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Course Listing for ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - Fall 2024 (ALL: 09/03/2024 - 12/18/2024)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1366 ENVS-112-01 Introduction to Earth Science 1.25 LEC Gourley, Jonathan TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 34 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  The course will introduce students to the basic principles of geology, such as rock and mineral identification, the interpretation of the geological record, and the theory of plate tectonics. These principles will allow us to reconstruct the Earth’s history, to interpret sedimentary records in terms of environmental change, and to assess the impact of human activity on the Earth system. Additional topics include volcanoes and igneous rocks, sedimentary environments, the Earth’s climatic history, the formation of mountain ranges and continents, and an introduction to the Earth’s interior. Two one-day field trips focus on the local geology and the various rock types found within the state.
1367 ENVS-112-20 Introduction to Earth Science 1.25 LAB Gourley, Jonathan W: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  The course will introduce students to the basic principles of geology, such as rock and mineral identification, the interpretation of the geological record, and the theory of plate tectonics. These principles will allow us to reconstruct the Earth’s history, to interpret sedimentary records in terms of environmental change, and to assess the impact of human activity on the Earth system. Additional topics include volcanoes and igneous rocks, sedimentary environments, the Earth’s climatic history, the formation of mountain ranges and continents, and an introduction to the Earth’s interior. Two one-day field trips focus on the local geology and the various rock types found within the state.
1697 ENVS-112-21 Introduction to Earth Science 1.25 LAB Gourley, Jonathan R: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  The course will introduce students to the basic principles of geology, such as rock and mineral identification, the interpretation of the geological record, and the theory of plate tectonics. These principles will allow us to reconstruct the Earth’s history, to interpret sedimentary records in terms of environmental change, and to assess the impact of human activity on the Earth system. Additional topics include volcanoes and igneous rocks, sedimentary environments, the Earth’s climatic history, the formation of mountain ranges and continents, and an introduction to the Earth’s interior. Two one-day field trips focus on the local geology and the various rock types found within the state.
2800 ENVS-141-01 Globl Pers Biodiversty&Conserv 1.00 LEC Pitt, Amber MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This lecture and discussion course focuses on the current biodiversity crisis. We will discuss biological diversity and where it is found and how it is monitored, direct and indirect values of biodiversity, and consequences of biodiversity loss. Topics of discussion will also include the problems of small populations, the politics of endangered species, species invasions and extinctions, and the role of humans in these processes, design and establishment of reserves, captive breeding, and the role that the public and governments play in conserving biological diversity. Not creditable to the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. This course is not open to students who have already received a C- or better in Biology 233 (Conservation Biology).
3337 ENVS-327-01 Religion & Environment Justice 1.00 SEM Koertner, Mareike TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: RELG-327-01
  This course examines various environmental crises that confront humanity today and how these crises are being addressed by religious traditions from around the world, including Catholicism, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, and indigenous traditions in Africa and the Americas. We will look at contemporary case studies for each tradition to explore how activist groups around the world rely on their respective religious teachings as the foundation for their activism toward local, regional, and global environmental justice.
1361 ENVS-375-01 Methds in Environmentl Science 1.25 LEC Pitt, Amber
Joshi, Eureka
MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Science 149L and Chemistry 111L.
  A field-oriented, problem-based course covering data collection and analysis methods commonly used to conduct environmental assessments and to solve environmental problems. This course includes methods for risk assessment, land management and land use history determination, habitat analysis, bio-monitoring, soil composition analysis, soil and water chemistry analysis, and GIS mapping. A strong emphasis is placed upon research design, data manipulation, and statistical analysis, and students are required to complete significant work outside the classroom. As a culminating exercise, students prepare a final report that integrates all the topics and techniques learned throughout the course and that addresses the focal problem. This course is not open to first year students.
1362 ENVS-375-20 Methds in Environmentl Science 1.25 LAB Pitt, Amber
Joshi, Eureka
W: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Science 149L and Chemistry 111L.
  A field-oriented, problem-based course covering data collection and analysis methods commonly used to conduct environmental assessments and to solve environmental problems. This course includes methods for risk assessment, land management and land use history determination, habitat analysis, bio-monitoring, soil composition analysis, soil and water chemistry analysis, and GIS mapping. A strong emphasis is placed upon research design, data manipulation, and statistical analysis, and students are required to complete significant work outside the classroom. As a culminating exercise, students prepare a final report that integrates all the topics and techniques learned throughout the course and that addresses the focal problem. This course is not open to first year students.
1411 ENVS-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1412 ENVS-405-01 Internship in Env Science 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course allows students to meet the integrating experience requirement for the environmental science major through an approved internship. Students who wish to use an internship toward the major must have their integrated internship contract approved by the Environmental Science Program director before the internship is begun. All students undertaking approved internships will be required to keep a detailed log of their activities, prepare a final written report and make an oral presentation of their work to the Environmental Science Program staff and students in order to complete the internship credit.
1420 ENVS-419-01 Research in Env Science Libr 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Students will conduct library research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing this type of independent study should plan on a full semester culminating with the completion of a final formal paper. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1413 ENVS-425-01 Research in Env Science Lab 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan on initiating the work no later than the fall of the senior year, and should also plan on no less than two semesters of study with a final formal report to be submitted to the staff. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1414 ENVS-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (0.5 course credit)
1426 ENVS-497-01 Honors Research 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  An extended paper on the subject of the student's two-semester research project with a professor in environmental science, to be read by three or more members of the program. This course is open only to those environmental science majors who wish to qualify for honors (See paragraph on honors in environmental science in the description of the major). Simultaneous enrollment in Environmental Science 419 or 425 during the spring semester of senior year, submission of the special registration form and approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3314 AMST-219-02 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS Cross-listing: HIST-219-02
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-years, 8 seats for sophomores, 6 seats for juniors across HIST and AMST.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3156 HIST-219-01 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Kete, Kathleen MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3157 HIST-219-02 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS Cross-listing: AMST-219-02
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-years, 8 seats for sophomores, 6 seats for junior across HIST and AMST.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3158 HIST-219-03 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-years, 8 seats for sophomores, 6 seats for juniors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3210 HIST-367-01 Climate and History 1.00 SEM Alejandrino, Clark TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS
  This seminar explores how natural and anthropogenic climate change has shaped human history. We will look at how climate changes, how scholars are reconstructing past climate through interdisciplinary methods, and how changes in climate play a role in effecting political, social, cultural, and technological changes. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a project in historical climate reconstruction and determine its possible implications for how we understand history.