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Course Listing for ECONOMICS - Spring 2021 (ALL: 02/08/2021 - 05/17/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1090 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag, Christopher MW: 8:05AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
2200 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag, Christopher MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1091 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Jogani, Chitra MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
2401 ECON-103-01 Fundamentals of Accounting 1.00 LEC Tomolonis, Paul TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Senior economics and coordinate majors have first choice for enrollment, then junior economics and coordinate majors, then sophomores. Senior and junior non-majors need permission of instructor.
  A review of accounting concepts and procedures, with particular emphasis on the reasoning behind methods of measuring and recording such items as depreciation and revenues. The implications of accounting theory and practice for the measurement of income and financial positions are investigated.
2086 ECON-210-90 Contemporary Micro Issues 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for Sophomore and First Year Students
  This course covers economic decision-making by individuals, firms and factor markets, and the role of government in designing economic policy and its impact on individuals. Topics include: Price discrimination; cartels, oligopolies, and monopolistic competition; economics of network goods; labor markets; public goods; political economy; economics, ethics and public policy; incentives; stock markets and consumer choice. Some of the questions we will try to answer among others are: Is in-state vs out-of-state tuition an example of price discrimination? Can OPEC nations collude to force up the price of oil? Why do friends so often enjoy the same musical songs? Why is it that the world is running out of so many kinds of fish? Are markets fair?
2708 ECON-210-91 Contemporary Micro Issues 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for Sophomore and First Year Students
  This course covers economic decision-making by individuals, firms and factor markets, and the role of government in designing economic policy and its impact on individuals. Topics include: Price discrimination; cartels, oligopolies, and monopolistic competition; economics of network goods; labor markets; public goods; political economy; economics, ethics and public policy; incentives; stock markets and consumer choice. Some of the questions we will try to answer among others are: Is in-state vs out-of-state tuition an example of price discrimination? Can OPEC nations collude to force up the price of oil? Why do friends so often enjoy the same musical songs? Why is it that the world is running out of so many kinds of fish? Are markets fair?
2403 ECON-217-01 Econ of Health & Health Care 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for Sophomore and First Year Students
  Analysis of the structure of health care markets using economic principles Evaluation of current health care policies and their effects on cost, access and quality. Topics covered include the production of and demand for health and medical care; information asymmetries between patients, doctors, and payers; health insurance coverage; the effects of managed care (including HMOs) on competition, efficiency, and quality; training and practice of physicians; hospitals; prescription drug pricing; government regulations; Medicare and Medicaid; health care reform.
2003 ECON-243-01 Fin Mkts & Institutions 1.00 LEC Hoag, Christopher TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for Sophomore and First Year Students
  The purpose of the course is to provide a basic understanding of the role of financial institutions (intermediaries) and financial markets in facilitating the flow of funds between those who supply funds and those who demand funds. Topics include the role of banks, other financial institutions, and financial markets in this process. Special attention is also given to the European Monetary Union and other aspects of the international financial system.
2567 ECON-299-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2755 ECON-301-01 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo MW: 3:55PM-5:35PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
2400 ECON-301-02 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a rising junior or rising senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
2004 ECON-301-90 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Ahmed, Rasha MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a rising junior or rising senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
2005 ECON-301-91 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Ahmed, Rasha MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a rising junior or rising senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
2796 ECON-302-01 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Zannoni, Diane MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a rising junior or rising senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
1038 ECON-302-90 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Comert, Hasan MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a rising junior or rising senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
1039 ECON-302-91 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Comert, Hasan MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you are a rising junior or rising senior and not a declared major in economics, you will be dropped from this class.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
2863 ECON-306-90 Public Finance 1.00 LEC Padovano, Fabio MW: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  An examination of the role of tax and public expenditure policies as they influence the allocation and distribution of resources, and on the role of market imperfections as rationales for government policies. Emphasis is on the effects of taxation and public spending on consumer and producer choices.
1427 ECON-307-01 Health Economics 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo MW: 8:05AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  This course will study the characteristics of the U.S. health care system and the functioning of the health care market using the tools of microeconomic theory. The aim of the course will be to discuss specific topics in the economics of health, including: the analysis of the causes of health-related behaviors such as obesity and substance abuse; the characteristics of the health care industry and how it is affected by insurance and medical technology; and the impact of government policies on health related behaviors and the provision of medical care. The role of preventive measures and the efficient use of limited healthcare resources will be examined in light of the recent health care reform and in light of their broader implications for public policy.
2407 ECON-308-01 Industrial Organization 1.00 LEC Schneider, Arthur TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301. (Calculus is recommended, but not required)
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  The course is divided into two parts. The first part consists of an examination of the structure of American industry including a critical analysis of the empirical evidence underlying the extent of competition, oligopoly, and monopoly within the United States. Comparisons are made with other industrialized nations and a number of specific industries are examined in detail. The second part of the course consists of an examination of public policy toward monopoly with specific emphasis on regulation and antitrust policies.
2589 ECON-310-90 Money & Banking 1.00 LEC Comert, Hasan MW: 8:05AM-9:45AM N/A GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  An analysis of monetary theory, institutions and policy including the nature, role and significance of money, financial markets and institutions, commercial banking and the money supply process, the Federal Reserve System, and the formulation and implementation of monetary policy, monetary theory, and related policy issues.
2762 ECON-312-01 Mathematical Economics 1.00 LEC Stater, Mark TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or 302, and a C- or better in Mathematics 126 or Mathematics 131.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course is designed to introduce students to the application of mathematical concepts and techniques to economic problems and economic theory.
1303 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
2859 ECON-318-90 Basic Econometrics 1.00 LEC Zannoni, Diane MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. The computer will be used but no experience is necessary.
2408 ECON-323-01 Theories of Econ Growth 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course is concerned with the long-run economic growth of modern economies. Topics includes the measurement of real living standards, the Solow model of capital accumulation, models of technological change and innovation, the role of trade in fostering growth, the effect of population growth on economic growth, the influence of economic growth on natural resources, and questions about why some countries are affluent while others remain poor.
2197 ECON-327-01 Game Theory 1.00 LEC Schneider, Arthur TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  Game theory is the study of strategic interaction, built on realistic assumptions about people’s capacity for strategic thinking. The course will begin with an overview of standard game theory; for this reason, no prior knowledge of game theory is necessary. Motivated by field and experimental evidence, students will study alternatives to Nash equilibrium, including cognitive hierarchy models, quantal response equilibrium, and cursed equilibrium. We will also explore the role of social preferences in explaining behavior in strategic environments. Additionally, we will apply psychological biases that are found in individual decision-making, such as framing effects and overconfidence, to strategic situations. We will use these ideas in a variety of economic applications, including auctions and school choice.
2627 ECON-328-02 Appld Econ: Time-Series Ana 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel WF: 2:00PM-3:15PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302 and a C- or better in Economics 318 .
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course deals with econometric methods and problems that arise when data consists of observations on one or several variables over time. Topics include: autocorrelation, distributed lag and autoregressive models, ARIMA models, co-integration, and vector autoregressive correction models.
2411 ECON-334-90 Law and Economics 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020
  Legal rules of property, contract and tort law create implicit prices that incentivize individuals behavior and motivate the economic approach to the study of law. This course brings together the two disciplines of economics and law to examine fundamental rules governing an exchange economy. Topics to be covered include property law, tort law (non-criminal harm or injuries), contract law and crime. Please note, this is not a course in law but in economic analysis of the law.
2563 ECON-339-01 Cont Macro Issues 1.00 LEC Zelada-Aprili, Raul MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken in spring 2020.
  Recent events have raised many questions for macroeconomists about the way the economy works and the design of macroeconomic policy. This course examines a variety of contemporary macroeconomic issues from competing theoretical perspectives. Topics include: the macroeconomics of pandemics, fiscal policy and monetary policy; income inequality; technological change and unemployment; macroeconomics and the environment.
2697 ECON-339-02 Cont Macro Issues 1.00 LEC Zelada-Aprili, Raul MW: 11:55AM-1:35PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 302 if taken in spring 2020.
  Recent events have raised many questions for macroeconomists about the way the economy works and the design of macroeconomic policy. This course examines a variety of contemporary macroeconomic issues from competing theoretical perspectives. Topics include: the macroeconomics of pandemics, fiscal policy and monetary policy; income inequality; technological change and unemployment; macroeconomics and the environment.
2909 ECON-340-90 Practice of Macroeconomics 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  During the course, students will be guided through case studies on significant macroeconomic policy questions in the United States from the past decade. In each case, they will examine how policymakers and their preferred theories were empowered and constrained by history, law, and institutions. Students will be taught to use data to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed policies. The objectives are for students to improve their writing and research capabilities, conduct an independent project assessing a policy or macroeconomic problem of their choice, and build fluency in contemporary policy discussions within the economics community.
2910 ECON-341-90 African Economic History 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TBA N/A SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302.
  This course examines the major theories and debates in the study of economic growth and development in Africa since 1500. It focuses on the region's shifting role in the world economy. It covers the following topics: gender and racial inequality, the impact of the slave trade, European colonization, state-led industrialization, currency unions, sovereign debt crises and structural adjustment policies like privatization of state-owned enterprises and trade liberalization.
2779 ECON-350-01 Reading & Writing about Macro 1.00 LEC Bent, Peter MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better if Economics 302 if taken Spring 2020.
  How do economists write about macroeconomic issues for different audiences? How do they craft and communicate arguments that will help to shape macroeconomic policy? This course will introduce students to some of today's most important macroeconomic issues and how economists discuss, debate and write about those issues. After reading and engaging critically with essays from books and articles from both academic and popular journals, students will be asked to develop their own essays and demonstrate their ability to think creatively and express economic ideas clearly in writing. The format of the course will lend itself to extensive feedback on student writing and opportunities to share student work with a broader audience.
1187 ECON-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1259 ECON-401-01 Ind Study in Quantitative Apps 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 312 or Economics 318
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2412 ECON-403-01 Senior Thesis Seminar Part II 0.50 SEM Ahmed, Rasha TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This seminar will address the research and thesis writing process and will include workshops on writing, data and library resources. In addition, students will be asked to present preliminary work for discussion to seminar participants, and to participate in three sets of presentations to the Department during the academic year.
2629 ECON-431-36 How Economies Grow 1.00 SEM Zelada-Aprili, Raul TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course will focus on the mechanics of economic growth, technological change, demand constraints to growth, and sources of income and growth differences between countries. In addition to exploring the theoretical foundations of economic growth, this course will explore a range of country-specific case studies that exemplify different growth strategies and trajectories across time.
1933 ECON-431-51 Experimental Economics 1.00 SEM Schneider, Arthur MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This seminar will introduce students to applications of experiments in economic research, focusing on many well-developed areas of laboratory-tested experiments as well as experimental methodology. We will review, discuss, and analyze some of the most influential papers written in the field of Experimental Economics and conduct classroom experiments. We will examine the motivation behind experiments, their usefulness and their limitations. This course will include topics such as experiments involving individual decision making, game theory, bargaining, trust and public choice. Finally, students will be required to develop and conduct their own experiment-based research projects.
2628 ECON-431-64 Economics of Sports 1.00 SEM Helming, Troy MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This seminar uses both theoretical and empirical economic analysis to examine numerous issues from the world of sports. We will utilize a wide range of economic modeling techniques to study a variety of academic papers that research how rational decision makers respond to economic incentives in various sporting contexts. Topics of study include: organizational structure of sports leagues; uncertainty of outcome hypothesis and competitive balance; pricing of naming and broadcasting rights; antitrust in sports leagues; stadium financing; the economic impact of sporting events; the sports labor market; and elements of sports contracts.
1188 ECON-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. Cannot be used for major credit.
2570 ECON-490-01 Research Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is designed to provide economics students with the opportunity to undertake substantial (collaborative) economics and/or econometrics work with a full-time economics faculty member. Students need to complete a special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office and have it signed by the supervising instructor. With permission, students may apply up to one credit toward major requirements.
1189 ECON-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302.
  NOTE: This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Economics major.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  Written report and formal presentation of a research project. Open to all senior majors and required of all students who wish to earn honors in Economics. A student who intends to write a thesis must locate a thesis adviser, and must submit a preliminary proposal to the thesis adviser by the last day of classes in the spring semester of the junior year. A final proposal must be submitted to the thesis adviser by final registration in the fall semester of the senior year. Submission date of the thesis is the third Thursday following Spring Recess. Seniors who undertake Economics 498-99 will be excused from Economics 431, Studies in Social Policies and Economic Research. In addition to the final proposal, submission of the special registration form available in the Registrar's Office and the approval of the instructor is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
1931 MATH-131-90 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Schuerger, Houston MWF: 6:15PM-7:30PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1988 MATH-131-91 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Schuerger, Houston MWF: 8:30AM-9:45AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2736 MATH-207-03 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Evans, Kyle MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON Cross-listing: MATH-207-92
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1551 MATH-207-90 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2392 MATH-207-91 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC McCurdy, Matthew MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2737 MATH-207-92 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Evans, Kyle MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON Cross-listing: MATH-207-03
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.