Course Schedule

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Fall 2021 (ALL: 09/08/2021 - 12/22/2021)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1375 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 4 seats reserved for sophomores, 15 for first year students.
  NOTE: AMST majors: if you are a rising junior or senior and have not yet taken AMST 203, please contact the professor to be enrolled in this course.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
3272 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: 4 seats reserved for sophomores, 15 for first year students.
  NOTE: AMST majors: if you are a rising junior or senior and have not yet taken AMST 203, please contact the professor to be enrolled in this course.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2800 AMST-209-01 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-209-01
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3441 AMST-223-01 The Prison & Public Humanities 1.00 LEC Camp, Jordan MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  The United States has the world's largest prison population. This course interrogates the structures and processes that have led to this calamitous condition. It introduces students to public humanities approaches to understanding the problem of mass incarceration. It prepares students for engaged public intellectual work in oral history, journalism, and social justice advocacy, among other creative applications. Through readings, lectures, and original research, students will acquire an inventory of concepts, including: systemic racism, the carceral state, policing, and security. Throughout the course, we will ask: How have carceral resolutions of social and economic crisis been legitimated? How have public humanities scholars challenged dominant definitions of mass incarceration? Together, we will explore the dimensions of the problem and what ethical and political alternatives might be possible.
3329 AMST-314-01 Global Radicalism 1.00 SEM Heatherton, Christina TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: HRST-314-01
  In the early twentieth century, struggles against racism, capitalism, and colonialism, encircled the globe. From Irish republicanism in Dublin, Bolshevism in Moscow, revolution in Mexico City, to anti-lynching crusades in Birmingham, these movements represented the largest waves of rebellion sustained by the global economy. This seminar offers an overview of these struggles and spaces. Through examination of primary and secondary sources, students will consider radical social movements from distinct yet overlapping traditions. We will discuss how radicals confronted issues of racism, gender, and nationalism in their revolutionary theories. Taking a uniquely spatial approach, we will observe how geographies of accumulation emerged alongside sites of global resistance. Throughout we will consider these debates' contemporary relevance, observing how global radicalism might be charted in our present world.
3384 AMST-316-01 Freedom & Confinement 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-316-01
  Even as America defines itself as "the land of the free," narratives of confinement have a prominent place in our national literature. In this class we will begin to explore this conundrum, focusing our attention on early American texts in which confinement operates as a structuring principle. We will explore ideas of imprisonment and captivity from colonial America through the nineteenth century, looking at such texts as criminal narratives compiled by ministers and others, captivity narratives, slave narratives, prison writing, and early American novels, among other texts. Along the way we will touch on issues of race and gender as well as institutions of confinement including slavery, prisons and even schools in early America, using appropriate theoretical models to frame our conversations.
3502 AMST-320-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman, Thomas MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-311-01
  NOTE: 9 seats reserved for AMST majors.
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3151 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
1446 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3152 AMST-405-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-805-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3191 AMST-406-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: AMST-806-01, HIST-397-01
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
3302 AMST-445-90 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-845-90, ENGL-845-90
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
1481 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1579 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
1447 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
3540 AMST-801-90 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Miller, Karen W: 6:30PM-9:10PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This seminar, which is required of all American Studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor. This course meets the Spatial methods requirement.
3153 AMST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-405-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3193 AMST-806-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
    Cross-listing: HIST-397-01, AMST-406-01
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
3303 AMST-845-90 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-445-90, ENGL-845-90
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
1608 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1473 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1469 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1470 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1472 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1471 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3213 INTS-358-90 Seminar on Malcolm X 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, AMST, HRST Cross-listing: HIST-358-90
  In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will seek to understand the making of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, most popularly known as Malcolm X, one of Black America's most important political leaders of the 20th century. How did Malcolm X define 'world revolution'? To answer this overarching question, we will critically assess autobiographical and biographical texts and academic literature as well as speeches, travel diaries, music, film, and poetry. Our goal is to situate Malcolm X within a Black radical protest tradition by taking into consideration themes and ideas that are pertinent to the study of the worldwide African Diaspora.
3275 RELG-214-01 Jews in America 1.00 LEC Steiner, Benjamin TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, JWST
  A social and religious history of American Judaism from pre-revolutionary to contemporary times. After examining the era of immigration and “Americanization,” the course will focus on the ethnic, religious, and social structures of American Judaism: the community center, the synagogue, and the federation. (May be counted toward American studies and Jewish studies.)