Course Schedule

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Course Listing for EDUCATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2021 (ALL: 09/07/2021 - 12/21/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3310 EDUC-200-01 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Castillo, Elise TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first year students.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
1871 EDUC-200-20 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: Each student must reserve a 3-hour block of time in their weekly schedule (anytime between 9am-3pm weekdays) for a community learning placement in a neighborhood Hartford public school, to be arranged by the instructor during the first week of the course.
  NOTE: This is the placement section for the EDUC 200 lecture.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3421 EDUC-206-01 Data Visualization for All 1.00 SEM Dougherty, Jack TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, PBPL, RHET, URST
  How can charts and maps tell meaningful stories? How can they mislead us from the truth? In this introductory hands-on course, we will create data visualizations in order to better understand design principles and develop a critical analysis of the field. Students will learn skills in both quantitative reasoning and digital storytelling as we advance from beginner tools to editing code templates. For the community learning component, our class will build interactive charts and maps on a public policy issue with a Hartford-area partner organization. No coding experience is necessary, but curiosity is required.
2430 EDUC-303-01 Sociology of Education 1.00 SEM Douglas, Daniel MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: SOCL-303-01
  PR: EDUC200 or SOCL101
  This course will examine and apply a sociological perspective to education and schooling. It will examine the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that culture and social structures affect educational institutions. It begins by surveying texts which look at education and schooling from different viewpoints within sociological theory (including but not limited to: functionalism, rationalization, conflict theory, cultural studies, feminism, and intersectionality).The course then examines contemporary issues affecting US and international educational systems, considers proposed reforms, and discussed alternatives to schooling. In addition to weekly written assignments, students will complete a secondary data analysis project related to an educational topic of their choice.
3312 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Castillo, Elise TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, PBPL, WMGS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
3313 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, INTS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
1564 EDUC-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3314 EDUC-400-01 Senior Research Seminar 1.00 SEM Douglas, Daniel M: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This seminar is open to senior Educational Studies majors only.
  To fulfill the senior exercise requirement, students carry out an independent research project that builds upon acquired skills and evolving interests. The weekly seminar provides a thematic focus as well as a continuous forum for both support and critical feedback from peers, in preparation for a public presentation of the student’s work at the end of the semester. Each year, the seminar will be organized around a broad theme in educational studies.
1565 EDUC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3151 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
3152 AMST-405-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-805-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3153 AMST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-405-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3242 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
3513 CLCV-103-01 Classical Civilization in Comm 1.00 SEM Dugan, Kelly TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in any CLCV, LATN, GREK, course or EDUC 200, or permission of the instructor.
  Share your love of the ancient Mediterranean world by learning how to create fun and engaging educational programs for middle-school students! In the classroom at Trinity, students will learn about educational theories and methodologies with an emphasis on antiracist approaches to studying classical antiquity. For the community learning component, students will co-design and help implement a Classical Studies curriculum that is integrated into the 6th grade program at HMTCA, a middle school across the street from Trinity.
3204 ECON-318-01 Basic Econometrics 1.00 LEC Li, Wensu MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. The computer will be used but no experience is necessary.
2410 LAAL-200-01 Action Research Methods Htfd 1.00 LEC Cummins, Emily M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC, HRST, PBPL, URST
  NOTE: Pending pandemic conditions, this course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza.
  What is the role of academic research in social change? How can students and community groups collaborate effectively to co-create, implement, and use research projects to solve social problems? In this course, students will study the theories and methods of interdisciplinary action research. Emphasizing ethical collaboration, students will learn research design strategies, methods, tools, and research tools in order to work with community partners to solve pressing problems. Students will learn to use a variety of statistical, geographic, and interview data to answer questions, make recommendations, and tell stories about the issues that are most relevant to Hartford.
1980 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201, Juniors and Seniors must be PBPL majors, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for PBPL majors
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
2098 PBPL-245-01 Title IX: Changing Campus Cult 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for PBPL majors.
  This course will explore the legal and policy implications of the new Title IX federal guidelines as they apply to equity in athletics and sexual misconduct on college campuses. During the course of the term we will consider how best to devise and implement effective policies aimed at: increasing equity in college athletics; reducing incidents of sexual misconduct on college campuses; protecting the legal rights of all parties to administrative hearings; ensuring that institutions of higher education are in full compliance with new federal and state mandates. Trinity’s Title IX Coordinator, will periodically join in our class discussions.
3256 PHIL-374-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd, Dan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  NOTE: 7 seats reserved for juniors, 3 for sophomores.
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
3257 PHIL-374-02 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd, Dan MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  NOTE: 7 seats reserved for juniors, 3 for sophomores.
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
1427 PSYC-221-01 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Casserly, Elizabeth MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 32 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for PSYC majors.
  NOTE: First year students may not enroll in this course.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1428 PSYC-221-80 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie M: 1:15PM-3:55PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for PSYC majors
  NOTE: First year students may not enroll in this course,
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1429 PSYC-221-81 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie T: 1:30PM-4:10PM N/A NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for PSYC majors
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
3260 PSYC-236-01 Adolescent Psychology 1.00 LEC Jones-Gordils, Hannah WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  This course will focus on the important theoretical and conceptual issues in adolescent psychology and their experimental support. A developmental perspective will be adopted in order to emphasize that adolescence is not an isolated period but rather part of the process of development that occurs throughout life.
1420 PSYC-295-01 Child Development 1.00 LEC Anselmi, Dina MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  A survey of the biological, cognitive, and social factors that influence the process of development. The course will focus on both theoretical and empirical issues in child development and will include topics such as attachment, emotion regulation, language, cognition, and socialization. The course will highlight how cultural factors, along with biology interact to influence both the process and the outcomes of development. This course includes a community learning component, where students will choose a problem of interest and after talking with community experts, propose a solution to that problem.
1417 PSYC-295-20 Child Development-Lab 0.25 LAB Anselmi, Dina M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 295, or concurrent enrollment.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for PSYC majors.
  An introduction to the major scientific methods of observation, interviews, and experimentation that are used to study developmental questions in the areas of language, memory and concept development, sex-role stereotyping, prosocial development and play. Students will study infant and preschool children at the child care center located on campus. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 295.
3262 PSYC-384-01 Cultural Psychology 1.00 SEM Outten, Robert WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226.
  NOTE: All seats reserved for PSYC majors.
  Cultural psychology focuses on how sociocultural contexts and cultural practices affect and reflect the human psyche. Our understanding of cultural influences on psychological processes related to topics like the self, emotion, relationships, perception, multicultural issues, and health, will be informed by theoretical and empirical research. We will explore various cultural contexts, including Latino, Asian, African, European, and North American cultures. We will examine major issues in cultural psychology, including the methodological challenges that researchers face when trying to bring a cultural level of analysis to psychological processes.
2433 SOCL-214-01 Racism 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, GLBLSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  A cross-national comparison of racial and ethnic differences as sources of conflict and inequality within and between societies. We will also consider the role of race and ethnicity as a basis for group and national solidarity. Topics will include the persistence of ethnic and racial loyalties in regard to language, marital choice, and politics; a comparison of social mobility patterns among various ethnic and racial groups; ethnicity and race as reactionary or revolutionary ideologies; and the issues and facts regarding assimilation and pluralism in different societies.
3413 SOCL-312-01 Social Class & Mobility 1.00 LEC Valocchi, Stephen TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course is an introduction to the theory and research on stratification and mobility in modern societies. Every society distributes resources unequally. This distribution affects not only economic outcomes such as wages, profits, and material well being, but also social and political outcomes such as protest, voting behavior, and self-esteem. This course will explore why this occurs, the types of inequalities that exist, and the consequences of inequality for the distribution of power and for democratic processes in American society. Specific topics include class, occupational, race and gender inequalities, and the social, psychological, and cultural consequences of inequality.
3417 THDN-272-01 Arts in Education 1.25 SEM Pappas, Rebecca W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  This community learning course will expose students across disciplines to the ways arts are taught in classroom and studio environments. Using the Greater Hartford Academy for the Arts as our laboratory environment students will be exposed to how arts both enrich traditional instruction, and can promote empowerment and equity for a wide variety of pupils.
3518 URST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: AMST-805-01, AMST-405-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.