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Course Listing for URBAN STUDIES - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1427 URST-101-01 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Lukens, David MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MECC - 270 FYR5  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N
  This course is not open to seniors.
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
1485 URST-201-01 From Hartford to World Cities 1.00 LEC Lukens, David M: 1:15PM-3:55PM CT - 105 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: CTYP-201-01
  PR: URST101 or CTYP101 or SOCL 101
  The 21st century is truly a global urban age characterized by the simultaneous decline and revival of post-industrial cities in the United States and the co-existence of boom and poverty in the rapidly industrializing cities in developing countries, as well as by how globalization is exerting a growing impact on urban places and processes everywhere. This course adopts an integrated and comparative approach to studying the local and global characteristics, conditions, and consequences of the growth and transformation of cities and communities. Using Hartford—Trinity's hometown—as a point or place of departure, the course takes students to a set of world or global cities outside the United States, especially a few dynamic mega-cities in developing countries to explore the differences and surprising similarities among them.
2658 URST-204-01 Urbanization and Development 1.00 LEC Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This course takes a comparative approach to urbanization and development. It not only draws case studies from different world regions, but also pays particular attention to China's urban transformation. The first segment, 'foundations of urbanization', introduces key themes and builds up theoretical foundations about urbanization in relation to economic development. Segment two, entitled 'process of urban development', focuses on the physical dimension of the cities, exploring the power of urban landscapes and how cities are built. The third segment, entitled 'people and place', highlights social dimension of urbanization and socio-spatial inequality. Finally, the fourth segment, entitled 'governing global urbanization', explores the changing governance and policy making in response to urban problems.
2585 URST-205-01 Urban Economic Geography 1.00 LEC Annino, Julie W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 70VS - SEM SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  The intent of this course is to introduce students to a variety of economic principles and concepts relating to economic geography. The main focus of the class will center around the themes of globalization, development and place. Discussion will focus on key environmental and human resources as well as their impacts on economic systems across the globe. Students are expected to not only learn key economic terms, but to attribute them to patterns in global and regional economic processes and activities. Topics include, but are not limited to regional specialization, finance and investment, economic governance, transportation and the digital economy.
1537 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Gamble, Julie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - S201 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.
2621 URST-211-01 The Politics of Real Estate 1.00 SEM Yen, Emily TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM 70VS - SEM Y  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: CTYP-211-01
  The course examines the political, social, and economic dimensions of real estate in Hartford and New York. The course delves into the tension between use and exchange values and how political context shapes the balance of power between stakeholders in these cities. Specific topics include growth machine politics, rent control, gentrification, tenant organizing, and Business Improvement Districts. This course has a community learning component and will feature invited guest speakers and include a field trip to New York.
2635 URST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis
Crisostomo, Vialcary
TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - N217 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: HIST-215-01
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.
2583 URST-249-01 Mediterranean Cities 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM GW - L Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: HISP-249-01, LACS-249-01
  NOTE: Class will be in English. Students who enroll as HISP will complete their work in Spanish.
  In today's Europe, states generally seek to engender the highest possible degree of cultural and linguistic uniformity within their borders. Many people thus presume that these societies have always been organized upon this principle. However, the history of the Mediterranean basin tells a very different story. There, until quite recently, the cultures of important cities like Trieste, Barcelona, Istanbul, Alexandria, Tunis, Thessaloniki, Gibraltar and Livorno were characterized by a profoundly multicultural and multilingual ethos. In this class, we will study the histories of these “polyglot cities” and retrace the ethnic and commercial networks that often bound them together. We will also explore the forces that eventually undermined their long-standing diversity and webs of interconnectedness in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
2821 URST-304-01 Developmental Cities in Asia 1.00 SEM Lukens, David W: 6:30PM-9:15PM LIB - 02 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in URST101 or CTYP101
  This course examines urban development in East and Southeast Asia through the lens of the developmental state. The course provides students with an overview of developmental state theory and its origins in the developmentalist policies of Japan, South Korea, China, Indonesia, and the Philippines and demonstrates the impact of these policies on the urban form. Major topics include the impact of developmentalist policies on housing, education, public/private space, and the development of special economic zones and other economic tools. The course uses in-depth case studies of these issues in a variety of East and Southeast Asian cities to demonstrate the characteristics and consequences of developmental urbanism.
2261 URST-321-01 Geographies of Transport 1.00 SEM Gamble, Julie TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 70VS - SEM SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC Cross-listing: URST-821-01, PBPL-822-01
  Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
  Mobility is a permanent aspect of life. Transport infrastructures are a determinant of the spatial, economic, and social structures of cities. This course will introduce students to the spatial and social aspects of transportation and mobility across the globe. This course will act as a forum for research into transport and mobility, including debates on the planning and formation of transport policymaking.
1401 URST-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1396 URST-401-01 Senior Seminar 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth M: 6:30PM-9:10PM 70VS - SEM WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201, Sociology 227 or permission of instructor.
  This course serves as a capstone seminar with two purposes. First, it provides a comparative and integrated treatment of the urban scholarship through an intensive and interdisciplinary reading of advanced books and articles, rigorous discussions, and in-depth writing. This course allows students to widen and deepen the cumulative content and experience they have gained from previous urban courses, study abroad programs, and urban engagement and internship projects. Secondly, by connecting and even tailoring some of the seminar’s content to individual students, the course prepares and guides students to undertake and successfully complete a senior thesis for the Urban Studies major.
2709 URST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Lukens, David TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
2702 URST-497-01 Single Semester Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the director are required for enrollment.
1400 URST-499-01 Senior Thesis, Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
  Written report and formal presentation of a research project. Required of all students who wish to earn honors in Urban Studies. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2714 URST-821-01 Geographies of Transport 1.00 SEM Gamble, Julie TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 70VS - SEM SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-822-01, URST-321-01
  Mobility is a permanent aspect of life. Transport infrastructures are a determinant of the spatial, economic, and social structures of cities. This course will introduce students to the spatial and social aspects of transportation and mobility across the globe. This course will act as a forum for research into transport and mobility, including debates on the planning and formation of transport policymaking.
2715 URST-869-01 Leadership in the Policy Arena 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Sean M: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-869-01
  What is "Leadership?" To what extent can it be defined and practiced according to fundamental general principles? How must the application of such principles be adapted to differing institutional, organizational, and community settings, and to varying situations? Can anyone lead effectively with sufficient opportunity and, if so, to what degree must leadership be "personalized" by each individual? This course will explore leadership principles through readings from a broad spectrum of fields and historical periods and seek to identify the key lessons to be applied to leadership in the current public policy sphere. Students will engage with the course material through a series of short essays and one independent research project focused on a leadership analysis of a contemporary public institution or not-for-profit organization.
  View syllabus
2716 URST-874-01 Practicum 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Sean W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-874-01
  The Practicum is a semester-long opportunity for students to apply and expand their knowledge and technical skills by performing an actual consulting engagement for a public sector client organization. Practicum students will work in small teams to analyze and make recommendations with respect to issues of real significance faced by their clients. Each engagement will combine research, project planning, and problem-solving challenges, as well as substantial client contact. Client organizations are selected from across the policy spectrum to better enable students to pursue subject matters of particular relevance to their studies and career interests. Each engagement will culminate in a final report and formal presentation to the client organization. The Practicum instructor will provide careful guidance and participants will have opportunities to share ideas, experiences, and best practices.
  View syllabus
2010 LAAL-200-01 Action Research Methods Htfd 1.00 LEC Brown, Megan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM CP10 - 101 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  What is the role of academic research in social change? How can students and community groups collaborate effectively to co-create, implement, and use research projects to solve social problems? In this course, students will study the theories and methods of interdisciplinary action research. Emphasizing ethical collaboration, students will learn research design strategies, methods, tools, and research tools in order to work with community partners to solve pressing problems. Students will learn to use a variety of statistical, geographic, and interview data to answer questions, make recommendations, and tell stories about the issues that are most relevant to Hartford.
2011 LAAL-201-01 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan T: 1:30PM-4:10PM CP10 - 101 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2012 LAAL-201-02 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Partridge, Jeffrey W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2013 LAAL-201-03 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan R: 1:30PM-4:10PM CP10 - 101 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2014 LAAL-201-04 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan W: 6:30PM-9:10PM CP10 - 101 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
2627 LAAL-202-01 Hartford Research Pub Health 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM CP10 - 101 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, HRST, URST
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners, with an emphasis on public health and wellness. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.