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Course Listing for PHILOSOPHY - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1519 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Wade, Maurice TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 102 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
2574 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 220 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
1520 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MECC - 220 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
2567 PHIL-227-01 Philosophy of Perception 1.00 LEC Antich, Peter MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MC - 303 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  This course will provide an introduction to major questions in the philosophy of perception, such as: What are perceptions? Are perceptions mental representations or do they make us directly aware of the world? What is the difference between perceptions, hallucinations, illusions, and imaginings? Does perception justify beliefs about the world? What kind of properties does perception reveal? Can perception reveal moral qualities? Through study of major historical and contemporary readings, students will be asked begin forming their own answers to these questions. “Philosophy of Perception” will broach issues in a number of areas of Philosophy, including Philosophy of Mind, Epistemology, and Aesthetics, as well as in Psychology and other fields.
2421 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LIB - 181 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, PBPL
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
2535 PHIL-283-01 Early Modern Philosophy 1.00 LEC Antich, Peter MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM MC - 303 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  The history of Western philosophy from approximately 1600 to 1750, with major attention given to Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley and Hume. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
2422 PHIL-306-01 20th C Cont Phil 1.00 SEM Vogt, Erik M: 1:15PM-3:55PM GW - L HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  What are poets for in a destitute time?” asks Heidegger’s favorite poet, Holderlin. We add, “and what are philosophers for?” The tradition of 20th-century continental philosophy has responded, “certainly not just to analyze language!” We shall follow some of the leading figures and themes of this rich tradition from its roots in Nietzsche through the transformations of phenomenology, to existentialism and beyond. Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Derrida will be studied among others.
2083 PHIL-310-01 Question of Justice 1.00 SEM Marcano, Donna-Dale MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM MC - 313 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  This course will be centered on the question: “What is justice?” The majority of the semester will be devoted to a historical survey of the different philosophical conceptions of justice from Plato to 20th-century political theorists like Rawls, Nozick, and Kelsen. In the final weeks of the course, we will turn our attention to the “crime against humanity,” which is arguably the greatest challenge to contemporary formulations of justice. Specifically, we will analyze the morality and political viability of recent truth commissions (like those in South Africa, Chile, Uganda, Haiti, and Argentina) and international criminal tribunals (like those set up by the United Nations for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia). We will also consider the theoretical and practical value of the discourses surrounding “restorative justice” and “transitional justice” over and against more traditional frameworks.
2423 PHIL-320-01 Marx 1.00 LEC Wade, Maurice
Vogt, Erik
M: 6:30PM-9:00PM MC - 307 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  A great deal of philosophical study has been devoted to the views of Karl Marx, yet much disagreement remains concerning what Marx actually thought. This course will examine some contemporary interpretations of Marx’s work against the background of some of his more important writings. Though we cannot realistically hope to arrive at the “correct” interpretation of Marx’s views, we can at least assess the merits of some of the contending accounts.
2536 PHIL-327-01 Embodied Self: Merleau-Ponty 1.00 SEM Antich, Peter W: 6:30PM-9:00PM LIB - 174  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  A close examination of some of the central works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and relevant critical commentary. Though less well-known than his sometimes colleague and friend, J.P. Sartre, Merleau-Ponty has been described by Paul Ricoeur as "the greatest of the French phenomenologists." Although difficult to summarize, his philosophical efforts were aimed primarily at developing a radical re-description of embodied experience (focusing upon studies of perception) while avoiding the tendency of the philosophical tradition to drift between two flawed and equally unsatisfactory alternatives: empiricism and, what he called, intellectualism. His work continues to have relevance for fields as diverse as cognitive science, medical ethics, ecology, sociology, psychology, feminism, and race theory.
2424 PHIL-335-01 Technology & Death: Heidegger 1.00 SEM Ewegen, Shane F: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Martin Heidegger is arguably the most important philosopher of the 20th century. Yet because of the myopia of the Anglo-American philosophic tradition, he has only recently begun to receive the attention he deserves in the English-speaking world. This seminar will make a careful study of Heidegger’s magnum opus, Being and Time. In addition to our reflection on the intrinsic meaning and merit of this book, we shall consider some of its important roots in the tradition and some of the ways in which it prepares the way both for Heidegger’s own radically transformed later thought and for the most recent trends in contemporary continental philosophy.
2425 PHIL-378-01 Philosophy of Mind 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari W: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 133 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  In this course we will investigate classical and contemporary theories of mind, such as dualism, logical behaviorism, materialism, and functionalism. Among the issues we will consider are what is the nature of the mental? Is the mind identical with or distinct from the body? What is the nature of consciousness? Is the mind a genuine cause? What, if anything, do contemporary investigations in cognitive science and artificial intelligence have to teach us about the nature of the mind?
1261 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2842 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.
2295 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with PHIL
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.