available if written work done in Spanish).
1145 LACS-288-90 Who Am I & Where Am I Going 1.00 LEC Any, Carol TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: RUSS-288-90
  How many personal identities do you have? Lover, friend, brother or sister, gambler, worshipper, skeptic, liar, outsider, psychotic-we may play all of these parts simultaneously or at different times in our lives. Through discussion of literary texts, with some forays into religion and psychology, we will consider the ways in which our multiple identities shape our self-image as well as how others see us. Readings will include fiction from Dostoevsky to Alice Walker, as well as the existential philosophy of Victor Frankl, the psychological theories of Freud, and selections from the Bible.
1048 LACS-320-90 French Cinema 1.00 LEC Humphreys, Karen TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: FREN-320-90
  This course is designed to familiarize students with the development and art of the French cinema as seen through its important phases and movements, and in its relationship to modern France. Relevant literary and critical texts will accompany each film. Lectures and coursework will be in English. (Listed as both LACS 320-01 and FREN 320-01.)
1011 LATN-101-90 Fundamentals for Reading Latin 1.50 LEC Dugan, Kelly WF: 2:00PM-3:40PM
TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM
N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: Intensive section for students who have previously taken Latin
  This course focuses on the fundamental knowledge required to read and write in Latin. In addition to acquiring core vocabulary for reading major Latin authors, students learn the forms of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs, with a special emphasis on the flexibility of noun cases, and basic subordinate clauses. This course is suitable for students who are embarking on the study of Latin, and an excellent review for students who have studied Latin previously.
1008 RUSS-101-90 Elementary Russian I 1.00 LEC Lahti, Katherine TWRF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, RUSSSTUD
  This course for beginners emphasizes active command of Russian through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. A web component enhances knowledge of the living language and illustrates cultural differences. This class meets three hours a week and carries one credit.
1144 RUSS-288-90 Who Am I & Where Am I Going 1.00 LEC Any, Carol TWRF: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: LACS-288-90
  How many personal identities do you have? Lover, friend, brother or sister, gambler, worshipper, skeptic, liar, outsider, psychotic-we may play all of these parts simultaneously or at different times in our lives. Through discussion of literary texts, with some forays into religion and psychology, we will consider the ways in which our multiple identities shape our self-image as well as how others see us. Readings will include fiction from Dostoevsky to Alice Walker, as well as the existential philosophy of Victor Frankl, the psychological theories of Freud, and selections from the Bible.
1104 STAR-113-90 Visual Thinking: Design 1.00 STU Reeds, Scott WF: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: 4 seats reserved for first year students, 3 seats for sophomores, 3 seats for juniors and 2 seats for seniors.
  This studio design course is an investigation of the fundamentals of visual language, with an introduction into the principles of design, with research into color theory, composition and sequencing, including the development of writing, typography and reproduction, communication and data visualization. The studio course is experiential and process-oriented.