Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - Summer 2021 (Q2: 07/06/2021 - 08/05/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1083 AHIS-271-90 The Arts of the United States 1.00 LEC Curran, Kathleen TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A ART Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The course examines key artistic periods of American painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts from the colonial settlements to the turn of the twentieth century (ca. 1650-1900). We begin with the colonial period and the rise of portraiture and history painting during the American Revolution, witnessing how artists like John Singleton Copley forge an indigenous American style. We then focus on genre as well as landscape painting, where we explore themes of politics, race, and reverence for the land. The class examines the American coming of age at the close of the Civil War and examines the careers of such artists as Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, the American Impressionists, and architects H.H. Richardson and McKim, Mead & White.
1079 AMST-298-90 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway, Nicholas MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
1080 AMST-329-90 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway, Nicholas TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
1077 ANTH-101-90 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry, Timothy TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB5 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1078 ANTH-261-90 Political Violence in SE Asia 1.00 LEC Conroe, Andrew TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A GLB Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Southeast Asia has been both a subject of anthropological fascination and the location of some of the worst mass political violence of the 20th century. In this class, we will explore, discuss, and critique some of the ways in which this violence has been represented and rendered ethnographically. Students will get a general understanding of anthropological approaches to political violence, and—drawing on a variety of case studies from Indonesia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Timor Leste, and elsewhere-- a sense of the particular histories and dynamics of violence in Southeast Asia. Assignments for the class will include regular discussion questions, short response papers, in-class presentations, a midterm essay, and an individual research project.
1084 COLL-113-90 Introduction to Epidemiology 1.00 LEC Cancelled SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles of epidemiology, defined as the study of how disease and injury are distributed in populations, and the factors that influence that distribution. Concepts covered will include measuring morbidity and mortality, study design, association to causation, and ethical and policy considerations. Class time will be divided into lecture and virtual group exercises, using literature, cinema, and public events as prompts for discussion. Students at all levels are welcome.
1086 ENGL-429-90 19th Century Short Fiction 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-829-90
  NOTE: For English majors, satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  This course will mark the development of the American short story as a significant literary form throughout the 19th century. From canonical stalwarts like Washington Irving and Henry James to under-covered writers like Grace King and Alice Dunbar-Nelson, the short story became a space for aesthetic innovation and ideological expression. As both a publishing phenomenon in print culture and a crucial object of contemporary critical discourse, the short story can reveal much about the practices and powers of literary history. Our reading will introduce the methods of literary scholarship, including interpretive analysis; summarizing and contextualizing critical positions; identifying, locating, evaluating and citing scholarly resources; developing research within a critical conversation; composing persuasive arguments; and designing research plans for larger projects.
1096 ENVS-282-01 Drone Flight School 1.00 LEC Cancelled Q2
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) or drones have quickly emerged as a new way to explore the world around us. Emerging applications include mapping, photogrammetry, surveying, search and rescue, scientific research, and unmanned cargo delivery to name just a few. In this hands-on course all participants will pilot college owned drones to learn how to fly safely and responsibly to generate maps and 3D models utilizing ArcGIS and photogrammetry software. In addition to learning how to pilot the drones, students will explore the legal issues involved including: privacy and safety; FAA and other federal regulations; state and local laws; and current and future policy implications. The course will provide students with a solid basis for pursuing an FAA remote pilot certificate. Not open to students who have completed ENVS 281.
1081 FORG-233-90 Godfather: Art of Hard Choices 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LACS
  The Godfather and The Godfather Part II films are narrative masterpieces that provide many insights into the interplay of character and culture in decision-making in high-stakes situations outside the law. We will interpret the films as illustrations of strategic interaction in stylized mafia settings. We will focus on the psychology of motivations: rationality, interest, emotion, justice, and the mafia’s code of honor (vendetta, omertà, and gender norms). And we will discuss narrative techniques and the relationship between art and life (fiction and reality).
1085 HIST-272-90 Pacific World 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The Pacific Ocean has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes -- migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.
1082 HIST-338-90 Eastern Europe in 20th Century 1.00 SEM Rodriguez, Allison MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  "Eastern Europe" usually conjures up images of grey block buildings and workers toiling under Communism. But this stereotype points to only one moment in the history of a region which has been at times a cosmopolitan empire, a site of new democracies, and the killing grounds of millions of Europeans. This course will explore the various "Eastern Europes" which have existed during the twentieth century, starting with the Austro-Hungarian Empire. With its dissolution after the First World War, we will follow the history of its successor states - Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia - as well as Yugoslavia from the interwar period, through the destruction and horror of World War II, the establishment of the Soviet Bloc and finally the fall of Communism. Along the way we will question and examine what exactly sets Eastern Europe apart from the rest of Europe. How are we to define the region? We will explore issues of nationalism, fascism and socialism in the Eastern European context.
1071 ITAL-102-91 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1076 MATH-121-90 Mathematics of Money 1.00 LEC Wyshinski, Nancy MTWR: 8:00AM-9:40AM N/A NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Exam and completion of QLIT101 with a grade of C- or better.
  An introduction to concepts related to financial mathematics. Topics will include simple interest, compound interest, annuities, investments, retirement plans, credit cards, and mortgages. A strong background in algebra is required. Not open to students who have received credit for Math 131 or higher.
1069 PHIL-250-01 Love, Death, and Twitter 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course will be an exploration of the many ways in which certain technologies -- including cell phones, the internet (and social media), medical technology, and virtual reality -- have changed our experiences and attitudes toward love, death, and education (among other things). By reading the work of a number of philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists, we will gain insight into the impact these technologies have had on our romantic lives, on our understanding of death, and on our ability (or inability) to learn. This course will also entail some virtual-reality experience, as well as some films.
1065 POLS-102-90 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1113 POLS-321-90 Law, Policy, and Society 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-821-90
  This course is about the interaction between law and politics. It treats the federal courts as a political institution that enjoys a complex and changing relationship with its coequal branches of government and the states. We will investigate if course are a powerful policy making branch, how they exercise power, and under what conditions they are most and least powerful. Our focus will be on the federal courts, particularly the US Supreme Court. First, we will consider the broad debates around the power of courts. Second, we will turn to a series of case studies to understand the power of courts in particular instances. Possible case studies include: the NAACP's integration campaign, abortion rights and anti-abortion activism, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title IX, and court policy-making in the era where power is exercised through algorithms.
1066 POLS-355-90 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, CLIC Cross-listing: URST-355-90
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.
1067 URST-355-90 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, CLIC Cross-listing: POLS-355-90
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.