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Course Listing for PSYCHOLOGY - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1090 PSYC-101-01 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Outten, Robert MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 45 Waitlist available: Y
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1092 PSYC-101-02 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Senland, Amie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 45 Waitlist available: Y
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1303 PSYC-101-03 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC McGrath, Daniel TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 45 Waitlist available: Y
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1410 PSYC-101-04 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC McGrath, Daniel TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 45 Waitlist available: Y
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1122 PSYC-221-01 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Reuman, David MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 36 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1123 PSYC-221-20 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1124 PSYC-221-21 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2351 PSYC-226-01 Social Psychology 1.00 LEC Reuman, David WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  Studies human behavior and cognition in social situations, interactions of individuals in groups, and such topics as affiliation, aggression, and conformity. The course also covers applications of social psychology to such areas as medicine, the workplace, and the law.
2369 PSYC-226-20 Social Psychology Laboratory 0.25 LAB Reuman, David M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226, or concurrent enrollment.
  Studies human behavior and cognition in social situations, interactions of individuals in groups, and such topics as affiliation, aggression, and conformity. The course also covers applications of social psychology to such areas as medicine, the workplace, and the law. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 226.
2352 PSYC-246-01 Community Psychology 1.00 LEC Holt, Laura TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  In this course we will explore the major theories and principles of community psychology, a branch of psychology that explores how societal, cultural, and environmental factors impact people's psychological well-being. Topics will include community-based prevention of psychological disorders, health promotion, citizen participation and empowerment, the value of diversity, and the role of social support in buffering stress. We will also examine the goals and methods of community research, with an emphasis on the development, implementation, and evaluation of community-based programs. Given our proximity to numerous vibrant organizations in Hartford, this course requires that students participate in a community learning activity so that they may gain first-hand experience with community collaboration and put their classroom learning into practice. Enrollment limited.
1411 PSYC-255-01 Cognitive Psychology 1.00 LEC Casserly, Elizabeth TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  The study of knowledge and how people use it, for example, in recall and recognition, controlling attention and dealing with distractions, solving real-world problems, and spoken or written communication. We will emphasize how each piece of our mental abilities fits together with other skills such as perception and language, along with the ways in which our minds and thoughts can diverge from what we subjectively experience of them.
1412 PSYC-255-20 Cognitive Psychology Lab 0.25 LAB Casserly, Elizabeth M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 255, or concurrent enrollment.
  A hands-on introduction to the methods used in behavioral cognitive science research. We will briefly explore a survey of methods and the process used to create a "program of research" rather than isolated experiments. Students will then develop a big-picture question and research program of their own, designing, executing, and analyzing two experiments with related motivations and methods. The relationship between experimental design and the research report paper will also be emphasized. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 255
1112 PSYC-261-01 Brain and Behavior 1.00 LEC Masino, Susan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101 or Biology 140 or Biology 181 or Biology 182 or Biology 183.
  A basic study of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system with a comprehensive analysis of the biological bases of major classes of behavior. Specific topics include: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, sex, and language. Enrollment in laboratory limited. (1.25 course credits with optional laboratory) The course is designed for declared or intended psychology and neuroscience majors.
1135 PSYC-261-20 Brain & Behavior Laboratory 0.25 LAB Masino, Susan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 261-01 or concurrent enrollment.
  A diverse laboratory experience focused on the nervous system. Topics may include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, cognition, and language. The course is designed for declared or intended psychology neuroscience majors. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to PSYC 261.
1548 PSYC-273-01 Abnormal Psychology 1.00 LEC Holt, Laura TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  This course explores how "abnormal" behavior is defined and assessed, and focuses on the epidemiology, etiology (causes), and diagnostic criteria for a range of psychological disorders (e.g., depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, personality disorders), as well as biopsychosocial treatments for these disorders. Students also are introduced to controversial issues in the field.
1448 PSYC-294-01 Forensic Psychology 1.00 LEC Gockel, Jason TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y
  This course will focus on the application of clinical psychology within the legal system. Students will develop an understanding of the role psychologists play in various legal settings including criminal and civil proceedings, police evaluations, and custody evaluations. Areas of focus will include eye witness testimony, criminal psychopathology, psychological assessment and malingering, competency evaluations, the insanity defense, expert witness testimony, and criminal profiling.
2353 PSYC-315-01 Development and Culture 1.00 SEM Anselmi, Dina TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226 or 295
  This seminar will look at current issues in developmental and social psychology including attachment, emotions, cognition, personality, biculturalism, gender, language, socialization and psychopathology from the perspective of cultural psychology. We will focus on the role culture, along with biology play in the outcome of development, as well as influencing our definitions of the process of development. Questions we will address include: How do we define the process of development? Can we integrate development, culture and biology into a coherent model of development? Are there cultural universals? Are current psychological models and methods sufficient to account for the role of culture in development?
2166 PSYC-339-01 Developmental Psychopathology 1.00 SEM Helt, Molly TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 261, or Psychology 270 or Psychology 273, or Psychology 295.
  This course examines the overlap between normal and abnormal child development, exploring the relationship between genetics, prenatal influence, temperament, attachment, trauma, and culture to the ultimate expression of child or adult psychopathology. Emphasis is on risk and protective factors, characteristics of disorders first evident in childhood, and ways that caregivers and societies can promote positive outcomes.
2354 PSYC-346-01 Intergroup Relations 1.00 SEM Outten, Robert WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226.
  This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the psychological study of intergroup relations—how people of different groups relate to one another. The area of intergroup relations focuses on the psychological processes involved with how individuals perceive, judge, reason about, feel, and behave toward people in other groups. Social groups can take many forms, ranging from classic social groups (e.g., race, gender, age, ethnicity, religion, class, sexual orientation), not so classic social groups (e.g., weight, mental ability, physical ability, physical attractiveness) to minimal groups. We will examine some of the causes and consequences of intergroup inequality, and explore ways in which the psychological study of intergroup relations can inform attempts at social change.
2355 PSYC-365-01 Cognitive/SocialNeuroscience 1.00 SEM Raskin, Sarah TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: NESC-865-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 255, 256, or 261, or Neuroscience 201.
  This course examines the way in which brain function influences mental processes and overt action. We will consider a range of cognitive and social functions, primarily from the perspective of neuroscience and draw on such related disciplines as cognitive psychology, social psychology, and computational analysis as needed. The functions to be reviewed include perception, attention, memory, thinking, emotional processing, group behavior, stereotyping and empathy. We will apply these to consider topics such as substance abuse, discrimination, child development, and mental illness.
1549 PSYC-370-01 Psychotherapy 1.00 SEM Lee, Randolph M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 270 or 273. Open only to Psychology majors or Literature & Psychology minors.
  This course is taught as a seminar with limited enrollment and assumes some background. Through study of original theoretical source material, students investigate the nature of psychotherapy, with attention given to its evolution, the therapeutic relationship and communication, and the integrative aspects of diverse methods and theories, such as client-centered, rational-emotive, behavioral, psychoanalytic, Jungian, Gestalt, and group psychotherapy. Films will illustrate various styles of psychotherapy.
1395 PSYC-390-01 Psychology Research Internship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Internship or field work placement, with a required academic component to be determined by the faculty sponsor and student. This internship is for students pursuing research at a field placement. Students need to complete an internship contract with Career Services.
1174 PSYC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A faculty member will supervise a student’s independent examination of topics that fall under the following rubrics: cognitive, social, and gender development (Anselmi); psychopathology, clinical, or counseling psychology (Holt, Lee); neuropsychology (Masino, Raskin); cultural psychology (Chang); social psychology (Chang, Reuman); personality and assessment (Reuman); perception (Mace); psychology of art (Mace); history of psychology (Mace); and language (Anselmi, Mace). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2356 PSYC-401-01 Sen Sem:Psychology of Deafness 1.00 SEM Casserly, Elizabeth T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Hearing plays a surprisingly fundamental role in many aspects of daily life. We take for granted the fact that we can talk over the phone, listen to music, multitask with our hands or eyes during conversation, and use our voices to express happiness, empathy, sadness, or humor. In this seminar, we will explore all the ways in which a lack of hearing (deafness) affects the human experience – from the biological basis of deafness and hearing to the cultural pride deaf individuals often feel regarding their identities. Through readings, discussions, and projects we will examine questions like: How do deaf individuals experience music and humor? How does deafness impact neurological and social development? Do deaf infants still coo and babble as they grow?
1495 PSYC-402-01 Sen Seminar: The Social Self 1.00 SEM Helt, Molly TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course will examine how we construct a sense of self as a social being. We will integrate research from various areas of psychology to address the following questions (among others): How did you, as a baby, learn that you were separate from your mother? Who is in charge of your actions and how do we figure that out? To what extent are you shaped by your circumstances and the way others view you? What happens when there is a breakdown of boundaries between the self and others, and what does this tell us about conditions such as autism and psychopathy?
1175 PSYC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1176 PSYC-490-01 Research Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Students may assist professors in conducting research studies. Hours and duties will be determined on the basis of project needs and student interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1555 PSYC-492-01 Senior Thesis Colloquium Pt 2 0.25 SEM Senland, Amie W: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Concurrent enrollment in Psyc 499-01 is required
  Senior Thesis Colloquium is a year-long colloquium series for students completing senior theses in psychology. Topics include navigating one’s thesis, preparing Thesis Prospectus presentations, building a strong Introduction section, communicating results, and preparing a poster presentation. Goals of this colloquium series include fostering a sense of community, building relevant skills, and helping students develop critical abilities for graduate school and/or future jobs. The course will meet 4 times a semester, dates and time to be determined. (.25 course credit is considered pending in the first semester; .25 credit will be awarded for completion in the second semester). Required for senior thesis students.
1163 PSYC-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Concurrent enrollment in PSYC 492-01 is required
  The thesis is a year-long research project sponsored by a member of the Psychology Department. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.) Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2333 ENGR-311-01 Electrophysiology of the CNS 1.00 LEC Blaise, J. Harry TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with NESC, PSYC
  This introductory course in cellular neurophysiology presents a modern and important body of knowledge in a highly integrated fashion drawing from the contributions of anatomists, physiologists, and electrical engineers. The basic biochemical properties of the membrane and sensory transduction, neural transmission, and synaptic interaction are considered in sequential order. Then the collective action of neurons in the form of compound electrical responses, and the electroencephalogram are discussed as means of understanding the neural circuitry involved in various behavioral modalities such as sleep-walking oscillation, pain modulation, etc. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental design. Ongoing research studies illustrating the concepts and techniques presented in the course will be discussed. Open to all junior and senior life science and physical science majors.
1064 HFPR-201-01 Topics in Health Care 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison R: 1:30PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, NESC, PSYC
  Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Health Fellows Program.
1065 HFPR-202-01 Health Care Research 2.00 SEM Hunter, Amy TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, NESC, PSYC
  Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Health Fellows Program.
2384 NESC-101-01 The Brain 1.00 LEC Church, William MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with BIOL, PSYC
  Recent developments in neuroscience have revolutionized our views of familiar human experiences such as locomotion, substance abuse, mental illness, sleep, and memorization. Through highly enjoyable and selected readings, presentations by visiting faculty, demonstrations and other activities, we will explore the foundations of this field as well as recent discoveries. The overall objective of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of neuroscience, enabling them to make important decisions that may affect their lives.
2473 RELG-260-01 Meditation, Medicine, & Mind 1.00 SEM Fifield, Justin TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with PSYC
  This course examines the relationship between traditional meditation practices and their contemporary applications in therapeutic, clinical, and neuropsychological settings. We will question to what extent contemporary practices remain true to the historical traditions, and to what extent such a question even matters. If a meditative practice works in a clinical setting, without recourse to traditional understanding, is such an application valid? In what ways do modern institutions - the marketplace, the clinic, the laboratory - alter the way meditation is translated into the contemporary world? Readings will range across classic Asian texts, modern meditation manuals, and research from the fields of medicine and neuroscience.