Course Schedule

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2374 AMST-817-01 U.S.-Mexico Border 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-417-01
  This course explores the social and political history of the U.S.-Mexico border divide, from the evolution of border policing, justifications for sealing the border, and the borderlands' material particularities in contrast to the imagined border. It discusses the expanding "borderization" of the United States. How has border security policy become an extension of U.S. sovereignty, and what is the role of such sovereignty in a globalizing world? Finally, we will talk about what it means to clandestinely cross the border, the construction of race connected to the experience of border crossing, and how the border becomes embodied in those who traverse it. We will read primary policy documents and academic and literary sources that tell multi-dimensional stories of the border as place, idea, and experience. This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
1422 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller, Karen R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history. This course fulfills the public humanities approach. This course meets the Public Humanities method requirement.
2487 AMST-859-01 Orphans and Others in Am Lit 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-459-01, ENGL-859-01
  From cross-dressing sailors and adventurers to castaways and runaways, early American literature is filled with narratives of reinvention—sometimes by choice, often by necessity. In this course we will look at the peril and promise of such reinvention as various figures reimagine their relation to a social order organized by family lineage and paternal descent. For some the Americas (at least theoretically) presented a world of new possibilities while for others this was a dangerous and isolating place. Our readings will include novels, autobiographical narratives, confessions, and other literary accounts. This seminar is research-intensive.
2523 AMST-879-01 Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-479-01, ENGL-879-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the intense arguments made in the aftermath of independence, and the passionate creative works produced in the wake of revolution. We will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the constitution of American identities in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
1298 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1299 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1164 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1165 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1167 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1274 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).