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Course Listing for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2023 (ALL: 01/25/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3318 INTS-131-01 Modern Iran 1.00 LEC Bauer, Janet TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TC - 142 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with MIDDLEAST, WMGS
  This course provides an introduction to 20th-century Iranian society, culture, and politics, examining secular and religious debates over gender roles, modernity, Islamism, democracy, and the West.
2988 INTS-207-01 Global South 1.00 LEC Gunasena, Natassja TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 102 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
3328 INTS-207-02 Global South 1.00 LEC Gunasena, Natassja TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LIB - 181 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
2919 INTS-211-01 Global Intimacies 1.00 LEC Zhang, Shunyuan MW: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - S201 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS Cross-listing: WMGS-211-01
  What is globalization? A process of homogenization and Americanization? Where does globalization happen? In the economic realm that we usually associate with the public? In contrast to these conceptualizations, this course explores diverse and contingent processes of globalization in the domestic and private spheres. Specifically, we will look at how global mobilities trouble and complicate intimate relations such as marriage, love, sex, reproduction, family making, and self-identity across culture.
3144 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque, Dario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - T308 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER Cross-listing: HIST-236-01
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is to give students a panoramic view of Latin America and the Caribbean and to introduce them to various issues that are explored more deeply in upper-division courses. We will address questions of demography and geography, basic historical periods and processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender issues, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions' positions within the historical and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies concentration.
3022 INTS-219-01 Islam in Carib & Latin America 1.00 SEM Cancelled GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, LATINAMER
  Islam in the Caribbean and Latin America. This course provides an introduction to studying Islam, Muslim social and political life, gender/minority rights, and diaspora Islam through the lens of Muslim-minority societies in the Caribbean and Latin America, a microcosm of Islam in the world.
3076 INTS-236-01 Japanese Crime Lit & Film 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - T308 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: JAPN-236-01
  This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
2923 INTS-258-01 The Islamic City 1.00 LEC Antrim, Zayde TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 307 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD, MIDDLEAST, URST Cross-listing: AHIS-257-01, HIST-258-01
  This course explores the great variety of cities founded, claimed, and inhabited by Muslims from the beginnings of Islam to the present day. While there is no such thing as a prototypical "Islamic city," this course grapples with questions of change and continuity in the organization of urban life among Muslims globally. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will situate cities in their historical contexts, examine their built environments, and consider the ways in which exchange, mobility, empire, revolution, and globalization have shaped urban space.
3120 INTS-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM McFadden, Keavy TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 311 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: URST-302-01
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
2989 INTS-306-01 War and the Asian Diaspora 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  How has war shaped and reshaped the Asian diasporic experience in the mid to late 20th century? This course examines texts by Sri Lankan, Korean, Vietnamese and other anglophone Asian voices to examine how militarized conflict intersects with gender and sexuality to shape the politics and experiences of Asians in diaspora. We will read novels, poetry, academic articles and essays on the experiences of Asian subjects who have witnessed/survived/ been impacted by war in their homelands in order to understand the systemic and as well as everyday effects of militarization, ethnic violence and imperialism.
3245 INTS-315-01 Urban South Asia 1.00 SEM Goldstein, Shoshana W: 1:30PM-4:10PM SH - T302 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-815-01, URST-815-01
  This seminar introduces students to South Asia and the Indian ocean as vast urbanizing world regions, encompassing more than a third of the global population. Students will study contemporary urban challenges through histories of colonialism and economic expansion. They will learn about important concepts in the development of urban planning as a form of colonial experimentation, and the role of cities such as Kolkata, Mumbai, Delhi, and Lahore in 20th century nation-building. Themes will include how South Asia challenges the conceptual divide between urban and rural, the role of small cities, diaspora labor and capital in shaping urban development beyond the Indian subcontinent, gender, ethnic conflict, and climate change.
2925 INTS-320-01 Global 1001 Nights 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LIB - B02 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD, MIDDLEAST Cross-listing: WMGS-320-01, HIST-320-01
  This seminar explores the history and global dissemination of the fantasy story collection known as the 1001 Nights. The recent success of movie adaptations of Aladdin is just one of the many waves of popularity that these stories have enjoyed over the centuries. We will begin with medieval story-telling and the circulation of the Nights in Arabic. We will then discuss its transformation into an international best-seller in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in the context of British and French colonialism. Finally we will map its more recent reinventions in literature, film, and art across the globe. Key topics will include magic, gender, sexuality, race, empire, and orientalism. Students will undertake a final research project.
3064 INTS-349-01 Global Migration/Refugee Lab 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet F: 3:00PM-4:10PM MC - 205 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, PBPL Cross-listing: HRST-349-01
  Provides an experiential-based introduction to the practical challenges of refugee and immigrant resettlement and integration and to the development of effective policies and implementation strategies to address them. Students will be placed with a community-based organization working with immigrants and refugees 10-12 hours a week and attend (weekly or biweekly) seminar class meetings to integrate their onsite learning experience and responsibilities with discussions of assigned readings and relevant concepts in participatory action research and diaspora studies. Seminar meetings will be organized around enrolled students' existing class schedules.
3154 INTS-379-01 Fem & Queer Theory/Postcol 1.00 SEM Zhang, Shunyuan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - N128 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS Cross-listing: WMGS-379-01
  Feminist and queer theory has influenced contemporary understandings of gender and sexuality globally. This course explores this body of theory specifically in relation to the processes and problematics of colonialism, postcolonialism, nationalism, and transnationalism. Readings will reflect a variety of critical perspectives and consider the intersection of gender and sexuality with race and class.
2332 INTS-385-01 Global Economic Issues 1.00 SEM Jogani, Chitra TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 313 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  The course will discuss the various issues of global importance, such as climate change, poverty, health, the impact of trade, and foreign aid. We will focus on the current scenario, public policies, and the debate surrounding the above issues. The course will also explore the role of market and state and compare different social systems, such as capitalism and socialism. On completion of the course, a student is expected to have an increased understanding of topics that have engaged policymakers from around the world and be equipped to participate in the policy debate
1232 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2928 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Zhang, Shunyuan R: 1:30PM-4:10PM MC - 305 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
1305 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (0.5 - 1 course credit)
1766 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis. This course will be graded as Pass/Fail.
2892 ANTH-205-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 115V - 106 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, INTS Cross-listing: RELG-205-01
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
2905 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain, Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 205 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
3137 CHIN-415-01 Advanced Chinese IV 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - T408 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
  Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
3053 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  This second half of the China survey covers the period between the establishment of the multi-ethnic Qing empire to the present. As we go through the last four hundred years of Chinese history, we will consider several questions: How did the experience of the Qing, the last imperial dynasty, influence the trajectory of modern China? How did China grapple with modernity? Why is modern Chinese history marked with upheaval and revolution? How do the global and the local intertwine in the making of modern China? In the process, we will look at the kinds of historiographical debates that have animated scholarship, primarily in English, about early modern and modern China.
2826 LACS-212-01 Border Lives 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM HL - 121 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  We live in a bordered world. While some national borders may seem invisible, allowing for easy crossing, others are heavily guarded-stern markers of state sovereignty and protectionism. In this course we will examine the broad political and cultural implications of borders, from the 20th century into the present. Our main focus will be on the lived experience of-and on-the border, with special attention given to transnational travel, migration (increasingly climate related), exile, and the unique cultures that emerge in borderlands. Aside from reading essential texts within the field of Border Studies, we will explore several novels, short stories and films from different parts of the world-from the Berlin Wall to the US-Mexico Border
  View syllabus
3110 LACS-218-01 The Task of the Translator 1.00 SEM Kippur, Sara TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL, INTS
  Completion of a 202 language course, or equivalent
  Translation is one of the most critical skills for navigating our globalized world. Whether we are reading news stories from across the globe, watching Netflix shows from other languages and cultures, or studying abroad, we confront situations in which translation matters. In this course, students will develop practical skills in the art of translation, while also studying some of the crucial theories and questions that inform the field of Translation Studies. From infamous translation controversies to contemporary debates around translation and identity, our readings and discussions will analyze the political, ethical, and cultural stakes of translating. Given the practical component of the course, in which students workshop their own translations-in-progress, an intermediate-level knowledge of any language besides English is required (completion of 202 level or equivalent).
3029 PHIL-223-01 African Philosophy 1.00 LEC De Schryver, Carmen TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM MC - 305 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, INTS
  In this course, we explore key meta-philosophical debates in African philosophy. Some of the topics we will explore include: the nature of philosophy; the connection between philosophy and place; the difference between oral and written traditions; the influence of language on the scope of philosophical thought; the relationship between philosophy, myth, and religion; the philosophical aspiration to universality; and the possibility of collective, as opposed to individual, philosophical practice. Our discussion of these questions will take place through a close reading of a range of figures, including Henry Odera Oruka, John Mbiti, Paulin Hountondji, Fabien Eboussi-Boulaga, Ngûgî wa Thiong'o, and Kwasi Wiredu.
2858 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert, Andrew W: 1:30PM-4:10PM AAC - 231 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  NOTE: This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
2891 RELG-205-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 115V - 106 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, INTS Cross-listing: ANTH-205-01
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
2773 WMGS-324-01 Transgender Migrations 1.00 SEM Provitola, Blase T: 1:30PM-4:10PM LIB - 174 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, INTS Cross-listing: LACS-324-01
  This interdisciplinary course explores the concept of migration through narratives of crossing geographical and gender borders. By putting films, memoirs, novels, and graphic novels in conversation with history and sociology, we will consider the ways in which bodies are regulated by political, legal, and economic forces as they come to occupy and invent new spaces for themselves Topics include the metaphor of "border crossing" in narratives of gender transition, interactions between global gender identities and local cultures, neoliberalism and the so-called "migrant crisis," transgender asylum seekers and sexual rights discourse, and representations of sex work.