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Course Listing for HUMAN RIGHTS STUDIES - Fall 2022 (ALL: 09/06/2022 - 12/21/2022)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1883 HRST-125-01 Introduction to Human Rights 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  CD:Not open to Seniors
  NOTE: Seniors will not be allowed to enroll in this class.
  This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world.
2936 HRST-241-01 Human Rights Advocacy 1.00 LEC Bustos, Camila W: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  In the space of seventy-five years, the human rights movement has transformed a utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse, if not practice. This seminar critically evaluates the global (and local) human rights movement(s). Among issues considered are: What does it mean to be a human rights activist? Have advocates adequately incorporated non-western understandings of human rights? What is the role of documentation, of legal advocacy, and of social media in human rights advocacy? How do human rights advocates work with narratives and evidence to maximize impact? What have been, and are today, the most and least effective means used by advocates? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense?
3422 HRST-260-01 Civil Rights to BLM 1.00 LEC Greenberg, Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR Cross-listing: AMST-260-01, HIST-260-01
  Have we entered a new civil rights era? What are this new movement's goals? Who are these new activists and what political beliefs motivate them? How did we get here? This seminar tries to answer these questions by looking backward. Both the strategies and the political analyses of the Movement for Black Lives are rooted in the successes - and failures - of the civil rights movements of the past. We will study the twentieth century's "Long Civil Rights Movement" and consider both continuities and breaks between past and present struggles for racial justice. This course is not open to those who took a similar course at the 300 level.
3434 HRST-312-01 Question of Justice & the Arts 1.00 SEM Aldrete, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  With a study of works from artists and critical readings, this course examines the role of artistic production as a tool to help societies that face extreme conflict and bloodshed in Latin America. How does a society grapple with violence? What does art offer in considering human rights discourse such as a common truth during and after conflict? What is the role of art in the process of "transitional justice?" While this course will pay particular attention to the truth and reconciliation commissions in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Peru, it will also examine other areas of Latin America that have experienced extreme violence, real and symbolic.
2332 HRST-348-01 New Beginnings 1.00 SEM Dworin, Judy
Fisher, Sheila
Matias, Lisa
M: 11:00AM-12:45PM
T: 5:00PM-7:00PM
TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: THDN-348-01
  NOTE: Please contact Professor Judy Dworin (Judy.Dworin@trincoll.edu or judy@jdpp.org) with any questions regarding this class.
  In this seminar, we will investigate the application of the arts to populations with a focus on, but not limited to, urban youth at risk; those incarcerated; families affected by incarceration; and victims of crime. We will look at the role the arts and restorative justice play in a healing and rehabilitative process with these populations, analyzing the mission, goals, action steps, and results through research and hands-on experience. In conjunction with two Hartford-based nonprofit organizations, students will do a significant fieldwork project, entitled New Beginnings, that will include research, participation, and analysis.
1411 HRST-399-01 Human Rights Studies 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
1900 HRST-466-01 Human Rights Teaching Assistnt 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (1.0 course credit)
1518 HRST-497-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term project.
1410 HRST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester).
3318 ENGL-209-01 Prison Literature 1.00 LEC Fisher, Sheila TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course examines texts, both fictional and non-fictional, written about and often in prison. While the course covers a variety of genres and historical periods, the common thread linking all the texts is that their authors were or are incarcerated. Through the works of canonical and non-canonical writers such as Thoreau, Wilde, King, Mandela, Davis, Horton, and currently incarcerated women and men, we will explore how the experience of imprisonment influences individuals, and their family, community, and society and raises questions about freedom, transgression, and human rights. This course will have a community learning component and will introduce students to some of the writers whose works we will be studying. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
3307 HIST-232-01 South Africa/Anti-Apartheid Mv 1.00 SEM Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with HRST
  The creation of the apartheid state in South Africa gave birth to a litany of sociopolitical movements aimed at dismantling a system of white minority rule. In what ways can a digital archive open up a window onto this rich and dynamic history of the anti-antiapartheid movement in South Africa between 1948 and 1994? This course will seek to answer this question by primarily utilizing Aluka's "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa", a collection of over 190,000 primary and secondary sources that shed considerable light on how marginalized peoples and communities sought to realize a democratic alternative to settler colonialism during the era of decolonization in Africa. Topics such as political leadership, nonviolent civil disobedience, coalition building, state repression, armed guerilla resistance, nationalism, international solidarity and truth and reconciliation will inform the ways in which we search for sources of historical evidence contained in Aluka's digital archive.
3286 INTS-358-01 Seminar on Malcolm X 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, HRST Cross-listing: HIST-358-01
  In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will seek to understand the making of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, most popularly known as Malcolm X, one of Black America's most important political leaders of the 20th century. How did Malcolm X define 'world revolution'? To answer this overarching question, we will critically assess autobiographical and biographical texts and academic literature as well as speeches, travel diaries, music, film, and poetry. Our goal is to situate Malcolm X within a Black radical protest tradition by taking into consideration themes and ideas that are pertinent to the study of the worldwide African Diaspora.
2343 POLS-318-01 Statebuilding 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki, Reo TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, INTS
  NOTE: The course is Methodologically Focused. This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for Sophomores, 6 seats reserved for Juniors, and 6 seats reserved for Seniors
  Strong governmental institutions are necessary for providing security, protecting human rights, and advancing material wellbeing. This insight provided the moral justification for the various statebuilding missions the United States and its allies undertook across the globe in the last three decades. However, these efforts to build strong and democratic states have largely ended in failure and suffering. Is statebuiding through foreign intervention and occupation even feasible? If so, is it ethically justifiable? This course examines these and other questions surrounding statebuilding in three parts. First, we examine the factors that led to the development and adoption of the modern state in Europe and elsewhere. Second, we turn our attention to the imposition of modern state institutions onto the rest of the world under colonialism, and the outcomes and legacies of colonial statebuilding in Africa and Asia. Finally, we will discuss the strategic and normative rationales undergirding US and UN-led statebuilding campaigns in the contemporary period.
2314 POLS-353-01 Authoritarianism 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, INTS
  This course explores the institutional foundations of authoritarian regimes, the strategies they employ to dominate society, and the dynamics of resistance against authoritarianism with a focus on Eurasia, broadly defined. To this end, the course will examine historic cases of powerful and all-encompassing authoritarian regimes in Germany and Russia, as well as recent manifestations of authoritarianism in the Middle East, Russia, and China. Readings will draw from an array of academic disciplines, including political science, history, philosophy, and sociology.