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Course Listing for PUBLIC POLICY & LAW - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2495 PBPL-123-01 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Weiner, Matthew T: 6:30PM-9:00PM SH - N130  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students. 10 seats reserved for sophomores.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
2771 PBPL-123-02 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Horowitz, Amy T: 6:30PM-9:00PM MC - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
1455 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Moskowitz, Rachel TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 102 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for sophomores and 15 seats for first years
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
1113 PBPL-202-01 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 213 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
1256 PBPL-202-02 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 311 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
1331 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Moskowitz, Rachel TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S205 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with POLS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
2619 PBPL-252-01 Art and the Public Good 1.00 SEM Power, Katharine W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 307 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Is art a public good? Is government good for art? Students will explore these questions by examining what happens when U.S. taxpayer dollars are used to fund the arts. Course topics will include: the depression era federal arts projects and the dream of a "cultural democracy" that inspired them; the State Department's export of art across the globe during the Cold War era; the legal and congressional battles over offensive art that threatened to shut down the National Endowment for the Arts during the 1990s; and former Mayor Giuliani's attempt to withdraw funding from the Brooklyn Museum of Art following public outcry over a provocative depiction of the Virgin Mary.
1502 PBPL-302-01 Law & Environmental Policy 1.00 SEM DiBella, Lori W: 6:45PM-9:25PM MC - 205 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the development of environmental policy and regulation in the U.S. through analysis of case studies of national environmental policy debates and landmark environmental legislation. The policy challenges presented by global climate change are a special focus. Students gain an understanding of the framework and policy approaches underlying local, state and federal laws regulating air, water, toxic waste, and use of natural resources. In addition, students identify and research a current local, state, national or global environmental issue and then draft a policy memorandum which summarizes the issue, describes available policy choices, and proposes a course of action.
2417 PBPL-365-01 Crime,Punishment&Public Policy 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM SH - N129  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  This course considers the origins of mass incarceration, the role of race, gender and poverty in our criminal justice system, and current proposals for reform. Topics include mandatory minimum sentences, plea bargaining and prosecutorial discretion; the criminal procedure revolution of the 1960s and its aftermath; false confessions, forensic evidence and post-conviction review; probation, diversionary programs and sex offender registration; and tribal sovereignty, jurisdictional disputes, and the impact on indigenous survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.
2418 PBPL-375-01 Federalism and Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 205 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with POLS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  Federalism, a defining American constitutional principle, is a system in which political power is shared by the national government and state and local entities. This structure of “dual sovereignty,” which has been subject to ongoing interpretation, has informed some of the most divisive controversies in American history. Currently, executives, legislators, and the courts at all levels of government are engaged in robust debates about the degree to which power should be shared and whether governing authority should reside with national or with state and local officials. We will focus on how the American federal structure shapes arguments and choices in three contentious policy areas: Immigration, Abortion, and Environmental Regulations
2133 PBPL-398-01 Public Policy Law Intern & Sem 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne W: 6:15PM-9:15PM MC - 309 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.
1178 PBPL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Submission fo the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1323 PBPL-401-01 Curr Iss: Supreme Ct & Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 309 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  This course is only open to senior Public Policy and Law majors.
  This seminar will focus on the Supreme Court in transition. We will explore competing theories of constitutional interpretation that have characterized the Rehnquist court and examine specific cases that are representative of the court's work. We will study contending theories of the Supreme Court's role in our constitutional framework, and we will consider how new appointees to the court may shift the balance in important areas of jurisprudence that have become increasingly contentious, including abortion, LGBT rights, immigration, and gun rights.
1535 PBPL-414-01 Cur Iss:Localism/States Rights 1.00 SEM Moskowitz, Rachel W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 205 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is only open to senior Public Policy and Law majors.
  This seminar will explore questions about the development and purpose of federalism, states’ rights, and localism. We will consider competing ideological frameworks around support and opposition of local and state power – for example, from the notion of laboratories of democracy to states’ rights resistance in the face of claims of federal overreach. We will study state and local policies in the current political era and pay particular attention to the development of policies as both progressive resistance to and conservative support of the Trump administration. In this context, we will study battles not just between states or localities and the federal government, but also conflicts between states and cities. We will also consider the role of other institutions, like the media and the courts, in these conflicts.
1179 PBPL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1255 PBPL-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1180 PBPL-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, availaboe in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
2681 PBPL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
1557 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC McMahon, Kevin R: 6:30PM-9:00PM LIB - 103 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: POLS-412-01
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
2532 PBPL-822-01 Geographies of Transport 1.00 SEM Gamble, Julie TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 70VS - SEM SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: URST-821-01, URST-321-01
  Mobility is a permanent aspect of life. Transport infrastructures are a determinant of the spatial, economic, and social structures of cities. This course will introduce students to the spatial and social aspects of transportation and mobility across the globe. This course will act as a forum for research into transport and mobility, including debates on the planning and formation of transport policymaking.
1558 PBPL-840-01 Budget Mgt & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Sinani, Elda T: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - S205  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course will focus on the practical aspects of public budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the "how to's" of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis.
  View syllabus
2177 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Candace W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - T408  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
2189 PBPL-869-01 Leadership in the Policy Arena 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Sean M: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: URST-869-01
  What is "Leadership?" To what extent can it be defined and practiced according to fundamental general principles? How must the application of such principles be adapted to differing institutional, organizational, and community settings, and to varying situations? Can anyone lead effectively with sufficient opportunity and, if so, to what degree must leadership be "personalized" by each individual? This course will explore leadership principles through readings from a broad spectrum of fields and historical periods and seek to identify the key lessons to be applied to leadership in the current public policy sphere. Students will engage with the course material through a series of short essays and one independent research project focused on a leadership analysis of a contemporary public institution or not-for-profit organization.
  View syllabus
2616 PBPL-870-01 Polarization and Policy-Making 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LIB - 181  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: POLS-311-01
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  This course will examine the interaction between policy and polarization. We will first survey the contours and history of polarization in America with a focus on the development of the national political parties. We will then examine the interaction of policy making and polarization at the national and state levels: how does polarization affect policy making at the national and state levels; how does policy affect polarization; why have some states become more polarized than others; and how does that polarization affect policy making at the state level? Finally, we will assess the relationship between policy making and polarization at the national and state levels using the case studies of health care and abortion.
2212 PBPL-874-01 Practicum 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Sean W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC Cross-listing: URST-874-01
  The Practicum is a semester-long opportunity for students to apply and expand their knowledge and technical skills by performing an actual consulting engagement for a public sector client organization. Practicum students will work in small teams to analyze and make recommendations with respect to issues of real significance faced by their clients. Each engagement will combine research, project planning, and problem-solving challenges, as well as substantial client contact. Client organizations are selected from across the policy spectrum to better enable students to pursue subject matters of particular relevance to their studies and career interests. Each engagement will culminate in a final report and formal presentation to the client organization. The Practicum instructor will provide careful guidance and participants will have opportunities to share ideas, experiences, and best practices.
  View syllabus
1166 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1172 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1170 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
1171 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
1169 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
2263 ECON-217-01 Econ of Health & Health Care 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - S201 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Analysis of the structure of health care markets using economic principles Evaluation of current health care policies and their effects on cost, access and quality. Topics covered include the production of and demand for health and medical care; information asymmetries between patients, doctors, and payers; health insurance coverage; the effects of managed care (including HMOs) on competition, efficiency, and quality; training and practice of physicians; hospitals; prescription drug pricing; government regulations; Medicare and Medicaid; health care reform.
1294 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Castillo, Elise M: 6:30PM-9:10PM MC - 213 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200 or Public Policy and Law major, or permission of instructor
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
1051 ENVS-149-01 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LEC Bazilio, Arianne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 106 GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, GLBLSTDS, PBPL
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 4 seniors, 4 juniors, 8 sophomores, and 10 first-year students, there will be 6 additional seats assigned by the instructor.
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
2450 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet W: 1:15PM-3:50PM MC - 225 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, CLIC, EDUC, GLBLSTD, PBPL, WMGS
  This course examines the legal, social, political, and religious dimensions of citizenship and belonging with a focus on immigrants and refugees resettling in the United States (and Hartford, in particular). Using ethnographic case studies as well as autobiographical, historical, policy, social media, filmic and literary materials, students will explore topics like American immigration history and law, theories of transnational migration and social inclusion, debates about immigration reform and integration policies, and concepts like superdiversity, cosmopolitanism, and mobility justice in understanding contemporary migration, as it is shaped by forces of nativism, political upheaval, environmental devastation and the global economy. Course typically includes a community learning component.
2421 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LIB - 181 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, PBPL
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
2304 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 307 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, PBPL
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.