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Course Listing for HUMAN RIGHTS STUDIES - Fall 2024 (ALL: 09/03/2024 - 12/18/2024)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1691 HRST-125-01 Introduction to Human Rights 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  CD:Not open to Seniors
  NOTE: Seniors will not be allowed to enroll in this class.
  This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world.
2949 HRST-228-01 Friends and Enemies 0.50 SEM King, Joshua
Terwiel, Anna
TR: 6:30PM-8:00PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: Open only to students in the Trinity Prison Seminar Series/Hartford Correctional Center
  What is friendship? From ancient Greece to the present, this question has been central to our understanding of what it means to be human in a shared world. Is friendship a relationship based on sameness, or can it be based on difference? How does friendship relate to conflict? Is conflict a threat to friendship, turning friends into enemies, or can it also draw us closer? In this class, we will explore these questions by reading and discussing key works of literature and political theory. Assigned readings will include works from a range of writers such as Aristotle, Dante, Carl Schmitt, and Audre Lorde. Students will write regular reading responses and complete a final paper. Open only to students in the Trinity Prison Seminar Series/Hartford Correctional Center
2371 HRST-312-01 Question of Justice & the Arts 1.00 SEM Aldrete, Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  With a study of works from artists and critical readings, this course examines the role of artistic production as a tool to help societies that face extreme conflict and bloodshed in Latin America. How does a society grapple with violence? What does art offer in considering human rights discourse such as a common truth during and after conflict? What is the role of art in the process of "transitional justice?" While this course will pay particular attention to the truth and reconciliation commissions in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Peru, it will also examine other areas of Latin America that have experienced extreme violence, real and symbolic.
1927 HRST-348-01 New Beginnings 1.00 SEM Dworin, Judy
Fisher, Sheila
Matias, Lisa
M: 11:00AM-12:45PM
T: 5:00PM-7:00PM
TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC Cross-listing: THDN-348-01
  NOTE: Please contact Professor Judy Dworin (Judy.Dworin@trincoll.edu or judy@jdpp.org) with any questions regarding this class.
  In this seminar, we will investigate the application of the arts to populations with a focus on, but not limited to, urban youth at risk; those incarcerated; families affected by incarceration; and victims of crime. We will look at the role the arts and restorative justice play in a healing and rehabilitative process with these populations, analyzing the mission, goals, action steps, and results through research and hands-on experience. In conjunction with two Hartford-based nonprofit organizations, students will do a significant fieldwork project, entitled New Beginnings, that will include research, participation, and analysis.
1403 HRST-399-01 Human Rights Studies 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
2657 HRST-409-01 Race, Gender, Global Security 1.00 SEM Heatherton, Christina T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-809-01, AMST-409-01
  Recent events have focused attention on questions of race, gender, social justice, and the militarization of police. This course will consider how notions of race and security that evolved in the late 20th and early 21st century U.S., have shaped political discourse, and how in turn, those ideas have circulated around the world. Through analyses of American Studies texts, documentaries, and popular culture, we will consider both emerging and prevailing definitions of security. By examining case studies in major global cities, including Los Angeles, we will explore how space has been organized around the logics of racialized threats and gendered notions of safety. For a cumulative paper, students will select a global city and offer history, context, and analysis of the production of insecure spaces.
1699 HRST-466-01 Human Rights Teaching Assistnt 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (1.0 course credit)
1605 HRST-490-01 Research Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake substantial research work with a faculty member. Students need to complete a special registration form, available online, and have it signed by the supervising instructor.
2661 HRST-495-01 Senior Research Colloquium 1.00 SEM Carbonetti, Benjamin T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Senior HRST majors and HRST125
  This course serves as the official capstone for the Human Rights Major. The course covers a variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods as they relate to core subject areas in human rights. The course also covers different approaches to research question development and research design. Students either complete their 1 semester senior projects by the end of the course or progress through the literature review and methods sections of their 2 semester senior thesis (to be completed as an independent study in the Spring of the same year).
3114 POLS-353-01 Authoritarianism 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with HRST
  NOTE: Seat Reservations: 7 Sophomores, 7 Juniors, and 5 Seniors
  This course explores the institutional foundations of authoritarian regimes, the strategies they employ to dominate society, and the dynamics of resistance against authoritarianism with a focus on Eurasia, broadly defined. To this end, the course will examine historic cases of powerful and all-encompassing authoritarian regimes in Germany and Russia, as well as recent manifestations of authoritarianism in the Middle East, Russia, and China. Readings will draw from an array of academic disciplines, including political science, history, philosophy, and sociology.