Course Schedule

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2022 (ALL: 01/27/2022 - 05/16/2022)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3021 AMST-806-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-406-01
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2844 AMST-825-01 Curating Conversations 1.00 SEM Camp, Jordan W: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  Scholars in the public humanities are able to facilitate conversations across multiple divides: between disciplines, over different institutional spaces, and in traditional and non-traditional sites of knowledge production. This seminar trains students how to curate such conversations. Through readings and discussion, students will learn a variety of critical theories and methodological approaches to develop their own public humanities projects. Along with key texts, students will learn to engage different forms of evidence such as expressive culture, social movement periodicals, oral histories, museum exhibitions, podcasts, and digital archives By the end of the semester, students will demonstrate a critical understanding of public humanities theories and practices; develop research, writing, and curating skills; and present a project to a panel of researchers, educators, and activists.
2847 AMST-850-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-350-01, AMST-450-01
  This course is open only to History and American Studies majors, or permission of instructor.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed Black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers this process, including civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2124 AMST-879-01 Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-479-01, ENGL-879-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the intense arguments made in the aftermath of independence, and the passionate creative works produced in the wake of revolution. We will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the constitution of American identities in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
1275 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2201 AMST-896-01 US Empire Asia/PacificWars 1.00 SEM Nebolon, Juliet W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-496-01
  U.S. military involvement in Asia and the Pacific Islands has impacted the experiences of Asian and Pacific Islander communities and their diaspora since the late nineteenth century. In this seminar, students study the history of the Asia/Pacific wars and investigate the consequences of U.S. militarism, empire, and settler colonialism in Asia and the Pacific Islands via individual research projects. Together we will examine historical narratives, government documents, and cultural texts (films, literature, musicals) to understand how U.S. wars in the Asia/Pacific region have informed notions of race, indigeneity, gender, and empire both at home and abroad. The course brings together scholarship from the fields of American Studies, Asian American Studies, Pacific Indigenous Studies, and East Asian Studies.
1276 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1146 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1147 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1149 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1255 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).