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Course Listing for ENGLISH - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1536 ENGL-101-01 The Practice of Literature 1.00 LEC Wheatley, Chloe M: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - N217 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the critical reflection requirement.
  This course looks at the most fundamental, but also the most difficult, questions about literature: what is literature, exactly? How does literature help us understand the wider world, and what life-long skills does the reading of literature help us develop? Although these questions animate every English course, we all -- professors, students -- answer those questions differently. In this course multiple members of the English Department faculty will visit class and discuss how they approach questions about literature and interpretation. Expect disagreements, and be prepared, in a highly collaborative environment, to express your own strong views. Each year, our readings will be organized around a common theme, which each faculty participant will address. This spring's theme: "Telling Stories." For English majors, this course satisfies the critical reflection requirement.
2321 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Jewett, Chad TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S201 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the survey requirement.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
1044 ENGL-111-01 Lit in the Age of Revolutions 1.00 LEC Rosen, David W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the survey requirement.
  NOTE: This is the same course as ENGL 111 Survey of English Literature II. Students may not receive credit for both courses.
  Over the last three hundred years, the modern world has undergone a series of cataclysmic transformations: the rise of empires, the French revolution, the industrial revolution, the struggles of colonized peoples, and of women, for equality and dignity, the disaster of two World Wars. English literature has been centrally involved in these earth-shattering events: literature is a chronicle of change, and can itself be revolutionary, instigating major change all on its own. In this course, which begins with the rise of modern England, and then looks at major authors of the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and contemporary periods, we will consider what makes English a central world literature.
2577 ENGL-206-01 Sensory Stages 1.00 LEC MacConochie, Alex TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 313 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: THDN-206-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Theater is a multi-sensory art form: spectators watch; audiences listen; actors touch. Drama asks us to attend, in a heightened way, to our senses, the basic interface between self and other, mind and body, player and playgoer. As we’ll see, this focus on sensory experience allows dramatists to ask important questions about embodied experience. In this course, we’ll draw on theater history and theories of performance to explore how drama in English – from medieval street theater to modernism, Shakespeare’s Globe to contemporary America – make use of different sensory techniques in leading audiences to reflect on their cultures’ assumptions about topics such as gender, sexuality, disability, and race. Authors and texts may include medieval mystery plays, Shakespeare, Aphra Behn, Samuel Beckett, Suzan Lori-Parks, and Wole Soyinka.
2322 ENGL-222-01 Victorian Short Fiction 1.00 LEC Bilston, Sarah MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 132 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  The Victorian period is known for its three-decker novels, but the later 19th century was a golden age for short fiction. We will examine the evolution of the short story and the novella, assessing the impact of technological advances in the printing industry, the rise of the cheap periodical, and burgeoning literacy levels. We will also look at the rapid growth of new popular genres, such as science fiction, detective fiction, adventure stories, ghost & horror stories, and feminist “New Woman” fiction. Writers to be studied include Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, Eliza Riddell, Sheridan Le Fanu, Thomas Hardy, Mona Caird, “George Egerton,” and H.G. Wells. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
1437 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Benedict, Barbara MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM LSC - 136 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
1438 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 311 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
1439 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM MacConochie, Alex TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - S205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
2559 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Rosen, David MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
1476 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger, James MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
AAC - 320 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: FILM-265-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screening only.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
1120 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM 115V - WC ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1234 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LIB - 02 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1177 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini, Clare TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM 115V - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for Juniors, ten for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1277 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey, Elizabeth F: 1:15PM-3:55PM 115V - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2482 ENGL-282-01 Contemp Native American Lit 1.00 LEC Wyss, Hilary TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-282-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Indigenous writers have used fiction, autobiography, and poetry to explore what it means to be a Native person today, whether that is in an urban context or on a reservation. From poetry to historical fiction to dystopian futurist science fiction, Native writers celebrate the resistance and survival that has shaped their lives and communities despite a history of colonization. In this course we will examine a selection of works by Native American writers from across the United States and Canada, using these works to gain insight into the ongoing cultural experience of Native people.
2017 ENGL-300-01 Shaping the World 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 205 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course is open to students wishing to fulfill their 200-level elective requirements under petition.
  How do you get from that first scribbled note to the final draft of a story or poem? How do you use the work of other writers as a source of inspiration, a jumping off point? In this course we’ll analyze the craft of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. We’ll read and discuss important recent works in all three genres as well as a mixture of essays, interviews, and articles on craft issues and the writing life. Each week we’ll turn over a different topic, looking at how one aspect of craft operates across these genres. Students will respond to the readings and discussions via papers, creative work, and group work. We’ll also engage established writers in our conversations through class visits and Skype sessions. For English majors, this course is open to students wishing to fulfill their 200-level elective requirements under petition.
2323 ENGL-301-01 From Aristotle to Queer Theory 1.00 SEM Benedict, Barbara MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 137 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course explores the different ways in which literature has been—and can be—interpreted and justified. Students will read critical theories from Platonism to feminism and queer theory, and will apply these theories to selected texts by Shakespeare, Keats, Austen, Conrad, and others in order to define their own literary theory. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
2324 ENGL-305-01 Evolution of the Western Film 1.00 SEM Younger, James MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
HL - 123
AAC - 320
HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. Evening meeting time is for film viewing only. This course is research intensive.
  The course examines how the Western genre emerged from global popular culture at the end of the 19th century to become one of the most powerful and complex forms for expressing the experience of Modernity. After careful consideration of the political and philosophical implications of the Western, we will track the development of the genre as it responds to the ideological contradictions and cultural tensions of 20th-century American history, focusing on broad trends within the mainstream, the contributions of individual directors, and the global dissemination of generic elements. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. Evening meeting time is for screenings only. This course is research intensive.
2326 ENGL-330-01 Sex, Violence, Substance Abuse 1.00 LEC Goldman, Francisco T: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written 1900.
  Some of the greatest and most lasting depictions of México in fiction, non-fiction, cinema and photography have been produced by non-Mexicans. Rather than exposing any lack of significant Mexican creators in all these genres, such works reflect the strong pull, the attraction and at times repulsion, exerted by this complicated country and culture on outsiders. We will choose readings from such twentieth and twenty-first century works such as John Reed's Insurgent México, Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano, DH Lawrence's The Plumed Serpent, Graham Greene's The Power and the Glory, the short-stories of Katherine Anne Porter and Paul Bowles, the novels of B. Traven, Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian, the poetic meditations on Pre-Colombian México by recent French Nobel Prize winner Le Clézio, the contemporary México novels of the Chilean Roberto Bolaño, and, in Ana Castillo’s fiction, a U.S. Chicana's return to México, as well as other contemporary writings. Movies will be chosen from among A Touch of Evil, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, The Wild Bunch, Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, The Night of the Iguana, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, and Sín Nombre. The emphasis will be on the prose, novels especially, with three or four movies, and a class devoted to photography. We study the works themselves, their relation to their own literary-cultural traditions, their depiction of México, and the multiple issues raised by their status as works created by "foreigners." Supplemental readings, some by Mexicans. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
1045 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Goldman, Francisco M: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1121 ENGL-336-01 Adv Cr Writing:Poetry 1.00 SEM Berry, Ciaran TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM 115V - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will do in-class exercises, and write and revise their own poems. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers. This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
2327 ENGL-343-01 Women and Empire 1.00 SEM Bilston, Sarah MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM LSC - 135 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: WMGS-343-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
  This course examines women’s involvement in British imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. What part did ideologies of femininity play in pro-imperialist discourse? In what ways did women writers attempt to "feminize" the imperialist project? What was the relationship between the emerging feminist movement and imperialism at the turn of the 20th century? How have women writers in both centuries resisted imperialist axiomatics? How do women authors from once-colonized countries write about the past? How are post-colonial women represented by contemporary writers? Authors to be studied include Charlotte Brontë, Flora Annie Steel, Rudyard Kipling, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Alexander McCall Smith.
2329 ENGL-346-01 Dream Vision and Romance 1.00 SEM Fisher, Sheila TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM 115V - WC HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
  A study of two major medieval genres as they are developed in the works of Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain-poet, and Malory. The course will explore the structural and stylistic as well as the political, social, and psychological issues raised by these genres and the individual authors' treatments of them. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
2330 ENGL-373-01 Irish Poetry Since Yeats 1.00 SEM Berry, Ciaran MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature after 1900 and a class that emphasizes poetry.
  We’ll consider the blossoming of Irish poetry in English since the foundation of the Irish Free State. Given his centrality to both the state and the art form, we’ll begin by considering the work of W.B. Yeats. From Yeats, we’ll move up through the 20th century, looking at work by Patrick Kavanagh, Louis MacNeice, John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Paul Durcan, Eamon Grennan, Eavan Boland, Paul Muldoon, Ciaran Carson, Vona Groarke, and Sinéad Morrissey. We’ll consider the poems through the lens of Irish independence and cultural identity, the Troubles, tensions over religion and class, the urban/rural divide, and the place of women within the tradition. We will also consider the poems as aesthetic objects, governed by different schools and traditions within the art form, Irish or otherwise. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature after 1900 and a class that emphasizes poetry.
1202 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2550 ENGL-427-01 Sci Fi in the Archives 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel R: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-827-01, AMST-427-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement.
  With the aid of the Loftus E. Becker collection in the Watkinson, this course will explore science fiction as an essential map of our post-war American empire. Fueled by dystopian and utopian impulses, artists like Ursula K. Le Guin and Ted Chiang evolved the genre from technological triumphalism into a devastating critique of a culture invested in weapons of mass destruction, alienating digitalization, and environmental collapse. While we read canonical works of post-1945 American science fiction for their aesthetic elements and ideological functions, we'll also map the genre's tangled publishing history and material traces via archival work at the Watkinson. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2331 ENGL-455-01 Shakespeare and Film 1.00 SEM MacConochie, Alex R: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-855-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  NOTE: Students who have taken English 360 for credit cannot take the new Shakespeare and Film course for credit.
  Shakespeare has long been celebrated for his 'universality': for being "not of an age, but for all time"; for inventing "the human." In this course, we will study selected films adapted from Shakespeare plays as a way to think about this idea of Shakespeare's universality. We will begin by considering what we mean when we say he is universal, and what is at stake in describing Shakespeare as universal. We will then study a handful of Shakespeare plays and their adaptations, some of which translate Shakespeare's plays to different times, places, and sometimes languages. Plays may be selected from Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, 1 Henry IV, Hamlet, King Lear, Cymbeline, and The Tempest.
2484 ENGL-459-01 Orphans and Others in Am Lit 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-859-01, AMST-459-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  From cross-dressing sailors and adventurers to castaways and runaways, early American literature is filled with narratives of reinvention—sometimes by choice, often by necessity. In this course we will look at the peril and promise of such reinvention as various figures reimagine their relation to a social order organized by family lineage and paternal descent. For some the Americas (at least theoretically) presented a world of new possibilities while for others this was a dangerous and isolating place. Our readings will include novels, autobiographical narratives, confessions, and other literary accounts. This seminar is research-intensive.
1203 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2112 ENGL-470-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger, James MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM HL - 123 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: FILM-470-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor. Film screenings to be discussed at the first class meeting.
2489 ENGL-471-01 The Romantic Novel 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine T: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-871-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  British Romanticism is best known for its poetry. In fact, the era’s preeminent novelist, Jane Austen, is often thought to belong more to the eighteenth century than the Romantic era. But as Keats was writing his Odes, British writers, many of them women, energized the novel, a form that would be seen as low and unwholesome well into the reign of Queen Victoria. This class examines the development of the social novel: a genre whose realism reflects social problems and the condition of the nation. We analyze the genre’s harrowing roots in Mary Wollstonecraft’s proto-feminist Maria; the construction of racial difference in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Translation of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah; and the developing interest in labor and industrialization in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South.
2491 ENGL-479-01 Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-479-01, AMST-879-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. English 479 and English 879 are the same course.
  NOTE: Students who have taken English 377 for credit cannot take the new Revolutionary Generations course for credit.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the intense arguments made in the aftermath of independence, and the passionate creative works produced in the wake of revolution. We will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the constitution of American identities in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
2021 ENGL-496-01 Sem: What You Should Have Read 1.00 SEM Fisher, Sheila M: 1:15PM-3:55PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is open to senior English majors only.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a senior project.
  This is your final year as an English major. There are books and authors, that, once upon a time, you thought every English major should have read. You still haven't. One of this seminar's purposes is to let you to do so. One of its other purposes is to ask and answer the question: Why? Why did you think that every English major should have read this book? Why hadn't you? Why has or hasn't the text met your great expectations? We will also be discussing related issues such as canonicity and canon changes, the structure of the English major, and the reasons why you chose it. The students will generate (and debate) the reading list and syllabus. The instructor will generate the requirements.
1232 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
1158 ENGL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Individual tutorial in the writing of a year-long thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Seniors writing year-long, two-credit theses are required to register for the second half of their thesis for the spring of their senior year. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2551 ENGL-827-01 Sci Fi in the Archives 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel R: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-827-01, AMST-427-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  With the aid of the Loftus E. Becker collection in the Watkinson, this course will explore science fiction as an essential map of our post-war American empire. Fueled by dystopian and utopian impulses, artists like Ursula K. Le Guin and Ted Chiang evolved the genre from technological triumphalism into a devastating critique of a culture invested in weapons of mass destruction, alienating digitalization, and environmental collapse. While we read canonical works of post-1945 American science fiction for their aesthetic elements and ideological functions, we'll also map the genre's tangled publishing history and material traces via archival work at the Watkinson. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2332 ENGL-855-01 Shakespeare and Film 1.00 SEM MacConochie, Alex R: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-455-01
  Shakespeare has long been celebrated for his 'universality': for being "not of an age, but for all time"; for inventing "the human." In this course, we will study selected films adapted from Shakespeare plays as a way to think about this idea of Shakespeare's universality. We will begin by considering what we mean when we say he is universal, and what is at stake in describing Shakespeare as universal. We will then study a handful of Shakespeare plays and their adaptations, some of which translate Shakespeare's plays to different times, places, and sometimes languages. Plays may be selected from Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, 1 Henry IV, Hamlet, King Lear, Cymbeline, and The Tempest.
2485 ENGL-859-01 Orphans and Others in Am Lit 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-859-01, AMST-459-01
  From cross-dressing sailors and adventurers to castaways and runaways, early American literature is filled with narratives of reinvention—sometimes by choice, often by necessity. In this course we will look at the peril and promise of such reinvention as various figures reimagine their relation to a social order organized by family lineage and paternal descent. For some the Americas (at least theoretically) presented a world of new possibilities while for others this was a dangerous and isolating place. Our readings will include novels, autobiographical narratives, confessions, and other literary accounts. This seminar is research-intensive.
2490 ENGL-871-01 The Romantic Novel 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine T: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-471-01
  British Romanticism is best known for its poetry. In fact, the era’s preeminent novelist, Jane Austen, is often thought to belong more to the eighteenth century than the Romantic era. But as Keats was writing his Odes, British writers, many of them women, energized the novel, a form that would be seen as low and unwholesome well into the reign of Queen Victoria. This class examines the development of the social novel: a genre whose realism reflects social problems and the condition of the nation. We analyze the genre’s harrowing roots in Mary Wollstonecraft’s proto-feminist Maria; the construction of racial difference in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Translation of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah; and the developing interest in labor and industrialization in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South.
2492 ENGL-879-01 Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-479-01, AMST-879-01
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the intense arguments made in the aftermath of independence, and the passionate creative works produced in the wake of revolution. We will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the constitution of American identities in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
1314 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1173 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
1157 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
1168 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2573 JWST-223-01 American Jewish Lit Since 1865 1.00 LEC Pozorski, Aimee TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - T302 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL
  This course begins with a question: How would one characterize or define the tradition of American Jewish literature since 1865 – the period following the Civil War that also necessarily accounts for the first and second world wars, the polio and AIDS crises in America, U.S. responses to the Holocaust, and ongoing questions about how to balance assimilation with maintaining one’s ethnic identity in U.S. cities large and small. Through close reading of the works of eight canonical American Jewish writers (two poets, two short story writers, two dramatist, and two novelists), we will consider such questions as: What makes these works Jewish? What makes these works American? What makes these works literary?
1981 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber, Robert T: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - N129  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL, FILM
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.