blank
Select a level:
Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.
blank

Course Listing for HUMAN RIGHTS STUDIES - Spring 2021 (ALL: 02/08/2021 - 05/17/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1402 HRST-373-01 Hum Rts Thru Perfmnc:Incarcrtd 1.00 LEC Lea, Joseph W: 2:00PM-5:15PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: There are 3 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 seats reserved for sophomores, 6 seats reserved for juniors, and 4 seats reserved for seniors.
  In this course we will examine selected human rights issues through a multi-disciplinary approach that includes readings, discussion, journal writing, site visits and art-making. This semester's study will look at life behind the razor wire—what are the human rights issues that emerge in the world of the incarcerated? Included in our investigation will be the question of the death penalty, the notion of rehabilitation vs. punishment, gender-specific issues and the impact of the arts on prisoners and the institution of prison.
1119 HRST-399-01 Human Rights Studies 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1117 HRST-497-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term project.
1118 HRST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2593 ENGL-209-90 Prison Literature 1.00 LEC Fisher, Sheila MW: 11:55AM-1:35PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course examines texts, both fictional and non-fictional, written about and often in prison. While the course covers a variety of genres and historical periods, the common thread linking all the texts is that their authors were or are incarcerated. Through the works of canonical and non-canonical writers such as Thoreau, Wilde, King, Mandela, Davis, Horton, and currently incarcerated women and men, we will explore how the experience of imprisonment influences the individual, and his or her family, community, and society and raises questions about freedom, transgression, and human rights. This course will have a community learning component and will introduce students to some of the writers whose works we will be studying. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2416 INTS-250-01 Global Migration 1.00 LEC Bauer, Janet TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, EDUC, GLBLSTD, HRST, PBPL Cross-listing: INTS-250-90
  This course explores population mobility as an outcome of global processes and investigates its role in reconfiguring personal, cultural, social, political, and economic life. Specifically considers the impact of migration on gender relations and identities, cultural and educational practices, integration policies, individual and group rights and questions of citizenship and governance.
2701 INTS-250-90 Global Migration 1.00 LEC Bauer, Janet TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, EDUC, HRST, PBPL Cross-listing: INTS-250-01
  This course explores population mobility as an outcome of global processes and investigates its role in reconfiguring personal, cultural, social, political, and economic life. Specifically considers the impact of migration on gender relations and identities, cultural and educational practices, integration policies, individual and group rights and questions of citizenship and governance.
2580 INTS-306-90 War and the Asian Diaspora 1.00 SEM Gunasena, Natassja TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, HRST
  How has war shaped and reshaped the Asian diasporic experience in the mid to late 20th century? This course examines texts by Sri Lankan, Korean, Vietnamese and other anglophone Asian voices to examine how militarized conflict intersects with gender and sexuality to shape the politics and experiences of Asians in diaspora. We will read novels, poetry, academic articles and essays on the experiences of Asian subjects who have witnessed/survived/ been impacted by war in their homelands in order to understand the systemic and as well as everyday effects of militarization, ethnic violence and imperialism.
2503 INTS-358-90 Seminar on Malcolm X 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MW: 11:55AM-1:35PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, HRST
  In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will seek to understand the making of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, most popularly known as Malcolm X, one of Black America's most important political leaders of the 20th century. How did Malcolm X define 'world revolution'? To answer this overarching question, we will critically assess autobiographical and biographical texts and academic literature as well as speeches, travel diaries, music, film, and poetry. Our goal is to situate Malcolm X within a Black radical protest tradition by taking into consideration themes and ideas that are pertinent to the study of the worldwide African Diaspora.
1914 LAAL-200-90 Action Research Methods Htfd 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity M: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC, HRST, PBPL, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply by 11/6 online at action-lab.org/apply
  What is the role of academic research in social change? How can students and community groups collaborate effectively to co-create, implement, and use research projects to solve social problems? In this course, students will study the theories and methods of interdisciplinary action research. Emphasizing ethical collaboration, students will learn research design strategies, methods, tools, and research tools in order to work with community partners to solve pressing problems. Students will learn to use a variety of statistical, geographic, and interview data to answer questions, make recommendations, and tell stories about the issues that are most relevant to Hartford.
1915 LAAL-201-01 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity T: 2:00PM-4:40PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-90
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
1916 LAAL-201-02 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity W: 2:00PM-4:40PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-91
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
1917 LAAL-201-03 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity R: 2:00PM-4:40PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-92
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
1918 LAAL-201-04 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity W: 6:15PM-8:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-93
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2770 LAAL-201-90 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-01
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2771 LAAL-201-91 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity W: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-02
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2772 LAAL-201-92 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity R: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-03
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2773 LAAL-201-93 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity W: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-201-04
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2274 LAAL-202-01 Hartford Research Pub Health 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity T: 6:15PM-8:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-202-90
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners, with an emphasis on public health and wellness. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2774 LAAL-202-90 Hartford Research Pub Health 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity T: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, PBPL, URST Cross-listing: LAAL-202-01
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners, with an emphasis on public health and wellness. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2032 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
2358 POLS-397-90 Comparative Policing 1.00 LEC Flom, Hernan TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST
  Policing is the basic function of the modern state. Police are often the primary, if not the sole, state presence in some neighborhoods, yet their legitimacy is frequently disputed because of corruption or human rights abuses. This course will offer a comparative perspective on how policing works (and why it often does not), focusing on cases from developed and developing economies-including the United States. We will discuss what are police main roles and functions, police linkages with politicians, citizens and criminals, and the role of police in the global war on drugs.