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Course Listing for CLASSICAL STUDIES - Spring 2024 (ALL: 01/22/2024 - 05/10/2024)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1193 CLAS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available on the Registrar’s Office website, is required for enrollment.
3027 CLAS-402-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  A continuation of Classics 401 for students pursuing honors in the Classics major. Submission of the special registration form and the approval of the chair are required.
1194 CLAS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (0.5 course credit)
2969 CLCV-104-01 Mythology 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for 1st-Year students, 12 for sophomores, and 8 for Classical Studies majors
  Generally, this course is a study of the role of myth in society; particularly, the emphasis will be laid on the body of Greek myth and its relationship to literature and art. Readings within the area of classical literature will be wide and varied, with a view to elucidating what "myth" meant to the ancient Greeks. Whatever truths are discovered will be tested against the apparent attitudes of other societies, ancient and modern, toward myth. Lectures and discussion.
2772 CLCV-111-01 Intro Classical Art/Archaeolgy 1.00 LEC Risser, Martha TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ARTHISTORY, URST
  NOTE: Seat Reservations: 10 for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 7 for Classical Studies majors.
  A survey of the art and archaeology of the classical world, from the Neolithic period through the Roman Empire. Topics of discussion include sculpture, pottery, painting, architecture, town planning, burial practices, and major monuments, as well as archaeological method and theory.
2774 CLCV-222-01 Ancient Mediterranean Cities 1.00 LEC Risser, Martha TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: URST-222-01
  NOTE: 1 seats reserved for Classical Studies majors, 3 for first years, 4 for sophomores.
  This course traces ancient urbanism from the development of Neolithic sedentism to the massive cities of the Hellenistic kingdoms and the Roman Empire. We will examine both primary and secondary texts, together with evidence from art and archaeology, to assemble a composite view of urban life and the environmental, topographical, political, cultural, and economic factors that shaped some of the most impressive cities ever built, many of which remain major metropolitan centers today.
2991 CLCV-253-01 Abolition and Enslavement 1.00 LEC Dugan, Kelly TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 8 seats for 1st-Year students, 8 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for Classical Studies majors.
  Abolition is often treated as a modern phenomenon. In contrast, ancient literature bears witness to thousands of years of abolition and anti-enslavement ideologies. In this class, students will learn about abolitionism and enslavement from antiquity to modernity. Together, students will study the ancient resources on abolition and enslavement, understand the structures and shifts of these social systems, and examine the related systems that we see today. We will engage with primary sources including the words of formerly enslaved authors such as Terence Afer (ca. 195-159 BCE). This course will engage students in the ongoing conversations and action happening today regarding the long-standing history of abolition and anti-enslavement. There will be daily activities, a midterm project, and final project. No ancient language knowledge necessary to succeed in this course.
3079 CLCV-447-01 New Troy 1.00 SEM Staples, James R: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-847-01, ENGL-447-01
  After the ancient city of Troy fell-so the story goes-Trojans arrived on the island of Albion, a paradise far in the westernmost reaches of their known world. After slaughtering the indigenous giants, the Trojans claimed the island, renamed it Britain, and thus established a New Troy. Troy captivated the medieval imagination, representing the highest realization of "civilization." Medieval poets, however, also brought attention to the supremacist violence of this civilizing process by focusing on the women, the giants, and others who met tragic ends as a result. We will consider medieval accounts of Troy-such as Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and Troy's Arthurian afterlives-alongside postcolonial theory, Critical Race and Indigenous studies, queer and feminist theory, and ecocriticism to develop this critique.
1015 CLCV-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Dugan, Kelly TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (0.5 - 1 course credit)
1346 GREK-101-01 Intro Class & Biblical Greek I 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  A course in the fundamentals of classical Greek, designed for those who begin the language in college.
1051 LATN-102-01 Intermed Grammar Reading Latin 1.00 LEC Dugan, Kelly MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 101; or equivalent score on the Latin placement exam as determined by the Classics Department; or permission of the instructor
  This course begins with a brief review of material covered in LAT101, then proceeds to cover complex subordinate clauses involving the subjunctive, indirect statement, and varieties of participial constructions, in addition to further vocabulary acquisition. Students begin to read passages from ancient Latin literature, such as Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars, Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, the Res Gestae of Augustus Caesar, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
2773 LATN-325-01 Livy's History of Rome 1.00 SEM Risser, Martha TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 203; or equivalent score on the Latin placement exam as determined by the Classics Department; or permission of the instructor
  This course introduces students to selections from Livy's magnum opus Ab urbe condita, which treated Roman history from the fall of Troy down to the author's lifetime, as the Roman Republic gave way to Augustus' new Roman Empire. In addition to gaining familiarity with Livy's prose style and the distinction between history and historiography, we will consider the interpretations of recent translators, the apparatus criticus, scholarly commentary, and select secondary literature.
2403 LATN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available online, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. Guidelines are available in the College Bulletin. (0.5 - 1 course credit)
2766 RELG-212-01 New Testament 1.00 LEC Hornung, Gabriel TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSICS
  An examination of the New Testament in the context of the first century C.E. to study the formation and themes of these early Christian writings. The course will stress the analysis of texts and discussion of their possible interpretations. How did the earliest writings about Jesus present him? Who was Paul? Is it more accurate to call him the founder of Christianity instead of Jesus? How do we understand Gospels that are not in the New Testament? We will attend to these and other social, political, and historical issues for studying the New Testament and Early Christianity.