Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - Summer 2021 (ALL: 06/01/2021 - 08/05/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1083 AHIS-271-90 The Arts of the United States 1.00 LEC Curran, Kathleen TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A ART Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The course examines key artistic periods of American painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts from the colonial settlements to the turn of the twentieth century (ca. 1650-1900). We begin with the colonial period and the rise of portraiture and history painting during the American Revolution, witnessing how artists like John Singleton Copley forge an indigenous American style. We then focus on genre as well as landscape painting, where we explore themes of politics, race, and reverence for the land. The class examines the American coming of age at the close of the Civil War and examines the careers of such artists as Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, the American Impressionists, and architects H.H. Richardson and McKim, Mead & White.
1079 AMST-298-90 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway, Nicholas MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
1080 AMST-329-90 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway, Nicholas TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
1038 AMST-453-90 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: AMST-853-90, HIST-353-90
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians. This course fulfills transnational approaches.
1077 ANTH-101-90 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry, Timothy TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB5 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1022 ANTH-227-90 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain, Shafqat MTWR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
1078 ANTH-261-90 Political Violence in SE Asia 1.00 LEC Conroe, Andrew TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A GLB Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Southeast Asia has been both a subject of anthropological fascination and the location of some of the worst mass political violence of the 20th century. In this class, we will explore, discuss, and critique some of the ways in which this violence has been represented and rendered ethnographically. Students will get a general understanding of anthropological approaches to political violence, and—drawing on a variety of case studies from Indonesia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Timor Leste, and elsewhere-- a sense of the particular histories and dynamics of violence in Southeast Asia. Assignments for the class will include regular discussion questions, short response papers, in-class presentations, a midterm essay, and an individual research project.
1009 BIOL-216-01 Human Anatomy 1.00 LEC Dunlap, Kent TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM LSC - 138-9 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C - or better in Biology 140 or Biology 182 or Biology 183, or equivalent college-level introductory biology
  This course will examine the function, development and evolution of the human form. We will examine the anatomy of the musculoskeletal, sensory, nervous, cardiovascular, osmo-regulatory and reproductive systems. Discussions will also include the anatomical basis of certain clinical conditions and pathologies.
1094 BIOL-425-01 Research Biology 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
1035 CHEM-211-20 Elem Organic Chem I Lab 0.25 LAB Cancelled Q1
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  Elementary Organic Chemistry I Lab
1064 CHEM-212-20 Elem Organic Chem II Lab 0.25 LAB Crist, Natalie MTWR: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 301 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  A continuation of the laboratory study begun in Chemistry 211 Lab.
1053 CHEM-317-20 Biological Chemistry Lab 0.25 LAB Curran, Timothy MW: 8:00AM-11:15AM CT - 317 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or permission of instructor.
  A laboratory course that provides instruction on how to investigate the reactions of molecules in biological settings. Emphasis will be on the use of chemical analytical instrumentation to detect and measure biochemical changes.
1023 CHIN-202-01 Intermediate Chinese II 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Chinese 201, with further emphasis on written and spoken development of the current idiom. Three hours of class work. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1084 COLL-113-90 Introduction to Epidemiology 1.00 LEC Cancelled SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles of epidemiology, defined as the study of how disease and injury are distributed in populations, and the factors that influence that distribution. Concepts covered will include measuring morbidity and mortality, study design, association to causation, and ethical and policy considerations. Class time will be divided into lecture and virtual group exercises, using literature, cinema, and public events as prompts for discussion. Students at all levels are welcome.
1140 CPSC-100-90 Essentials of Computing 0.50 LEC Miyazaki, Takunari MTWRF: 8:30AM-4:30PM N/A Y NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will run from June 7-25 and is only open to students in the Tech-Edge program.
  This short course provides an introduction to the most essential aspects of computing and a survey of applications in today's emerging field of digital technology, while exploring their confluence and innovation thinking. Students will learn fundamentals of problem solving and programming using Python. Students will also be introduced to artificial intelligence, blockchain technologies, cybersecurity fundamentals, data analysis and visualization and software engineering. In the final days of the course, students will work together in teams to address and solve real-world challenges. This course assumes no previous programming experience. Only students in the Tech-Edge program are eligible to enroll in this course.
1030 CPSC-316-01 Found Programming Lang 1.00 LEC Cancelled NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 215L and Computer Science 203 (or concurrent enrollment in 203).
  A study of the organization, specification, and behavior of programming languages. The course will focus on five different programming language paradigms: imperative, object-oriented, functional, logic, and concurrent. Programming assignments using example languages from each of these paradigms will be required. Emphasis will be placed on learning C++, PROLOG, and LISP in a Unix environment. Other topics covered include language syntax, control structures, objects, and functions.
1031 CPSC-316-90 Found Programming Lang 1.00 LEC Yoon, Peter MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 215L and Computer Science 203 (or concurrent enrollment in 203).
  A study of the organization, specification, and behavior of programming languages. The course will focus on five different programming language paradigms: imperative, object-oriented, functional, logic, and concurrent. Programming assignments using example languages from each of these paradigms will be required. Emphasis will be placed on learning C++, PROLOG, and LISP in a Unix environment. Other topics covered include language syntax, control structures, objects, and functions.
1154 ECON-299-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1056 ECON-343-90 Intl Trade Policy & Institut 1.00 LEC Dutt, Devika MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  How are the rules of the global trading system decided? What are the key institutions that create the international norms according to which trade is conducted, and how do these institutions operate? This course explores the way conflict and cooperation among governments in the World Trade Organization and in the negotiation of Free Trade Agreements have shaped the trends in trade relationships. Using the backdrop of contemporary problems facing the global economy today, such as dissemination of the Covid-19 vaccine, the increasing digitization of trade, and the possible implementation of a Global Green New Deal, we will examine the way the rules of the game are shaped and their implications. The course will begin with a brief overview of international trade theory.
1057 ECON-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1036 ENGL-260-90 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
1007 ENGL-270-90 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Berry, Ciaran TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A ART Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1086 ENGL-429-90 19th Century Short Fiction 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-829-90
  NOTE: For English majors, satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  This course will mark the development of the American short story as a significant literary form throughout the 19th century. From canonical stalwarts like Washington Irving and Henry James to under-covered writers like Grace King and Alice Dunbar-Nelson, the short story became a space for aesthetic innovation and ideological expression. As both a publishing phenomenon in print culture and a crucial object of contemporary critical discourse, the short story can reveal much about the practices and powers of literary history. Our reading will introduce the methods of literary scholarship, including interpretive analysis; summarizing and contextualizing critical positions; identifying, locating, evaluating and citing scholarly resources; developing research within a critical conversation; composing persuasive arguments; and designing research plans for larger projects.
1047 ENGL-439-90 Evolution of the Western Film 1.00 LEC Younger, James TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: AMST-839-90, ENGL-839-90
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
  The course examines how the Western genre emerged from global popular culture at the end of the 19th century to become one of the most powerful and complex forms for expressing the experience of Modernity. After a careful consideration of the political and philosophical implications of the Western, we will track the development of the genre as it responds to the ideological contradictions and cultural tensions of 20th-century American history, focusing on broad trends within the mainstream, the contributions of individual directors, and the global dissemination of generic elements.
1096 ENVS-282-01 Drone Flight School 1.00 LEC Cancelled Q2
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) or drones have quickly emerged as a new way to explore the world around us. Emerging applications include mapping, photogrammetry, surveying, search and rescue, scientific research, and unmanned cargo delivery to name just a few. In this hands-on course all participants will pilot college owned drones to learn how to fly safely and responsibly to generate maps and 3D models utilizing ArcGIS and photogrammetry software. In addition to learning how to pilot the drones, students will explore the legal issues involved including: privacy and safety; FAA and other federal regulations; state and local laws; and current and future policy implications. The course will provide students with a solid basis for pursuing an FAA remote pilot certificate. Not open to students who have completed ENVS 281.
1074 ENVS-425-01 Research in Env Science Lab 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan on initiating the work no later than the fall of the senior year, and should also plan on no less than two semesters of study with a final formal report to be submitted to the staff. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1081 FORG-233-90 Godfather: Art of Hard Choices 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LACS
  The Godfather and The Godfather Part II films are narrative masterpieces that provide many insights into the interplay of character and culture in decision-making in high-stakes situations outside the law. We will interpret the films as illustrations of strategic interaction in stylized mafia settings. We will focus on the psychology of motivations: rationality, interest, emotion, justice, and the mafia’s code of honor (vendetta, omertà, and gender norms). And we will discuss narrative techniques and the relationship between art and life (fiction and reality).
1112 GHHG-495-01 Community Engagement Project 0.50 IND Paulin, Diana
Frymire, Erin
TBA TBA Y HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course is open only to students in the Global Health Humanities Gateway
  The community engagement project may take many forms, such as collaborating with a health-related non-profit or advocacy group or creating a publicly available resource, such as a digital exhibition. This semester-long component must be health-related and have some connection to a local community as well as to a global context. The project may be connected to a course (such as a Liberal Arts Action Lab course, or other community engaged courses), an internship, or an extracurricular activity in which the student is already enrolled/involved. The project must extend beyond the usual scope and expectations of the course, internship, or activity. It may also be an independent project not related to any other activity. Students are permitted to work in pairs if they so choose. Students will be encouraged to collaborate with Trinity’s Center for Hartford Engagement and Research. All project proposals must be approved by the GHHG director(s). Students in the process of completing their projects will meet regularly with the GHHG director(s) and give a presentation of their work and our end-of-year event.
1085 HIST-272-90 Pacific World 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  The Pacific Ocean has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes -- migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.
1082 HIST-338-90 Eastern Europe in 20th Century 1.00 SEM Rodriguez, Allison MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  "Eastern Europe" usually conjures up images of grey block buildings and workers toiling under Communism. But this stereotype points to only one moment in the history of a region which has been at times a cosmopolitan empire, a site of new democracies, and the killing grounds of millions of Europeans. This course will explore the various "Eastern Europes" which have existed during the twentieth century, starting with the Austro-Hungarian Empire. With its dissolution after the First World War, we will follow the history of its successor states - Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia - as well as Yugoslavia from the interwar period, through the destruction and horror of World War II, the establishment of the Soviet Bloc and finally the fall of Communism. Along the way we will question and examine what exactly sets Eastern Europe apart from the rest of Europe. How are we to define the region? We will explore issues of nationalism, fascism and socialism in the Eastern European context.
1097 HIST-353-90 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: AMST-853-90, AMST-453-90
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians. This course fulfills transnational approaches.
1041 ITAL-102-90 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC Rinaldi, Ivana MTWR: 10:00AM-11:45AM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1071 ITAL-102-91 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1033 LACS-299-90 Language, Culture & Meaning 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course (taught in English) starts from the dual premise that culture is largely a product of communication and that, in turn, communication is a basis and record of culture. Therefore, some of the questions central to this course will be: What is language? How do the many texts around us mediate our understanding of culture? And what happens when ideas and concepts are translated from one language and one cultural context to another? Students will be able to explore these and other questions within the context of their own experience of language and communication. Given the cross-cultural nature of this course, there will be regular guest lectures by faculty from a range of other fields.
1042 MATH-107-90 Elements of Statistics 1.00 LEC Babapoor, Youlanda MTWR: 12:00PM-1:40PM N/A NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  A course designed primarily for students in the social and natural sciences. Topics include graphical methods, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course is not open to students with credit for Mathematics 131 or above, or who have placed into Mathematics 207 on the Mathematic Placement Examination
1076 MATH-121-90 Mathematics of Money 1.00 LEC Wyshinski, Nancy MTWR: 8:00AM-9:40AM N/A NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Exam and completion of QLIT101 with a grade of C- or better.
  An introduction to concepts related to financial mathematics. Topics will include simple interest, compound interest, annuities, investments, retirement plans, credit cards, and mortgages. A strong background in algebra is required. Not open to students who have received credit for Math 131 or higher.
1124 MATH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1182 MUSC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y ART Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1037 NESC-120-01 Nervous Connections 1.00 LEC Swart, Chris MW: 2:00PM-5:15PM MC - AUD NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: NESC-120-90
  Recent scientific research indicates that a worm has 302 neurons, snails have long-term memory, and elephants can hear through their feet. This course will draw on current research in neuroscience to explain why information about other animals is relevant to our lives. Selected readings, lectures and class discussions will provide a basic understanding of the human nervous system and how research on animal systems has yielded this knowledge. Laboratory exercises will introduce the students to nervous system anatomy and function through dissection and experimental techniques. A basic understanding of biology and chemistry will be helpful, but this course has no pre-requisites. First-year students are given preference.
1046 NESC-120-90 Nervous Connections 1.00 LEC Swart, Chris MW: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: NESC-120-01
  Recent scientific research indicates that a worm has 302 neurons, snails have long-term memory, and elephants can hear through their feet. This course will draw on current research in neuroscience to explain why information about other animals is relevant to our lives. Selected readings, lectures and class discussions will provide a basic understanding of the human nervous system and how research on animal systems has yielded this knowledge. Laboratory exercises will introduce the students to nervous system anatomy and function through dissection and experimental techniques. A basic understanding of biology and chemistry will be helpful, but this course has no pre-requisites. First-year students are given preference.
1092 NESC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1052 PBPL-123-90 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Wasielewski, Mark MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
1069 PHIL-250-01 Love, Death, and Twitter 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course will be an exploration of the many ways in which certain technologies -- including cell phones, the internet (and social media), medical technology, and virtual reality -- have changed our experiences and attitudes toward love, death, and education (among other things). By reading the work of a number of philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists, we will gain insight into the impact these technologies have had on our romantic lives, on our understanding of death, and on our ability (or inability) to learn. This course will also entail some virtual-reality experience, as well as some films.
1050 PHYS-101-01 Prin Physics I 1.25 LEC Branning, David MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM MC - 225 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  An introduction to the fundamental ideas of physics. Beginning with kinematics—the quantitative description of motion—the course covers the Newtonian mechanics of point masses, Newton’s theory of universal gravitation, the work-energy principle, and the conservation of energy and momentum. A student taking Physics 101 cannot earn credit Physics 141.
1051 PHYS-101-20 Prin Physics I 1.25 LAB Palandage, Kalum TR: 2:00PM-5:15PM MC - 217 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  An introduction to the fundamental ideas of physics. Beginning with kinematics—the quantitative description of motion—the course covers the Newtonian mechanics of point masses, Newton’s theory of universal gravitation, the work-energy principle, and the conservation of energy and momentum. A student taking Physics 101 cannot earn credit Physics 141.
1065 POLS-102-90 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1003 POLS-222-90 Social Inequal United States 1.00 LEC Dudas, Mary TR: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: Seat reservations: 10 seats for first years; 11 seats sophomores; 3 seats for juniors who are POLS majors. Seniors are not permitted to take this course without instructor permission.
  This course considers the implications of social inequalities for American politics. Income and wealth disparities in the United States have grown rapidly since the 1970s, overlapping with social exclusions based on race, gender, and sexual orientation. The course explores the causes, consequences, and solutions to rising economic inequality at the national and local levels, examining particular instances from Connecticut and contextualizing them within a broader global context. We will pay particular attention to the role of public policies in creating or potentially mitigating inequalities among citizens. Throughout the course we will consider the implications of social inequality for American politics and discuss how the persistence of different forms of inequality squares with enduring ideals of equality and equal opportunity in the American political system.
1019 POLS-304-90 Education and Immigration 1.00 SEM Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-817-90
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  NOTE: This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar.
  This course is designed to introduce students to urban educational policy, with particular focus on the major issues and challenges facing urban and suburban policymakers. After a brief overview of the shape and history of the American school system, we will move toward considering a variety of different perspectives on why it has proven so difficult to improve America's schools. We will examine standards-based, market-driven, professionally-led and networked models of reform, looking at their theories of change, implementation challenges, and the critiques leveled against these approaches. We will examine a variety of recent reform efforts at both the federal and state levels. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which immigration and educational policy interact.
1113 POLS-321-90 Law, Policy, and Society 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-821-90
  This course is about the interaction between law and politics. It treats the federal courts as a political institution that enjoys a complex and changing relationship with its coequal branches of government and the states. We will investigate if course are a powerful policy making branch, how they exercise power, and under what conditions they are most and least powerful. Our focus will be on the federal courts, particularly the US Supreme Court. First, we will consider the broad debates around the power of courts. Second, we will turn to a series of case studies to understand the power of courts in particular instances. Possible case studies include: the NAACP's integration campaign, abortion rights and anti-abortion activism, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title IX, and court policy-making in the era where power is exercised through algorithms.
1032 POLS-353-90 Authoritarianism 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo TR: 10:00AM-1:15PM N/A GLB5 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  More than half of the countries in the world are authoritarian or mixed regimes. Yet the study of authoritarianism—specifically, how authoritarian regimes function, and sources of their resilience and collapse—has long been neglected in political science. Authoritarian regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Syria, all widely regarded as models of resilience right up until their demise, turned out to be strikingly and unexpectedly fragile. Conversely, analysts have predicted the collapse of North Korea for decades, only to witness its survival through war, famine, economic collapse, and potentially destabilizing leadership transitions. In this course, we will examine the nascent scholarship on authoritarianism, especially as it pertains to Eurasia—namely, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and East and Southeast Asia.
1066 POLS-355-90 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, CLIC Cross-listing: URST-355-90
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.
1089 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1045 PSYC-225-01 Memory in Everyday Life 1.00 LEC Holland, Alisha MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM MC - AUD SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course explores how we use memory in our everyday lives. We will analyze what memory is and the methods that psychologists use to study it. We will discuss how we can apply the information that psychological research has uncovered about memory to improve our lives, including in how we learn and study information. Finally, we will examine how memory for our personal experiences affects our self-identity, our relationships with others, and our ability to plan for the future. Course content will draw from textbook and empirical journal article readings, as well as popular media, films, and podcasts.
1034 QLIT-101-90 Foundat Tech Quantitat Reason 1.00 LEC Babapoor, Youlanda MTWR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course offers students new insights into important and widely used mathematical concepts, with a strong focus on numerical and algebraic relationships.
1070 RHET-125-90 Writing for a Digital World 1.00 SEM Marino, Nicholas MTWR: 4:00PM-5:40PM N/A WEA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  As reading and writing shift from pages to screens, images and other visual elements are becoming increasingly important to successful writing. This course is designed to help students think critically about the role of the visual in written communication today. Using digital design tools in combination with academic writing skills such as research and drafting, students will develop strategies and skills for blending images and words effectively in a range of genres and contexts - both digital and printed, academic and professional.
1118 RHET-395-01 Academic Internship 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Internship or field work placement, with a required academic component to be determined by the faculty sponsor and student. Students need to submit a completed internship contract form to Career Services. Students will not be enrolled until the contract has been approved.
1039 ROME-247-90 Italy’s Holocaust 1.00 SEM Martin, Simon MTWR: 9:00AM-10:40AM N/A GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  This course will take a detailed look at the Holocaust principally from an Italian perspective. Through a combination of class lectures and discussions, film screenings and readings, students will be able to connect decisions taken in Fascist Italy with the end result of forced labour and mechanised killing. In doing so they will gain knowledge of pre-Fascist and Fascist Italy’s relationship with its Jewish population, the repressive nature of the dictatorship, its involvement in the Second World War and its alliance with Nazi Germany to gain a thorough grounding in how scholars have sought to explain Italy’s Holocaust. Having established the processes and practicalities by which Jews in Italy were rounded-up and deported from occupied Italy, students will reflect upon debates surrounding guilt and how this has been used to excuse or deflect responsibility for the deportation and murder of religious and political prisoners. Instruction will consist of a series of online lectures and class debates around assigned readings, film and literature. Throughout the duration of course we shall be reading and discussing Primo Levi’s account of his experience of surviving Auschwitz in If this is a Man. Providing a solid grounding in Italy’s role in the Holocaust, the course will also introduce students to how memory of this particular event has been/is constructed, used and abused for political means.
1040 ROME-276-90 History Wars 1.00 SEM Cancelled Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  This course will take the construction of memory and identity in Rome as a means of analysing the country and nation’s post-Unification development. Through a combination of online class lectures and discussions based upon readings and visual images of key places of memory and identity construction in Rome, students will gain a knowledge of the capital’s key role in the creation of modern Italy, in addition to an in-depth understanding of the difficulties encountered in state and identity formation up until the present day. Providing a solid grounding in Italian history it will also introduce students to memory studies and the importance of not just history but the manner and nature of its construction, especially through monuments, to contemporary society and politics.
1028 SOCL-213-90 Sociology of #MeToo 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta MTWR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course examines sexual assault and harassment through data, theory and praxis. First, students examine empirical evidence regarding the scope of sexual assault (including on college campuses), and how to address claims which challenge the prevalence of sexual violation. In particular, how social scientists measure sexual violence and sexual consent will be illustrated. Second, this course addresses micro- and macro-level 'powerscapes' surrounding sexualized interactions. For example, the interactional study of deference and demeanor between social unequals helped crystallize the term, sexual harassment. Additionally, an intersectional perspective tells us how sexual violation is shaped by interlocking systems of oppressions. Finally, linking theory with praxis, students explore prevention strategies like bystander intervention programs. Classes will include historical and contemporary legal cases discussion, and documentary films.
1029 SOCL-312-01 Social Class & Mobility 1.00 LEC Valocchi, Stephen MW: 10:00AM-1:15PM SH - N128 SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course is an introduction to the theory and research on stratification and mobility in modern societies. Every society distributes resources unequally. This distribution affects not only economic outcomes such as wages, profits, and material well being, but also social and political outcomes such as protest, voting behavior, and self-esteem. This course will explore why this occurs, the types of inequalities that exist, and the consequences of inequality for the distribution of power and for democratic processes in American society. Specific topics include class, occupational, race and gender inequalities, and the social, psychological, and cultural consequences of inequality.
1024 THDN-270-01 Arts in Action: Community 1.00 SEM Cancelled ART Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  In this course we will examine the way the arts in general and movement in particular both engage a community and are engaged in the community. Using Hartford and the region as a field for our inquiry, we will look at the role the arts play in contributing to the overall health of a community with a particular focus on schools for at-risk youth, correctional institutions, homes for the elderly, specialized magnet schools, after-school programming and performance that utilizes the community as a generative resource. In addition to readings, films, guest speakers and discussions, there will be applied observation and study in the city of Hartford and beyond.
1067 URST-355-90 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:15PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, CLIC Cross-listing: POLS-355-90
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.