blank
Select a level:
Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.
blank

Course Listing for ECONOMICS - Spring 2023 (ALL: 01/25/2023 - 05/12/2023)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1068 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark, Carol MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better must be earned the first time a student takes Economics 101 to meet the requirement for the Economics major. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students. 10 seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1856 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Tomolonis, Paul TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better must be earned the first time a student takes Economics 101 to meet the requirement for the Economics major. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students. 10 seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1069 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Zelada-Aprili, Raul MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better must be earned the first time a student takes Economics 101 to meet the requirement for the Economics major. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students. 10 seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1854 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Zelada-Aprili, Raul MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better must be earned the first time a student takes Economics 101 to meet the requirement for the Economics major. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students. 10 seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1205 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Halladay, Brianna MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better must be earned the first time a student takes Economics 101 to meet the requirement for the Economics major. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students. 10 seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1782 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Halladay, Brianna MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better must be earned the first time a student takes Economics 101 to meet the requirement for the Economics major. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students. 10 seats are reserved for juniors and seniors.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1367 ECON-103-01 Fundamentals of Accounting 1.00 LEC Grealis, Tara MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Senior economics and coordinate majors have first choice for enrollment, then junior economics and coordinate majors, then sophomores. Senior and junior non-majors need permission of instructor.
  A review of accounting concepts and procedures, with particular emphasis on the reasoning behind methods of measuring and recording such items as depreciation and revenues. The implications of accounting theory and practice for the measurement of income and financial positions are investigated.
2958 ECON-217-01 Econ of Health & Health Care 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 seats for sophomores.
  Analysis of the structure of health care markets using economic principles Evaluation of current health care policies and their effects on cost, access and quality. Topics covered include the production of and demand for health and medical care; information asymmetries between patients, doctors, and payers; health insurance coverage; the effects of managed care (including HMOs) on competition, efficiency, and quality; training and practice of physicians; hospitals; prescription drug pricing; government regulations; Medicare and Medicaid; health care reform.
1333 ECON-218-01 Intro to Stats for Econ 1.00 LEC Bouazza, Hanae TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 or permission of instructor.
  As data and computing resources have become increasingly accessible, economics has become more concerned with measurement and estimation of economic phenomena. This course is designed to familiarize students with common statistical methods used in economics. Topics will include the presentation of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.
2959 ECON-221-01 Central Bank & Fin Markets 1.00 LEC Comert, Hasan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 seats for sophomores.
  Since the 1980s, financial systems in developing and developed countries have been evolving with enormous speed. During this period, central banking in many countries underwent several important changes too. The financial system and central banking cannot be understood independently of one another. On the one hand, central banking policy choices and the regulatory framework affect the financial system. On the other hand the effectiveness of central banking policies is determined by developments in the financial system. Recently, central bankers and monetary theorists have been forced to reconsider their theories and practices in response to the global financial This class focuses on the co-evolution of central banking and financial markets and the very recent changes in central banking theories and practices.
2960 ECON-224-01 Macroeconomics and Inequality 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MW: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 seats for sophomores.
  US economic inequality is at record levels and is substantially greater than inequality in most other industrialized nations. This course develops key aspects of the inequality debate: how economic inequality is defined and measured, as well as the causes of income inequality in US economy and society. Topics covered will also include the macroeconomic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and it's impact on the level of inequality.
3100 ECON-229-01 The Economics of Urban Growth 1.00 LEC Keshawarz, Osman TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 seats for sophomores.
  What role does land and housing play in the economic growth of cities? What are the causes and consequences of government intervention in markets for land and housing? In this course, we will look at the role that real estate markets play in determining economic outcomes, the role of land use policy, the history of urban development, segregation, gentrification, and the role of housing markets and policy in generating economic inequality. We will start by examining theories of urban growth and use these frameworks to understand the development of housing markets in the United States and abroad.
2961 ECON-252-01 Big Data and Economics 1.00 LEC Jogani, Chitra TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 seats for sophomores.
  With the rise of the internet, social media, and technology, there has been a shift in the availability and the power of data. Economists now have access to "big data" that can play a role in increasing economic activity and living standards. Examples include the development of new goods and services and faster innovation through a shorter research and development cycle, as a result of more and better data. Other benefits could affect our quality of life: fewer traffic jams and easier price comparisons. This course explores both the ways that "big data" has changed our understanding of the economy as well as the ethical issues related to the collection and use of these data.
2530 ECON-299-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1784 ECON-301-01 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Grossberg, Adam TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a junior or senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
1785 ECON-301-02 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Grossberg, Adam TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a junior or senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
1022 ECON-302-01 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Bent, Peter MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a junior or senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
1023 ECON-302-02 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a junior or senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
2955 ECON-302-03 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a junior or senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
2962 ECON-303-01 Labor Economics 1.00 LEC Grossberg, Adam TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020
  An examination of a number of important issues in modern labor economics. Topics include (but are not limited to): the determinants of labor supply, with special emphasis on the growth of women's labor supply during the last century; the demand for labor and the determination of wages; discrimination in labor markets.
3101 ECON-305-01 Urban Economics 1.00 LEC Keshawarz, Osman TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020
  The world's population is becoming increasingly urbanized, a trend which creates economic opportunities and challenges for individuals, businesses, and governments. This course will introduce students to economic models that explain why cities form, why commercial and residential land use patterns look the way they do, and how economic reasoning can inform policies addressed at urban problems, such as traffic congestion, housing affordability, crime, and homelessness. In addition, we will study how public policies such as zoning and the provision of mass transit can help remedy market failures in the urban setting. The supply and demand model and the economic theories of the consumer and the firm will be the main tools of analysis, as will ideas from public economics such as externalities and public goods.
3121 ECON-306-01 Public Finance 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020
  An examination of the role of tax and public expenditure policies as they influence the allocation and distribution of resources, and on the role of market imperfections as rationales for government policies. Emphasis is on the effects of taxation and public spending on consumer and producer choices.
2963 ECON-307-01 Health Economics 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020
  This course will study the characteristics of the U.S. health care system and the functioning of the health care market using the tools of microeconomic theory. The aim of the course will be to discuss specific topics in the economics of health, including: the analysis of the causes of health-related behaviors such as obesity and substance abuse; the characteristics of the health care industry and how it is affected by insurance and medical technology; and the impact of government policies on health related behaviors and the provision of medical care. The role of preventive measures and the efficient use of limited healthcare resources will be examined in light of the recent health care reform and in light of their broader implications for public policy.
1786 ECON-312-01 Mathematical Economics 1.00 LEC Flaherty, Michael TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or 302, and a C- or better in Mathematics 131.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course is designed to introduce students to the application of mathematical concepts and techniques to economic problems and economic theory.
1254 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken Spring 2020
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
1318 ECON-318-01 Basic Econometrics with Lab 1.25 LEC Zannoni, Diane MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  NOTE: Students must enroll in both the lecture and lab.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. Students must also enroll in the required lab for this course.
1327 ECON-318-20 Basic Econometrics with Lab 1.25 LAB Zannoni, Diane TBA TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  NOTE: Students must enroll in both the lecture and lab.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. Students must also enroll in the required lab for this course.
1855 ECON-327-01 Game Theory 1.00 LEC Schneider, Arthur TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020
  This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of Game Theory. The main topics include: cooperative and noncooperative games; Nash equilibrium and alternatives to Nash equilibrium; prisoner's dilemma; sequential games with perfect and imperfect information; evolutionary and experimental game theory; Bayesian games; and bargaining games. We will also explore the role of social preferences in explaining behavior.
2964 ECON-328-02 Appld Econ: Time-Series Ana 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302 and a C- or better in Economics 318 .
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken Spring 2020
  This course deals with econometric methods and problems that arise when data consists of observations on one or several variables over time. Topics include: autocorrelation, distributed lag and autoregressive models, ARIMA models, co-integration, and vector autoregressive correction models.
2965 ECON-336-01 The Market for Green Goods 1.00 LEC Ahmed, Rasha TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020
  In many contexts, environmental and social damages can be significantly reduced if consumers substitute towards a greener version of the given products, e.g. organic food, energy efficient appliances, and green diamonds. The course will investigate alternative methods to promote green goods markets. These methods range from regulation to purely voluntary approaches taken by a firm or an entire industry. In addition, the course investigates the role of market competition, technological advances, product labeling and firm image in the development of green markets. The analysis involves the use of microeconomic theory as well as several case studies.
2339 ECON-350-01 Reading & Writing about Macro 1.00 LEC Bent, Peter MW: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  How do economists write about macroeconomic issues for different audiences? How do they craft and communicate arguments that will help to shape macroeconomic policy? This course will introduce students to some of today's most important macroeconomic issues and how economists discuss, debate and write about those issues. After reading and engaging critically with essays from books and articles from both academic and popular journals, students will be asked to develop their own essays and demonstrate their ability to think creatively and express economic ideas clearly in writing. The format of the course will lend itself to extensive feedback on student writing and opportunities to share student work with a broader audience.
1157 ECON-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken Spring 2020.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1224 ECON-401-01 Ind Study in Quantitative Apps 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 312 or Economics 318
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1765 ECON-403-01 Senior Thesis Seminar Part II 0.50 SEM Ahmed, Rasha TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This seminar will address the research and thesis writing process and will include workshops on writing, data and library resources. In addition, students will be asked to present preliminary work for discussion to seminar participants, and to participate in three sets of presentations to the Department during the academic year.
2966 ECON-431-33 Central Banking and Inflation 1.00 SEM Comert, Hasan T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken Spring 2020
  This seminar provides a critical analysis of the rationale, behavior, and effectiveness of central banking and alternative monetary institutions. It will emphasize the Federal Reserve System and alternative monetary arrangements from historical and analytical standpoints, treating in detail the formulation and execution of monetary policy in the context of both domestic and international constraints. Attention also is given to the European Monetary Union and current issues in international monetary relations.
3097 ECON-431-34 Central Banking and Inflation 1.00 SEM Comert, Hasan W: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken Spring 2020
  This seminar provides a critical analysis of the rationale, behavior, and effectiveness of central banking and alternative monetary institutions. It will emphasize the Federal Reserve System and alternative monetary arrangements from historical and analytical standpoints, treating in detail the formulation and execution of monetary policy in the context of both domestic and international constraints. Attention also is given to the European Monetary Union and current issues in international monetary relations.
2967 ECON-431-37 Topics in Urban Economics 1.00 SEM Ahmed, Rasha TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken Spring 2020
  Students will explore selected topics in Urban Economics such as crime, education, social contagion, housing, etc.
1748 ECON-431-51 Experimental Economics 1.00 SEM Schneider, Arthur TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken spring 2020. Please contact Professor Arthur Schneider at arthur.schneider@trincoll.edu for a pin to this senior seminar.
  This seminar will introduce students to applications of experiments in economic research, focusing on many well-developed areas of laboratory-tested experiments as well as experimental methodology. We will review, discuss, and analyze some of the most influential papers written in the field of Experimental Economics and conduct classroom experiments. We will examine the motivation behind experiments, their usefulness and their limitations. This course will include topics such as experiments involving individual decision making, game theory, bargaining, trust and public choice. Finally, students will be required to develop and conduct their own experiment-based research projects.
3084 ECON-431-65 Long Run Economic Growth 1.00 SEM Bent, Peter MW: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken Spring 2020
  The graph of global economic output per capita over the past couple millennia is often likened to a hockey stick: centuries of essentially flat average growth, and then exponential growth from the Industrial Revolution onward. But can this trend continue? The shift to unprecedented economic growth has been accompanied by instability and crisis. Additionally, there are concerns around stagnating growth. Recent studies of the headwinds facing economic growth have focused on issues as wide-ranging as secular stagnation, debates about productivity and automation, demographic shifts, and sustainability and de-growth. This seminar explores these and related issues over the long run, drawing on sources spanning economic history and contemporary macroeconomics.
1158 ECON-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. Cannot be used for major credit. (0.5 - 1 course credit)
3083 ECON-490-01 Research Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake substantial research work with a faculty member. Students need to complete a special registration form, available online, and have it signed by the supervising instructor.
1159 ECON-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302.
  NOTE: This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Economics major.
  NOTE: C-, P or better in Economics 301/302 if taken Spring 2020.
  Written report and formal presentation of a research project. Open to all senior majors and required of all students who wish to earn honors in Economics. A student who intends to write a thesis must locate a thesis adviser, and must submit a preliminary proposal to the thesis adviser by the last day of classes in the spring semester of the junior year. A final proposal must be submitted to the thesis adviser by final registration in the fall semester of the senior year. Submission date of the thesis is the third Thursday following Spring Recess. Seniors who undertake Economics 498-99 will be excused from Economics 431, Studies in Social Policies and Economic Research. In addition to the final proposal, submission of the special registration form available in the Registrar's Office and the approval of the instructor is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)