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Course Listing for SOCIOLOGY - Fall 2024 (ALL: 09/03/2024 - 12/18/2024)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1473 SOCL-101-01 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Gabriel, Ricardo TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOIP  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
2405 SOCL-101-02 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOIP  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 reserved for HMTCA students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
3486 SOCL-101-03 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Vickers, Mary Jane MW: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOIP  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 5 reserved for HMTCA students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
2339 SOCL-202-01 Clas & Contemp Theory 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  Critical examination of the major theoretical perspectives current in sociology (structure functionalism, interactionism, conflict theory, exchange theory, and ethnomethodology) and consideration of their implications for core problems: such as social order and social change that concern all sociologists. Also, emphasis upon the methods of theory construction, the relationship between theory and research, and the significance of the classic (e.g., Durkheim’s Suicide) for sociologists now.
1628 SOCL-210-01 Statistics for Social Sciences 1.00 LEC Vickers, Mary Jane MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course is an introduction to statistical methods, their conceptual underpinnings, and their use in analyzing social science data. Topics include basic presentation and graphing of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, the normal distribution, one and two sample t-tests and tests of proportions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, and an introduction to linear regression. The course will emphasize the logic and practice of statistical analysis as it applies to the social sciences. Students will also learn to carry out basic statistical analysis with the aid of computer software. This course is intended for students who want a practical introduction to statistical methods and who plan to major in a social science.
2635 SOCL-241-01 Mass Media & Pop Culture 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA SOIP  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course examines the integral role mass communication has in social and cultural life. Specifically, it explores how we identify and construct our social identity using media images. This is accomplished by focusing on different types of media content and their effect on individuals and culture, as well as by examining audience response to media content. Other topics covered include the social and economic organization of mass media, development of communication technologies, and sexist and racist stereotypes in the media.
2636 SOCL-245-01 Environmental Sociology 1.00 LEC Gabriel, Ricardo T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  Environmental sociology is a growing subfield of sociology which examines the relationship between social systems and ecosystems. It explores the many ways human societies impact the natural world and how the natural world shapes human societies. The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the central debates in environmental sociology and explore current environmental topics from a sociological perspective. At the end of the course, you will be able to describe key theories in environmental sociology and explain how environmental sociologists look at issues like the global climate crisis, the current mass extinction of animal and plant species, the environmental impacts of food production, energy production, ecotourism, and more.
3396 SOCL-253-01 Mental Health Politics 1.00 SEM Andersson, Tanetta TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  Why is our mental health system so fragmented? Are prisons the new carceral asylums? What might a people's psychology look like? Sociologists counter the medical model by examining mental health institutions through structural relations and also understand the concept of mental illness as culture-bound. From state-run asylums, community-based care, and the post-deinstitutionalization era, this course traces shifts in our mental health policies. In particular, this course addresses how power interacts with institutions, mental health policy, the logics of the criminal legal system, and medical debates and expertise which medicalize and control people, especially those marginalized by anti-blackness and ableism.
3292 SOCL-303-01 Sociology of Education 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  PR: EDUC200 or SOCL101
  This course will examine and apply a sociological perspective to education and schooling. It will examine the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that culture and social structures affect educational institutions. It begins by surveying texts which look at education and schooling from different viewpoints within sociological theory (including but not limited to: functionalism, rationalization, conflict theory, cultural studies, feminism, and intersectionality).The course then examines contemporary issues affecting US and international educational systems, considers proposed reforms, and discussed alternatives to schooling. In addition to weekly written assignments, students will complete a secondary data analysis project related to an educational topic of their choice.
3342 SOCL-312-01 Social Class & Mobility 1.00 LEC Couloute, Lucius TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOIP  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course is an introduction to the theory and research on stratification and mobility in modern societies. Every society distributes resources unequally. This distribution affects not only economic outcomes such as wages, profits, and material well being, but also social and political outcomes such as protest, voting behavior, and self-esteem. This course will explore why this occurs, the types of inequalities that exist, and the consequences of inequality for the distribution of power and for democratic processes in American society. Specific topics include class, occupational, race and gender inequalities, and the social, psychological, and cultural consequences of inequality.
2354 SOCL-316-01 Global Gender Inequalities 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta MW: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course broadly addresses women’s low status and power worldwide. Topics include issues such as son preference, gendered violence, maternal health and reproductive rights, sexual rights, work and household labor, globalization, politics, human rights, and women’s global activism. Utilizing a transnational sociological feminist perspective, students learn how gender inequality intersects with not only culture but also nationalism, racism, and economic injustice in various countries and regions of the world (Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and South America). At several key points, students engage in critical comparison between examples of gender oppression and exploitation observed in both the United States and other societies (i.e., gendered violence), which reveal a false binary in the discourse of progress often drawn between “us” and “them.”
3343 SOCL-325-01 Sociology of Law 1.00 LEC Couloute, Lucius TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students.
  NOTE: Please contact Professor Johnny Williams for registration information: Johnny.Williams@trincoll.edu
  This course offers a sociological perspective on the law, as well as the causes and consequences of the legal system. Topics covered include a comparison of scientific and legal modes of inquiry, the uses and importance of social science findings in judicial and policy decision-making, social factors affecting jury selection and jury decisions, racial and class inequalities and the law, law as a form of social control, legal organizations and professions, and law as an instrument of social change.
1456 SOCL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1457 SOCL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Credit does not count toward the major. Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (0.5 - 1 course credit)
1472 SOCL-490-01 Research Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake substantial research work with a faculty member. Students need to complete a special registration form, available online, and have it signed by the supervising instructor.
2892 SOCL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Written report on original research project. Students should consult with the faculty supervisor before registration, i.e., during the previous spring term. Required of all candidates for honors; elective for others. Submission of the special registration form and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits to be completed in two semesters.)