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Course Listing for LANGUAGE AND CULTURE STUDIES - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2579 LACS-215-01 Reading Climate: Lit to Action 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENVS-215-01
  In this course we will read major works of contemporary environmental literature that center on the changing climate in the Anthropocene and explore the consequences of global warming: for humanity and the planet as a whole. The novels, short stories and essays-sometimes referred to as "eco-fiction"-are selected from across the globe, and we will read them as literature as well as calls for action to combat the problem that is bound to define the 21st century. We will consider the science behind the stories and examine their social, political and ethical dimensions. The questions that will stay with us throughout are: how to respond meaningfully to the urgency of climate change; and how to turn our reading into action.
  View syllabus
2179 LACS-236-01 Japanese Crime Lit & Film 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - 106 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: JAPN-236-01, INTS-236-01
  This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
2581 LACS-249-01 Mediterranean Cities 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM GW - L Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: URST-249-01, HISP-249-01
  NOTE: Class will be in English. Students who enroll as HISP will complete their work in Spanish.
  In today's Europe, states generally seek to engender the highest possible degree of cultural and linguistic uniformity within their borders. Many people thus presume that these societies have always been organized upon this principle. However, the history of the Mediterranean basin tells a very different story. There, until quite recently, the cultures of important cities like Trieste, Barcelona, Istanbul, Alexandria, Tunis, Thessaloniki, Gibraltar and Livorno were characterized by a profoundly multicultural and multilingual ethos. In this class, we will study the histories of these “polyglot cities” and retrace the ethnic and commercial networks that often bound them together. We will also explore the forces that eventually undermined their long-standing diversity and webs of interconnectedness in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
2464 LACS-250-01 Germany and the Cold War 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM SH - S201 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: GRMN-250-01
  In this course students explore life in divided Germany as portrayed in literature and film from both sides of the border. Against the backdrop of Nazi Germany's defeat, the daunting task of rebuilding the country—free market or soviet style—and the ebb and flow of Cold War tension, students become familiar with major writers and filmmakers taking the pulse of the German people. Featured prominently are the city of Berlin as the epicenter of the Cold War, the nuclear arms' race and peace efforts, coming to terms with Germany's Nazi past, the dream of "normalcy", and the fall of the Berlin Wall.—Taught in English
  View syllabus
2624 LACS-259-01 The Postwar German Film 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: GRMN-259-01
  This course will explore the social and political landscape of postwar Germany from 1945 to the present by looking at a broad range of films from East and West Germany, and Austria, that encompass a wide variety of genres, filmmakers, and movements. The themes examined will include, but not be limited to, the creation of a new cinema after World War II, filmmaking during the Cold War, avant-garde cinema, German history through film, socially critical cinema, and Germany today. Directors will include Wolfgang Staudte, Volker Schlöndorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold.
  View syllabus
2507 LACS-262-01 Fairytales in German Tradition 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - S205 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: GRMN-262-01
  For centuries fairytales have served as powerful cultural currency, transmitting ideas about morality, gender, identity, nationalism, and childhood. Running the risk that it will ruin fairytales by vivisection, this course will approach the genre of German-language fairytales from a critical perspective, taking into account their historical context, psychological and philosophical interpretations, and how certain fairytales have changed over time into their contemporary iterations. Special attention will be paid to the fairytales collected by the Brothers Grimm, while also exploring their intersections with fairytales in other cultural and historical contexts. The goal of this course is for students to explore texts with whose content they may be familiar, in order to then gain a deeper understanding of their cultural, historical, and psychological dimensions.
2679 LACS-272-01 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - S205 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ITAL-272-01, FORG-272-01
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
2057 LACS-274-01 Food in Ital His Soc Art 1.00 LEC Del Puppo, Dario MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 137 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ITAL-274-01
  The saying, “A tavola non s’invecchia” (“One does not age at the supper table”), expresses the importance of food and eating for Italians. In this course, we will examine the relationship between food and culture in Italy, from the Romans to the present, through a variety of readings and tasting experiences. Topics include: the importing and exporting of different foods in antiquity as an instance of cultural and economic exchange; medieval beliefs about intellectual and physical aptitudes associated with diet; the representation of food in art, literature, and cinema; regional cuisines and cultural identities; and the language of food. We will also discuss Italian and Italian-American cuisine as the reflection of related, yet very different, cultures. (Listed as both LACS 274 and ITAL 274.)
2641 LACS-276-01 Zombie Fascism(s) 0.50 SEM King, Joshua W: 6:30PM-9:00PM SH - T302 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ITAL-276-01
  How do contemporary neo-fascist and anti-fascist movements in Europe and North America draw on the original fascist project for their ideology, culture, propaganda, and organizational principles? In what ways do contemporary "fascist" movements differ from the historic ones from which they draw inspiration? To what extent does it make sense use the designation "fascist" to describe these groups? In this colloquium, we will continue the conversation begun in LACS 275 (Italian Fascism and Anti-Fascism) by interrogating the ideologies of these contemporary movements, as well as the resistance to them, in light of historical European fascism and anti-fascism.
2466 LACS-277-01 Wmn, Italy & the Mediterranean 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N128 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: ITAL-277-01
  This course examines the cultural, political, and social identity of women in contemporary Italy as represented in literature and in film. Italy is also a country of mass migration and, therefore, many recent migrant women from the Mediterranean region are also writing about their experience and about life in Italy. Topics include: Women writers as active agents of social and political change in patriarchal Italy, the clash of cultural identities and roles, and the impact of post-colonial theory and practice on gender in Italy. Authors and filmmakers include Ribka Sibhatu, Randa Ghazy, Gabriella Ghermandi and Cristina Ali Farah
2053 LACS-290-01 Italian Cinema 1.00 LEC King, Joshua TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: ITAL-290-01
  A study and discussion of Italian cinema from neorealism to the present. The course will cover both formal and thematic trends in the films of the noted postwar Italian directors Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, and Luchino Visconti. The course will also consider the trend away from reliance on literary texts toward the development of personal expressions by such author/directors as Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Lina Wertmüller, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Maurizio Nichetti, and others. Film screenings will be in Italian with English subtitles. Lectures and coursework will be in English. Students wishing to apply this course toward the major in Italian must secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. Faithful attendance is required. (Listed as both LACS 290 and ITAL 290.)
2469 LACS-335-01 Dante: The Divine Comedy 1.00 LEC Del Puppo, Dario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - T308 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ITAL-335-01
  An intensive study of the Divine Comedy (in translation) with particular emphasis on the historical and aesthetic significance of this 'summa.' Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Italian should receive permission of the instructor. (Listed as both LACS 335 and ITAL 335.)
1230 LACS-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1463 LACS-401-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N
  The capstone project for the World Literature and Culture Studies major. To enroll, students must submit a completed special registration form available from the Registrar's Office.
1231 LACS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1226 ARAB-102-01 Intensive Elementary Arabic II 1.50 LEC Hanna, Kifah TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM
W: 10:00AM-11:15AM
SH - T408
SH - T308
HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 101 or equivalent.
  Designed to develop basic language skills learned in Arabic 101. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour per week. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1008 ARAB-202-01 Intermediate Arabic II 1.00 LEC Hanna, Kifah TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - T408 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Arabic 201, leading to a completion of essential basic grammatical constructions as well as further conversational practice. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1009 ARAB-302-01 Intermediate Arabic IV 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 301 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Arabic 301, presenting alternative stylistic tools for oral and written communication, with a vigorous expansion of vocabulary. Lab work required. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1010 ARAB-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1300 ARAB-402-01 Adv Arabic II: Comp & Style 1.00 LEC Hanna, Kifah TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 401 or equivalent.
  This course is a continuation of Arabic 401. We will closely read and analyze complex authentic texts in order to develop a high level of proficiency and grammatical accuracy in Modern Standard Arabic and colloquial Levantine. We will continue to vigorously focus on the root and pattern system. Students will study new grammatical aspects such as the imperative, the prohibitive, hollow and weak verbs, assimilation in and basic meanings of certain awzan, and the different types of grammatical objects (to name a few). Students will learn different styles of narration and significantly expand their vocabulary repertoire.
1029 CHIN-102-01 Intens Elem Chinese II 1.50 LEC Wang, Jui-Chien MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM
R: 6:30PM-7:45PM
MC - 313 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Chinese 101, with increased emphasis on conversational practice. An additional 200 characters will be learned. Students are expected to master most of the spoken patterns by the end of the semester. Three hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1027 CHIN-202-01 Intens Interm Chinese II 1.00 - 1.50 LEC Wang, Jui-Chien MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM MC - 313 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 201 or equivalent.
1030 CHIN-302-01 Advanced Chinese II 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM MC - 311 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  Concentration on advanced writing and speaking skills, further acquisition of compound characters, and further extensive practice in complex reading. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1259 CHIN-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2548 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Wang, Jui-Chien MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - T302 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
1028 CHIN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1056 FREN-102-01 French II 1.00 - 1.50 LEC Provitola, Blase MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - N128 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Three hours of class per week.
1390 FREN-102-02 French II 1.00 - 1.50 LEC Evelein, Isabel MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - N129 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Three hours of class per week.
2453 FREN-151-01 French Film Festival 0.50 LEC Humphreys, Karen TBA TBA Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM, LACS
  A half-credit course offered in conjunction with the annual spring French Film Festival. Class meetings and film screenings will take place from March 29 through April 4, 2020. Two mandatory workshops will take place prior to and following the festival at a time to be announced. Students are required to attend all film showings. Students taking the course for credit in French will be required to do all written work in French and to attend French language versions of the two supplemental workshops. Course may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
1227 FREN-201-01 Intermediate French I 1.00 LEC Evelein, Isabel MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - N129 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 102 or equivalent.
  Review of basic grammatical concepts and development of fundamental language skills, with increasing emphasis on written expression and spoken accuracy. Use is made of video-based presentations. Since significant linguistic progress cannot be achieved in 201 alone, students wishing to acquire proficiency should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence.
1058 FREN-202-01 Intermediate French II 1.00 LEC Provitola, Blase MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM SH - N128 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  Further reinforcement of written and spoken skills, with continuing practice in the use of complex grammatical structures and greater emphasis on the mastery of contemporary usage through extensive class discussion, reading, and writing.
1057 FREN-241-01 Adv Composition & Style 1.00 LEC Humphreys, Karen TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LIB - 174 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  Development of a high level of proficiency through the reading and analysis of texts and films in contemporary idiomatic French, with considerable emphasis on attainment of grammatical accuracy.
2456 FREN-252-01 Modern French Literature 1.00 LEC Humphreys, Karen TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LIB - 174 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This course will be a survey of the major texts of the 19th and 20th century France. Principles of literary history and literary appreciation will be emphasized. Prerequisite: French 241 or equivalent
2457 FREN-281-01 Conversational French 1.00 LEC Evelein, Isabel MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM HL - 123 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent, or permission of instructor
  This course is designed for students who want to acquire greater proficiency in their oral expression and are interested in current events. We will examine current political, social, historical and educational issues as they appear in French newspapers and magazines such as L’Express, Le Monde, Le Nouvel Observateur and other online resources. Students will participate in class discussions, prepare oral reports and conduct presentations on the issues under study.
2564 FREN-355-01 Franco-Maghrebi Cultures 1.00 SEM Provitola, Blase MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TC - 142 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
  This course provides an introduction to some of the major issues impacting the countries of formerly-colonized Francophone North Africa (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia), commonly known as the Maghreb, and their diasporas in France. By putting excerpts of novels, memoirs, films, and other media in conversation with the popular press, this course will encourage students to reflect upon contemporary social issues between France and North Africa from the 1960s to the present. As we learn about race, religion, colonization, and immigration, a particular emphasis will be placed upon how issues of sex and gender impact cultural and literary representations. Topics may include the headscarf debates, family structure, and sexuality. Possible authors and filmmakers may include Leïla Sebbar, Abdellah Taïa, Nina Bouraoui, Farid Boudjellal, and Abdellatif Kechiche. Course conducted in French.
1249 FREN-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1320 FREN-401-01 Senior Seminar 1.00 SEM Kippur, Sara TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - T302 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one 300-level course in French literature or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.
  This seminar is required of all seniors majoring or minoring in French. Over the term, students will work collaboratively on the various papers they are writing by way of integrating exercises in their major or minor, and the whole class will undertake a number of readings in common in order to provide informed criticism of one another’s papers. Depending on enrollment, the class may also spend part of the semester considering a special topic, author, or genre in French studies.
1248 FREN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1060 GRMN-102-01 Intens Elemtry German II 1.50 LEC Evelein, Johannes MWF: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of German 101, with completion of the study of essential grammar, further vocabulary building through oral and written practice, practice in reading, and discussions of cultural contexts.
  View syllabus
1099 GRMN-202-01 Intermediate German II 1.00 LEC Doerre, Jason MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MC - 305 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of German 201, with the addition of expository material on German life and culture for discussion and writing practice.
  View syllabus
2465 GRMN-250-01 Germany and the Cold War 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM SH - S201 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-250-01
  In this course students explore life in divided Germany as portrayed in literature and film from both sides of the border. Against the backdrop of Nazi Germany's defeat, the daunting task of rebuilding the country—free market or soviet style—and the ebb and flow of Cold War tension, students become familiar with major writers and filmmakers taking the pulse of the German people. Featured prominently are the city of Berlin as the epicenter of the Cold War, the nuclear arms' race and peace efforts, coming to terms with Germany's Nazi past, the dream of "normalcy", and the fall of the Berlin Wall.—Taught in English
  View syllabus
2625 GRMN-259-01 The Postwar German Film 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-259-01
  This course will explore the social and political landscape of postwar Germany from 1945 to the present by looking at a broad range of films from East and West Germany, and Austria, that encompass a wide variety of genres, filmmakers, and movements. The themes examined will include, but not be limited to, the creation of a new cinema after World War II, filmmaking during the Cold War, avant-garde cinema, German history through film, socially critical cinema, and Germany today. Directors will include Wolfgang Staudte, Volker Schlöndorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold.
  View syllabus
2508 GRMN-262-01 Fairytales in German Tradition 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - S205 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-262-01
  For centuries fairytales have served as powerful cultural currency, transmitting ideas about morality, gender, identity, nationalism, and childhood. Running the risk that it will ruin fairytales by vivisection, this course will approach the genre of German-language fairytales from a critical perspective, taking into account their historical context, psychological and philosophical interpretations, and how certain fairytales have changed over time into their contemporary iterations. Special attention will be paid to the fairytales collected by the Brothers Grimm, while also exploring their intersections with fairytales in other cultural and historical contexts. The goal of this course is for students to explore texts with whose content they may be familiar, in order to then gain a deeper understanding of their cultural, historical, and psychological dimensions.
  View syllabus
2458 GRMN-305-01 German-Jewish Writers 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - T308 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
  This course will examine the contribution of Jewish writers to German literature, philosophy and culture. Of central concern will be how these writers negotiate and theorize their dual identity as Jew and German through the form and content of their writings. Issues of national, cultural and linguistic identification, acculturation, and self-criticism will be traced out through texts dating from the Enlightenment to the modern era. Readings to include: Mendelssohn, Varnhagen, Schlegel, Heine, Schnitzler, Freud, Kafka, Lasker-Schüler, Arendt, Celan.
  View syllabus
1143 GRMN-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2766 GRMN-499-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the director are required for enrollment.
1181 HEBR-102-01 Elem Modern Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - T308 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with JWST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 101 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 101 with emphasis on increasing vocabulary, understanding, writing and speaking skills with widening exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
2591 HEBR-302-01 Advanced Modrn Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - T408 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with JWST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 301 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 301 with emphasis on reading short novels and Israeli newspapers as well as viewing and discussing selected videos and movies. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
1420 HISP-102-01 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Flores, Laura
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM LSC - 131 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
  View syllabus
1421 HISP-102-02 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Flores, Laura
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 131 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2040 HISP-102-03 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Aldrete, Diana
MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2631 HISP-102-04 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Alverio, Edwin
MWF: 8:00AM-8:50AM SH - S205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1477 HISP-201-01 Intermediate Spanish I 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Aldrete, Diana
MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2632 HISP-201-02 Intermediate Spanish I 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM MC - 307 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1247 HISP-201-03 Intermediate Spanish I 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Aldrete, Diana
MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2752 HISP-201-04 Intermediate Spanish I 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 8:00AM-8:50AM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1102 HISP-202-01 Intermediate Spanish II 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LIB - 181 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 201 or equivalent.
  The review of grammar begun in Hispanic Studies 201 will be completed. In addition, there will be readings and discussion of contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature, treating varied literary and cultural selections with a view to vocabulary-building and the reinforcement of the principles of grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the development of competence in oral and written expression. Generally for students with 4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1103 HISP-202-02 Intermediate Spanish II 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 201 or equivalent.
  The review of grammar begun in Hispanic Studies 201 will be completed. In addition, there will be readings and discussion of contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature, treating varied literary and cultural selections with a view to vocabulary-building and the reinforcement of the principles of grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the development of competence in oral and written expression. Generally for students with 4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2605 HISP-215-01 Creative Writing in Spanish 1.00 SEM Souto Alcalde, David TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 305 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of writing short fiction in Spanish. Students will examine methods of constructing narrative tension, fictional climaxes, ambiguity, character sketches, portrayals of social class, different kinds of autobiographies, dialogues, monologues, and landscape, interior and object descriptions. This course will enhance students' knowledge of Spanish language by focusing on the writing skills necessary to do so. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal style. They will be introduced to different fictional styles and will analyze vocabulary and narrative techniques of masters of the short fiction such as Ribeyro, Lispector, Borges, Cervantes or Valle-Inclán among others. Students will share and comment on each other's work in workshops and will be required to produce a final short fiction piece.
1109 HISP-221-01 Advanced Grammar & Composition 1.00 LEC Melendez, Priscilla MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LIB - 181 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  Emphasis on composition work in conjunction with a review of grammar, especially of the more difficult and subtle aspects, together with a consideration of stylistics. The writings of selected modern Hispanic authors will serve as models. Generally for students with 5+ years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1447 HISP-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Hubert, Rosario MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - T302 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: PORT-223-01
  Prerequisite: the equivalent of two semesters of study of any Romance Language (Spanish, French, Italian, Catalan)
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
2582 HISP-249-01 Mediterranean Cities 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM GW - L Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: URST-249-01, LACS-249-01
  NOTE: Class will be in English. Students who enroll as HISP will complete their work in Spanish.
  In today's Europe, states generally seek to engender the highest possible degree of cultural and linguistic uniformity within their borders. Many people thus presume that these societies have always been organized upon this principle. However, the history of the Mediterranean basin tells a very different story. There, until quite recently, the cultures of important cities like Trieste, Barcelona, Istanbul, Alexandria, Tunis, Thessaloniki, Gibraltar and Livorno were characterized by a profoundly multicultural and multilingual ethos. In this class, we will study the histories of these “polyglot cities” and retrace the ethnic and commercial networks that often bound them together. We will also explore the forces that eventually undermined their long-standing diversity and webs of interconnectedness in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
1104 HISP-262-01 Iberian Culture II 1.00 LEC Harrington, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM GW - L GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
  This course introduces students to the set of cultural problems that have shaped Spain’s contemporary development. It will do so through the study of novels, films, and historical narrative. Special emphasis given to the cultural history of the Franco years (1939-1975) and the country’s more recent transition to democracy (1975-1992).
1105 HISP-264-01 Latin American Culture II 1.00 LEC Hubert, Rosario MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM SH - N215 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
  This course focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the Latin American nations. Emphasis will be on to the construction of national identities during the 19th century as well as main historic-political events of the 20th century. Discussions will be based on readings, documentaries, and feature films. Latin American newspapers on the Internet are used to inform our debates of current events. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1111 HISP-270-01 Intro to Cultural Analysis 1.00 LEC Melendez, Priscilla MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MECC - 260 Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course serves as a transition to advanced courses in Spanish language, culture, and literature. Students will develop analytical skills through an intense exploration of cultural production in the Hispanic world and through an examination of diverse literary genres, film, and current events. The focus will be on improving the necessary linguistic and critical thinking skills that are the fundamental foundation for literary and cultural analysis in advanced Spanish study.
1125 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LIB - 181 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1304 HISP-290-01 Studying in HISP World Colloq 0.50 SEM Souto Alcalde, David TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 305 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This course is designed to provide students returning from study abroad in Barcelona, Buenos Aires, and other Spanish-speaking venues (summer, semester, or year-long programs) with a forum within which they can share, compare, and process analytically and historically the difficulties, conflicts, absences, and discoveries that they experienced in their time abroad. They will then be asked to investigate how these experiences have affected their view of the social and cultural norms of U.S. culture. (Prerequisite: Study abroad in an approved program in a Spanish-speaking country.)
2565 HISP-307-01 Modern Spain and Italy 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM GW - L GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
  Italy has existed as a nation-state for slightly less than 150 years. For many more years than this, however, the territory it currently occupies was divided into numerous principalities. For more than four centuries starting in in the early 1300s, a number of the more important of these principalities were controlled by monarchies located in today’s Spain. In this course, we will analyze the rich history of Hispanic-Italian coexistence, endeavoring first to discern some of the reasons why this important history is not better known, then examining the many channels of "cultural commerce" between the peoples of the Iberian and Italian Peninsulas in the early modern and contemporary periods, as well as in the context of today in today’s united Europe.
2606 HISP-309-01 The Fight for Freedom 1.00 SEM Souto Alcalde, David TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 309 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  What's freedom? Depending on your ideology, freedom can mean many different things. Is freedom a human potentiality that must be universally assured by the intervention of the state (i.e., granting education, healthcare and subsidies to anybody, regulating prices, etc.) or is freedom a universal human quality that is fatally undermined by the intervention of the state? This seminar explores the origin of our notions of freedom in the early modern Hispanic world, a period in which capitalism emerges as a new socioeconomic model that redefines completely our understanding of freedom. We will also scrutinize the ways in which freedom and terror are closely interrelated. Our readings will include poems, marginal autobiographies, theater, New World chronicles, treatises on economy and politics, paintings and short novels.
1258 HISP-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1127 HISP-401-01 Senior Seminar 1.00 SEM Souto Alcalde, David TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 309 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 11 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  This course is open to seniors only.
  Required for graduation with a major in Spanish (Plan A) or Plan B with Spanish as primary language. In this final exercise, students will engage theoretical and critical readings around a common theme related to the Spanish-speaking world and will write a 25-page analytical research paper on a specific topic related to the common theme.
1257 HISP-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2023 HIST-210-01 Paris:Capital of 19th Century 1.00 LEC Kete, Kathleen TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FRENCH
  In this history of Paris we explore the revolutions in politics, culture and class which usher into being one of the most dynamic and influential spaces in European and world history. Topics include the revolutions of 1830 and 1848; the rebuilding of Paris during the Second Empire; and the invention of modern art by the Impressionists and their successors. We also discuss the Commune of 1871 (in Marx’s view, the first socialist revolution), the Dreyfus Affair (which brings anti-Semitism to the center stage of European politics), and the advent of the ‘New Woman’ whose dress and behavior crystallize a feminist challenge to the masculine politics of the age.
1068 ITAL-101-01 Elementary Italian I 1.00 - 1.50 LEC King, Joshua MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM LSC - 136 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  NOTE: Students who studied Italian for three or more years in high school may not enroll in ITAL 101.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take 101 and 102 in sequence. Other than beginning students must have permission of instructor to enroll.
1100 ITAL-101-02 Elementary Italian I 1.00 - 1.50 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM LIB - 119 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  NOTE: Students who studied Italian for three or more years in high school may not enroll in ITAL 101.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take 101 and 102 in sequence. Other than beginning students must have permission of instructor to enroll.
1069 ITAL-102-01 Elementary Italian II 1.00 - 1.50 LEC Palma, Giuliana MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - S205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1235 ITAL-102-02 Elementary Italian II 1.00 - 1.50 LEC Palma, Giuliana MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
2633 ITAL-102-03 Elementary Italian II 1.00 - 1.50 LEC Palma, Giuliana MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
2659 ITAL-201-01 Inter Ital I:Conv & Comp 1.00 LEC Palma, Giuliana MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM SH - S205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 102 or equivalent.
  A review of basic grammar learned in the first-year intensive Italian courses (101 and 102) is integrated with oral and writing practice on topics intended to introduce students to contemporary Italian culture. There will be readings of short stories, newspaper, and magazine articles, viewings of film and video presentations, and weekly compositions and other writing assignments. In order to achieve competence in Italian, students should plan to take 201 and 202 in sequence.
2901 ITAL-202-01 Inter Ital II:Comp & Lit 1.00 LEC Del Puppo, Dario MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM SH - T302 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 201 or equivalent.
  The review of grammar begun in Italian 201 will be completed in this course. Students’ oral and writing skills will be enhanced by further exploration of aspects of Italian culture, through a variety of texts and media. While emphasizing students’ communication skills, this course aims to provide them with the basis for linguistic competence in Italian.
2678 ITAL-272-01 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - S205 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-272-01, FORG-272-01
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
2058 ITAL-274-01 Food in Ital His Soc Art 1.00 LEC Del Puppo, Dario MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 137 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-274-01
  The saying, “A tavola non s’invecchia” (“One does not age at the supper table”), expresses the importance of food and eating for Italians. In this course, we will examine the relationship between food and culture in Italy, from the Romans to the present, through a variety of readings and tasting experiences. Topics include: the importing and exporting of different foods in antiquity as an instance of cultural and economic exchange; medieval beliefs about intellectual and physical aptitudes associated with diet; the representation of food in art, literature, and cinema; regional cuisines and cultural identities; and the language of food. We will also discuss Italian and Italian-American cuisine as the reflection of related, yet very different, cultures. (Listed as both LACS 274 and ITAL 274.)
2642 ITAL-276-01 Zombie Fascism(s) 0.50 SEM King, Joshua W: 6:30PM-9:00PM SH - T302 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-276-01
  How do contemporary neo-fascist and anti-fascist movements in Europe and North America draw on the original fascist project for their ideology, culture, propaganda, and organizational principles? In what ways do contemporary "fascist" movements differ from the historic ones from which they draw inspiration? To what extent does it make sense use the designation "fascist" to describe these groups? In this colloquium, we will continue the conversation begun in LACS 275 (Italian Fascism and Anti-Fascism) by interrogating the ideologies of these contemporary movements, as well as the resistance to them, in light of historical European fascism and anti-fascism.
2467 ITAL-277-01 Wmn, Italy & the Mediterranean 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N128 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: LACS-277-01
  This course examines the cultural, political, and social identity of women in contemporary Italy as represented in literature and in film. Italy is also a country of mass migration and, therefore, many recent migrant women from the Mediterranean region are also writing about their experience and about life in Italy. Topics include: Women writers as active agents of social and political change in patriarchal Italy, the clash of cultural identities and roles, and the impact of post-colonial theory and practice on gender in Italy. Authors and filmmakers include Ribka Sibhatu, Randa Ghazy, Gabriella Ghermandi and Cristina Ali Farah
2054 ITAL-290-01 Italian Cinema 1.00 LEC King, Joshua TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: LACS-290-01
  A study and discussion of Italian cinema from neorealism to the present. The course will cover both formal and thematic trends in the films of the noted postwar Italian directors Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, and Luchino Visconti. The course will also consider the trend away from reliance on literary texts toward the development of personal expressions by such author/directors as Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Lina Wertmüller, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Maurizio Nichetti, and others. Film screenings will be in Italian with English subtitles. Lectures and coursework will be in English. Students wishing to apply this course toward the major in Italian must secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. Faithful attendance is required. (Listed as both LACS 290 and ITAL 290.)
1442 ITAL-314-01 Contemporary Italian Lit 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LIB - 119 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A critical reading of selected novels, short stories, poetry, and plays from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Authors include: Pirandello, Svevo, Aleramo, Montale, Ungaretti, Morante, Calvino, Petrignani, Fo, and other contemporary authors. Emphasis is on the historical and cultural context of the works and on recent trends in Italian literature. Topics include: literature during both world wars and under Fascism, modernism and postmodernism in literature, contemporary women writers, and the role of Italian intellectuals in society. All work is done in Italian.
2468 ITAL-335-01 Dante: The Divine Comedy 1.00 LEC Del Puppo, Dario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - T308 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: LACS-335-01
  An intensive study of the Divine Comedy (in translation) with particular emphasis on the historical and aesthetic significance of this 'summa.' Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Italian should receive permission of the instructor. (Listed as both LACS 335 and ITAL 335.)
1254 ITAL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1443 ITAL-401-01 Sr Sem: Topics in Ital Studies 1.00 SEM di Florio Gula, Martina MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LIB - 119 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 228 or equivalent.
  This seminar is required of all seniors majoring in Italian: Plan A, Plan B (Italian as primary language.) An interdisciplinary seminar devoted to guided, individual research. Each student may work on any aspect of the history, society, or culture of Italy or of Italians in other lands. Coursework is conducted in Italian. The grade is based on seminar participation and a research project. Prerequisites: At least one 300-level course in Italian literature or equivalent and permission of the instructor.
1252 ITAL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1070 JAPN-102-01 Intens Elem Japanese II 1.50 LEC Izumi, Katsuya MWF: 9:00AM-9:45AM
TR: 8:25AM-9:10AM
MC - 311 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Japanese 101, with increased emphasis on conversational practice. An additional 120 characters will be learned. Students are expected to master most of the spoken patterns by the end of the semester. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
1071 JAPN-202-01 Intermediate Japanese II 1.00 LEC Izumi, Katsuya MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MC - 309 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  Prerequisite: Japanese 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Japanese 201, with further emphasis on written and spoken development of the current idiom. Three hours of class work. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
2180 JAPN-236-01 Japanese Crime Lit & Film 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - 106 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: LACS-236-01, INTS-236-01
  This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
1253 JAPN-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2638 JAPN-401-01 Senior Seminar 1.00 SEM Izumi, Katsuya TBA TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar is required of all seniors majoring in Japanese: Plan B (Japanese as primary language). Over the term, students will work collaboratively on the various papers they are writing by way of integrating exercises in their major, and the whole class will undertake a number of readings in common in order to provide informed criticism of one another’s papers. Depending on enrollment, the class may also spend part of the semester considering a special topic, author, or genre in Japanese studies.
1262 JAPN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2051 LING-101-01 Introduction to Linguistics 1.00 LEC Lahti, Katherine MF: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - S201 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH
  A general introduction to the study of language. First we will study the fundamental components of language (sounds, words, sentences). We will then examine the crucial question of how words and sentences manage to mean anything. The latter part of the course will be devoted to theoretical approaches to the nature of language, to how and why languages change over time, and to the ways language determines and reflects the structures of society.
2972 LING-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1567 PORT-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Hubert, Rosario MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - T302 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: HISP-223-01
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
1148 RUSS-102-01 Elementary Russian II 1.00 LEC Lahti, Katherine MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM LIB - 174 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with RUSSSTUD
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 101 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Russian 101. Students increase their speaking, reading and writing ability through vocabulary building and learning further grammar structures. This class meets three hours a week and carries one credit.
2474 RUSS-304-01 Current Russian Media 1.00 LEC Lahti, Katherine MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM LIB - 119 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with RUSSSTUD
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 201 or equivalent.
  A survey of current Russian newspaper and magazine articles, radio and television broadcasts, and the Internet. Subjects covered will include popular culture, home and family life, environmental issues, economics, and politics. Students will strive to master the special type of Russian used in the media as well as describe how these media reflect or distort the state of Russian society. Prerequisite: Russian 222 or permission of the instructor. (This course is also offered under the Russian and Eurasian Studies program.)