Course Schedule

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Browse the course schedule by:
Select a department/program:
Select a level:
Select a term:
Courses available to first-year students only!
Select a session:

Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2022 (ALL: 01/27/2022 - 05/16/2022)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2939 AMST-202-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-201-01
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for AMST majors.
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
2120 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first year students.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2919 AMST-210-01 Doing Culture 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Culture is not something we simply consume, inhabit or even create. Culture is serious business: pun both intended and upended. We have a dynamic relationship with the world around us and in this class we will use culture, both elite and popular, to help bridge the gap between what we do here in the “ivory tower” and how we live out there in the “real world,” hopefully changing both in the process. Here we will not take culture for granted but engage culture as a method, a tool by which to engage, analyze and critique both historical narratives and contemporary events. In this course, street life, advertisements, popular media, and clothing are interrogated as archives of dynamic meaning, arenas of social interaction, acts of personal pleasure, and sites of struggle. We will also explore what happens when a diversity of forces converge at the intersection of commerce and culture. Present day notions of popular culture, and topics such as authenticity and selling out, will be interrogated both socially and historically.
3209 AMST-220-03 Possible Earths 1.00 SEM Wickman, Thomas MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-220-03
  NOTE: 2 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, and 2 for juniors.
  This seminar examines environmental thinking across histories and cultures in order to retrieve sources of hope and wisdom for a planetary future. Reading and discussion will foreground current humanity's vast inheritance when it comes to ways of existing in community with and knowing a living planet. Students will look critically at how texts, images, objects, and practices are historical evidence of the many ways humans have imagined natural communities and acted within them.
2921 AMST-254-01 Invisible Man & Black Mod Expr 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL Cross-listing: URST-254-01
  This class interrogates the text and contexts of Ralph Ellison’s iconic novel Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course surveys key themes in the Black modern experience from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism, and black nationalism. Ultimately, Ellison crafted a text of profound social commentary through experimentation with archival evidence and literary form. This class reconstructs the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of an American classic.
1364 AMST-301-01 AmStud Seminar 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott W: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This course, required for American Studies majors and ordinarily taken in the sophomore or junior year, examines central methods in the field. Situated on a theme, such as race or popular culture, seminar participants engage in archival, spatial, public humanities, and transnational approaches to the American experience.
3114 AMST-315-01 Abolition: A Global History 1.00 LEC Heatherton, Christina TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HRST-315-01
  Over the past decade, a new word has emerged in the lexicon of struggle: abolition. Alongside calls to "Abolish prisons," "Abolish ICE," and "Abolish borders," organizers have challenged the horizons of political possibility. This class considers contemporary debates while situating them in a long global history. We will study how definitions of freedom, the state, and human rights have been shaped by struggles to abolish slavery in tandem with Indigenous struggles against settler colonialism. We will learn how abolition has long been defined not simply as the negation of untenable violence but as an affirmation of alternative ways of being. By engaging American Studies and Human Rights scholarship on incarceration, disability, racism, gender and sexuality, we will deepen our understanding of this language of struggle.
3165 AMST-319-01 Understandings of Puerto Rico 1.00 LEC Guzman, Amanda MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: ANTH-319-01
  An island uniquely characterized by a liminal political status and a dominant stateside diaspora, the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico has been the subject of renewed national attention in the wake of the devastating 2017 Hurricane María and the 2019 "Verano Boricua" which saw the ousting of the governor, Ricardo Rosselló. This course interrogates Puerto Rican culture on its own terms - shifting from traditional definitions of identity formation to contemporary critiques centering historically marginalized communities amidst ongoing climate and economic precarity. Students will work hands-on analyzing diverse (im)material cultural productions, originating from the island and stateside diasporas. Students will engage with Puerto Rican cultural workers as they develop new, critical understandings of the island's cultural legacy and its future.
3116 AMST-323-01 Grounded Ways of Knowing 1.00 LEC Heatherton, Christina T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HRST-323-01
  Renowned popular educator Paulo Freire once warned of teaching with false impartiality, treating societies under study as if one was not also a "participant in it." He sought to challenge the divides separating spaces of learning from the process of learning itself. In this seminar, we will consider the questions Freire sought to ask and answer. By engaging texts in American Studies and Human Rights we will interrogate the spatial, epistemological, and social divides between the places in which we learn and the spaces we inhabit to do so. Through readings and discussion, we will consider how we might observe, engage, and challenge those divides. Students will produce a final project that interrogates these divisions as well as the many ways they might be transgressed.
3138 AMST-327-01 Racial Capitalism 1.00 LEC Camp, Jordan MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: SOCL-327-01
  This course introduces students to critical theories of racial and class formation. Students will trace how modern racial and labor regimes came into being and how, in turn, they have impacted contemporary debates about capitalism, white nationalism, and populism. Through readings by key theorists in American Studies, students will interrogate new and evolving theories of racial capitalism. Course discussions will explore how critiques of racial capitalism have emerged out of Black freedom, anticolonial, labor, feminist, queer of color, and immigrant struggles. Throughout the course, we will screen films and engage primary sources that inform these debates. By the end of the course, students will be able to define and describe the relationships between racism, capitalism, accumulation, dispossession, and the state's regulation of gender and sexuality.
2993 AMST-329-01 Civil War Literature 1.00 SEM Hager, Christopher MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-329-01
  In this course, we will learn about the literary culture of the Civil War era (by reading Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman, among others) and also consider broader questions about how we read, value, and remember literary works. What makes a text "Civil War literature"? Must it have been written during the U.S. Civil War, or about events of that war, or by a person who participated in the war? And do we understand literature differently when we organize it around a historical event rather than forms, genres, or authors? We will engage with the most recent scholarship on the subject and converse (in person or via Skype) with some of the nation's leading experts on Civil War literature.
2856 AMST-336-01 U.S. Colonialism 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: INTS-335-01
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for AMST majors.
  What does it mean to study the United States in the world, and the world in the United States? This course considers the role of the United States within global relations of empire, capitalism, migration, and war. It also examines how U.S. domestic politics of race, gender, national identity, and social justice have evolved in relation to these transnational histories. We will explore how the existence of the U.S. nation-state is premised upon the global histories of European colonialism, indigenous displacement, and transatlantic slavery. We will analyze the cultures and consequences of U.S. empire, as well as the multiracial and transnational social movements that have contested U.S expansion. This interdisciplinary course combines historical, literary, visual, and theoretical texts.
3001 AMST-340-01 American Adaptations 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-340-01
  This course will look at the ways American writers from the nineteenth century to the present have mythologized an early American moment, looking to the past to critique or celebrate American identity through fiction and poetry. We will focus on texts concerned with early America, from works like Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter to twentieth-century texts like I, Tituba by Maryse Conde and A Mercy by Toni Morrison. By focusing on the historical and literary context for such works, including pivotal moments like the Salem witch trials, King Philip's War, and the American Revolution and writers like Mary Rowlandson and Phillis Wheatley, we will frame our discussion of the ways the past usefully informs current conversations around race, identity, and belonging.
3289 AMST-352-01 Black Power/Red Power 1.00 SEM McNeil, Mary R: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-352-01
  Heeding recent scholars' calls to place Black Studies and Native American and Indigenous Studies in more active dialogue with each other, this seminar examines the Black Power and Red Power movements. Students will engage both primary and secondary sources, and attend to the ways in which these movements rejected the possibility of Black and Indigenous incorporation into the American polity and instead called for self-determination and political autonomy. Instead of limiting our consideration of Black Power and Red Power to the late 1960s and 1970s, we will take a "long movement" approach to thinking about these movements. Topics covered will include: sovereignty and self-determination, land and community control, revolutionary violence and self-defense, gender and sexuality; and solidarity.
3171 AMST-356-01 Black Disability Studies 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  This 300-level AMST seminar explores how past and present representations and perceptions of disability and blackness overlap. In response to racism and discriminatory practices, Black Americans often seek distance from the added stigma of disability (the disabled, like other marginalized communities, have often been deemed unfit for citizenship, and threatening to the stability and health of mainstream U.S. society); this strategy reinforces the power of ableism and erases the value of diverse bodies and lived experiences. By examining how Black-disabled intersectionality informs a variety of representational sites, such as fiction, poetry, film, and performance, we will work toward a fuller understanding of the shared humanity and overlapping histories that bind us as citizens of the nation and of the world.
1168 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3022 AMST-406-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-397-01, AMST-806-01
  NOTE: 6 seats for HIST 397, 6 seats for AMST406, and 3 seats for AMST 806.
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2819 AMST-425-01 Curating Conversations 1.00 SEM Camp, Jordan W: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-825-01
  Scholars in the public humanities are able to facilitate conversations across multiple divides: between disciplines, over different institutional spaces, and in traditional and non-traditional sites of knowledge production. This seminar trains students how to curate such conversations. Through readings and discussion, students will learn a variety of critical theories and methodological approaches to develop their own public humanities projects. Along with key texts, students will learn to engage different forms of evidence such as expressive culture, social movement periodicals, oral histories, museum exhibitions, podcasts, and digital archives By the end of the semester, students will demonstrate a critical understanding of public humanities theories and practices; develop research, writing, and curating skills; and present a project to a panel of researchers, educators, and activists.
2845 AMST-450-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-850-01, HIST-350-01
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed Black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers this process, including civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
1169 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2127 AMST-479-01 Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-879-01, ENGL-879-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  NOTE: Students who have taken English 377 for credit cannot take the new Revolutionary Generations course for credit
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the intense arguments made in the aftermath of independence, and the passionate creative works produced in the wake of revolution. We will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the constitution of American identities in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
1170 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
2200 AMST-496-01 US Empire Asia/PacificWars 1.00 SEM Nebolon, Juliet W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: HIST-345-01, AMST-896-01
  U.S. military involvement in Asia and the Pacific Islands has impacted the experiences of Asian and Pacific Islander communities and their diaspora since the late nineteenth century. In this seminar, students study the history of the Asia/Pacific wars and investigate the consequences of U.S. militarism, empire, and settler colonialism in Asia and the Pacific Islands via individual research projects. Together we will examine historical narratives, government documents, and cultural texts (films, literature, musicals) to understand how U.S. wars in the Asia/Pacific region have informed notions of race, indigeneity, gender, and empire both at home and abroad. The course brings together scholarship from the fields of American Studies, Asian American Studies, Pacific Indigenous Studies, and East Asian Studies.
1131 AMST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
3021 AMST-806-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-397-01, AMST-406-01
  NOTE: 6 seats for HIST 397, 6 seats for AMST406, and 3 seats for AMST 806.
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2844 AMST-825-01 Curating Conversations 1.00 SEM Camp, Jordan W: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  Scholars in the public humanities are able to facilitate conversations across multiple divides: between disciplines, over different institutional spaces, and in traditional and non-traditional sites of knowledge production. This seminar trains students how to curate such conversations. Through readings and discussion, students will learn a variety of critical theories and methodological approaches to develop their own public humanities projects. Along with key texts, students will learn to engage different forms of evidence such as expressive culture, social movement periodicals, oral histories, museum exhibitions, podcasts, and digital archives By the end of the semester, students will demonstrate a critical understanding of public humanities theories and practices; develop research, writing, and curating skills; and present a project to a panel of researchers, educators, and activists.
2847 AMST-850-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-350-01, AMST-450-01
  This course is open only to History and American Studies majors, or permission of instructor.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed Black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers this process, including civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2124 AMST-879-01 Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-479-01, ENGL-879-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the intense arguments made in the aftermath of independence, and the passionate creative works produced in the wake of revolution. We will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the constitution of American identities in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
1275 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2201 AMST-896-01 US Empire Asia/PacificWars 1.00 SEM Nebolon, Juliet W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-345-01, AMST-496-01
  U.S. military involvement in Asia and the Pacific Islands has impacted the experiences of Asian and Pacific Islander communities and their diaspora since the late nineteenth century. In this seminar, students study the history of the Asia/Pacific wars and investigate the consequences of U.S. militarism, empire, and settler colonialism in Asia and the Pacific Islands via individual research projects. Together we will examine historical narratives, government documents, and cultural texts (films, literature, musicals) to understand how U.S. wars in the Asia/Pacific region have informed notions of race, indigeneity, gender, and empire both at home and abroad. The course brings together scholarship from the fields of American Studies, Asian American Studies, Pacific Indigenous Studies, and East Asian Studies.
1276 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1146 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1147 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1149 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1255 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).