blank
Select a level:
Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.
blank

Course Listing for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2160 INTS-211-01 Global Intimacies 1.00 LEC Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS Cross-listing: WMGS-211-01
  What is globalization? A process of homogenization and Americanization? Where does globalization happen? In the economic realm that we usually associate with the public? In contrast to these conceptualizations, this course explores diverse and contingent processes of globalization in the domestic and private spheres. Specifically, we will look at how global mobilities trouble and complicate intimate relations such as marriage, love, sex, reproduction, family making, and self-identity across culture.
2449 INTS-235-01 Youth Culture - Muslim World 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, EDUC, MIDDLEAST
  Youth Culture in the Muslim World examines the dynamic world of Muslim youth and the personal, social, and political impact of "coming of age" in a variety of Muslim communities from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa to the Americas. Topics include theories of youth culture, intergenerational conflicts around marriage, gender and sexuality, the re-negotiation of religion and morality, the challenge of accessing education and employment, the globalization of youth cultures, and the often 'revolutionary' struggles over political participation, as conveyed through music, ethnographic texts, fashion, personal memoirs, documentaries, and social media platforms.
2178 INTS-236-01 Japanese Crime Lit & Film 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, FILM Cross-listing: JAPN-236-01, LACS-236-01
  This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
2412 INTS-241-01 Pol & Rev in LatAm/Carib Hist 1.00 LEC Pinto-Handler, Sergio TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  This class examines popular politics, insurgency, and revolution in colonial and modern Latin America and the Caribbean. It focuses on the historical role of slaves, peasants, popular intellectuals, and workers from indigenous, African-American, and ethnically mixed backgrounds in their relations with elites and the state in different regional contexts. We will read landmark texts and primary sources on indigenous insurgencies in the central Andean region in the 1780s, the Haitian Revolution, the revolutions of independence in Spanish America, the Mexican Revolution, and other topics that illustrate the evolution of the historiography of this field.
2450 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet W: 1:15PM-3:50PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, CLIC, EDUC, GLBLSTD, PBPL, WMGS
  This course examines the legal, social, political, and religious dimensions of citizenship and belonging with a focus on immigrants and refugees resettling in the United States (and Hartford, in particular). Using ethnographic case studies as well as autobiographical, historical, policy, social media, filmic and literary materials, students will explore topics like American immigration history and law, theories of transnational migration and social inclusion, debates about immigration reform and integration policies, and concepts like superdiversity, cosmopolitanism, and mobility justice in understanding contemporary migration, as it is shaped by forces of nativism, political upheaval, environmental devastation and the global economy. Course typically includes a community learning component.
2148 INTS-256-01 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Pinto-Handler, Sergio TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, LATINAMER Cross-listing: HIST-256-01
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
2745 INTS-256-02 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Euraque, Dario TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, LATINAMER Cross-listing: HIST-256-02
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
2451 INTS-307-01 Womxn's Rights as Human Rights 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, GLBLSTDS, HRST, WMGS
  This course explores the gendering of human rights and struggles to achieve rights based on gender and sexual identity across cultures. In doing so we will interrogate the meaning of human security, self-determination, and the international (UN-centered) human rights regime--through topics like rights to bodily integrity and reproductive rights (including genital surgeries), rights to protection against sexual abuse and gender/gender-identity violence (transgender rights; human trafficking); economic, environmental, and property rights; the cultural and social life of rights, mobility rights (immigrants and refugees), and individual and group rights vis a vis the state. Students will make use of materials like formal legal and human rights documents and ethnographic, and cultural materials such as case studies, novels, films, personal testimonies, religious rituals, and forms of oral and musical expression.
2477 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, GLBLSTD, HIST, HRST
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
2516 INTS-328-01 Gender, Race and Gbl Pop Cult 1.00 SEM Gomes, Daniela TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course intends to debate the reproduction of sexist and patriarchist content by the cultural industry on a global scale, as well as mediatic representation of Women of Color in the U.S. and the Global South. Approaching television productions such as reality shows, soap operas and telenovelas, students will participate in conversations around themes such as race, nationality, gender, and sexuality. It additionally opens space to explore commonalities presented by feminist resistance globally and to explore the importance of non-linear communication systems when facilitating the dialogue between minority groups in different parts of the world.
2414 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Gomes, Daniela TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
2524 INTS-347-01 The End of Slavery 1.00 SEM Pinto-Handler, Sergio M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS
  For most of human history, slavery was a normal practice in almost every corner of the world. Yet we now think of slavery as an intolerable evil and recoil at the idea that it might exist anywhere. This course examines this shift by tracing the global destruction of slavery from the Haitian Revolution in the eighteenth-century to present-day campaigns against human trafficking. We will ask how people came to view slavery as a barrier to human progress, assess whether the institution was ever truly destroyed, and try to understand why the legacies of slavery endure.
2753 INTS-352-01 Comparative Political Economy 1.00 SEM Fernandez Milmanda, Belen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: POLS-352-01
  This course provides a survey of the field of comparative political economy broadly defined as the comparative study of the interrelationships between politics and economics. We will review the main classic and contemporary debates in the discipline. Topics include: the relationship between political institutions and economic development, inequality and political stability, interest groups, welfare states, varieties of capitalism, the politics of taxation and international trade, and market reforms. We will look at both developed and developing countries, with an emphasis on understanding why they choose (or end up with) the policies and institutions that they have, even when in some cases these policies and institutions might hamper development.
2608 INTS-360-01 GEO DESIRE 1.00 SEM Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: WMGS-360-01
  This course examines gender, erotic desire, and sexuality via the critical lens of space, place, and mobilities. Starting from foundational texts that initiated academic conversation on sexuality and urban geography, this course will explore the ways in which gendered bodies and erotic desires shape and are shaped by spaces and places that are simultaneously infused with meanings of race, ethnicity, class, modernity, (trans)nationality, (post)coloniality, neoliberal capitalism and so on. Readings are drawn from a variety of disciplines that may include feminist and queer studies, geography, urban studies, and anthropology.
1285 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1391 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Fernandez Milmanda, Belen TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
1394 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2204 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis. This course will be graded as Pass/Fail.
1147 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert, Michelle R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, ANTH, INTS
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
2614 AMST-496-01 US Empire Asia/PacificWars 1.00 SEM Nebolon, Juliet W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: AMST-896-01
  U.S. military involvement in Asia and the Pacific Islands has impacted the experiences of Asian and Pacific Islander communities and their diaspora since the late nineteenth century. In this seminar, students study the history of the Asia/Pacific wars and investigate the consequences of U.S. militarism, empire, and settler colonialism in Asia and the Pacific Islands via individual research projects. Together we will examine historical narratives, government documents, and cultural texts (films, literature, musicals) to understand how U.S. wars in the Asia/Pacific region have informed notions of race, indigeneity, gender, and empire both at home and abroad. The course brings together scholarship from the fields of American Studies, Asian American Studies, Pacific Indigenous Studies, and East Asian Studies.
2494 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Beebe, Rebecca M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2338 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar, Beth MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2530 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro, Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1529 ANTH-207-01 Anth Persp Women & Gender 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, INTS, LATINAMER, WMGS
  Using texts and films, this course will explore the nature of women’s lives in both the contemporary United States and a number of radically different societies around the world, including, for example, the !Kung San people of the Kalahari and the Mundurucù of Amazonian Brazil. As they examine the place of women in these societies, students will also be introduced to theoretical perspectives that help explain both variations in women’s status from society to society and "universal" aspects of their status.
2454 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC Trostle, James TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, INTS
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
2455 ANTH-310-01 Anth of Development 1.00 SEM Hussain, Shafqat TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, INTS
  This seminar will explore international economic and social development from an anthropological perspective. We will critically examine concepts of development, underdevelopment, and progress. We will compare how multilateral lenders and small nongovernmental organizations employ development rhetoric and methods. We will examine specific case studies of development projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, asking what has been attained, and what is attainable.
2548 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Wang, Jui-Chien MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
1319 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
1447 HISP-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Hubert, Rosario MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: PORT-223-01
  Prerequisite: the equivalent of two semesters of study of any Romance Language (Spanish, French, Italian, Catalan)
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
2565 HISP-307-01 Modern Spain and Italy 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
  Italy has existed as a nation-state for slightly less than 150 years. For many more years than this, however, the territory it currently occupies was divided into numerous principalities. For more than four centuries starting in in the early 1300s, a number of the more important of these principalities were controlled by monarchies located in today’s Spain. In this course, we will analyze the rich history of Hispanic-Italian coexistence, endeavoring first to discern some of the reasons why this important history is not better known, then examining the many channels of "cultural commerce" between the peoples of the Iberian and Italian Peninsulas in the early modern and contemporary periods, as well as in the context of today in today’s united Europe.
2537 HIST-204-01 Central Am. Immigration to US 1.00 LEC Euraque, Dario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  This course will survey the history of immigration patterns from the five countries of Central America to the U.S. between the early 19th century and the current decade in the context of Latin American history. The countries that will be surveyed are: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. The methodological emphasis in the lectures will be comparative.
2443 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: URST-215-01
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.
2444 HIST-238-01 Caribbean History 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, LATINAMER
  The location of the first encounter, conquest, and colonization of Native American peoples by Europeans, the Caribbean became a center of bitter rivalries between European imperial powers, and later in the 20th century a new, premiere location of the United States’ own imperial thrust. The Caribbean’s strategic location in relation to Atlantic Ocean trade routes and its tropical climate and fertile soils were key factors in shaping these imperial rivalries and the colonial and postcolonial societies that emerged in the region. The vast experience of African slavery, the later “indentured” migration of hundreds of thousands of Asians to some colonies, and the migration of similar numbers of Europeans (especially to the Hispanic Caribbean) have shaped deeply yet unevenly the nature of Caribbean societies since the 16th century, giving the Caribbean a complex multi-ethnic, yet also heavily “Western,” cultural landscape. This course will introduce students to these and other aspects of Caribbean history, from the pre-European era, through the epics of the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) and the Cuban Revolution of 1959, to the present.
2400 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
2553 HIST-301-01 Biography as History 1.00 SEM Euraque, Dario M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  This seminar deals with the theory, methodology and historiography of  historical biography. We begin with varied readings on the theory, method and historiography of biography, and then  transition to deep, critical analysis of substantial classic and contemporary biographies about personae who lived and died in different parts of the world. Students read biographies of political greats, revolutionaries, mystics, artists, poets, musicians and more. No expertise in historical analysis required, or any perquisite history courses. Students enrolled must love to read substantial books, and analyze them.
2407 HIST-332-01 South Africa/Anti-Apartheid Mv 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  The creation of the apartheid state in South Africa gave birth to a litany of sociopolitical movements aimed at dismantling a system of white minority rule. In what ways can a digital archive open up a window onto this rich and dynamic history of the anti-antiapartheid movement in South Africa between 1948 and 1994? This course will seek to answer this question by primarily utilizing Aluka's "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa", a collection of over 190,000 primary and secondary sources that shed considerable light on how marginalized peoples and communities sought to realize a democratic alternative to settler colonialism during the era of decolonization in Africa. Topics such as political leadership, nonviolent civil disobedience, coalition building, state repression, armed guerilla resistance, nationalism, international solidarity and truth and reconciliation will inform the ways in which we search for sources of historical evidence contained in Aluka's digital archive.
2409 HIST-362-01 The Samurai Warrior in History 1.00 SEM Bayliss, Jeffrey TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, GLBLSTDS, INTS
  The samurai were as important for Japan’s historical and cultural transformation as they are misunderstood. This course aims at separating the myth from the reality of the samurai by examining the history of Japanese warriors and the culture they created, from their lowly origins in antiquity through their rise to hegemony during the 13th through 18th centuries, to their eventual disappearance as a distinct class in the 19th century. We will also examine the evolving image of the samurai warrior and his supposedly rigid moral code of conduct, as it appears in literature and film, from some of the earliest appearances of such images right up to today. Our purpose in examining these images of the samurai is not only to distinguish myth from reality, but also to explore the political purposes such images have been put to in legitimating samurai rule prior to the 20th century, and in informing Japanese views of themselves and non-Japanese views of Japan in the years since.
2599 HIST-392-01 Chinese Hist thru literature 1.00 SEM Alejandrino, Clark TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  We often think of history as a discipline that separates fact from fiction. But the blurry line that separates literary imagination from historical realities is filled with bridges that allow us to traverse both worlds. In its long history, China has produced a vast literature ripe for historical exploration. In this course, we will critically read novels, short stories, poetry, and other works of literature as a prism into the historical world of the authors and the readers. In doing so, this course demonstrates how literature may enrich and even change how we interpret Chinese history. Depending on the instructor, each semester this course is offered will focus on particular themes, topics, and/or time periods in Chinese history.
1546 JWST-219-01 Israeli Film & Visual Media 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal T: 6:30PM-9:15PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM, INTS
  Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
1989 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
1990 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
2297 POLS-256-01 Comparative Political Analysis 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for first year students, 13 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This survey course in comparative political analysis will examine the various ways government and social actors interact as both collaborators and competitors in the exercise of power and authority. The course will focus on four broad themes: (1) societal and institutional foundations of effective governance within democratic states; (2) statebuilding and the causes of global variation in the strength of states, with a focus on the legacy of colonialism; (3) the causes of rebellions and civil wars and the factors that explain patterns of violence within societies in conflict; (4) nationalism and ethnic politics and why some countries are able to achieve social cohesion and unity, while others fragment along ethnic and racial lines This methodologically focused course will provide the theoretical and analytical foundations for upper-level courses in comparative politics.
2300 POLS-320-01 End of Democratic Hegemony? 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, HRST, INTS
  NOTE: This course is a sophomore/Junior Seminar
  NOTE: Counts toward distribution requirement for GBL5
  Is the era of democratic hegemony coming to an end? This seminar will address this question in two parts. First, we will explore whether the U.S. democratic system is in crisis, and evaluate the extent to which America can, and will, continue to be a force for maintaining and spreading democracy across the globe. Second, we will examine the rise of China and what this means for the future of democracy. Will China eventually democratize, similar to how other East Asian countries did when they reached a certain level of economic development? Or does China offer a viable nondemocratic model for a peaceful and prosperous polity, thus challenging the liberal-democratic model as the only conceivable long-term vision of modernity?
2304 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, PBPL
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.
1998 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert, Andrew W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
1567 PORT-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Hubert, Rosario MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: HISP-223-01
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
1469 THDN-220-01 Kathak: Philosophy & Practice 1.00 STU Agrawal, Rachna MW: 4:00PM-5:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS, INTS
  This course emphasizes the practice, theory, and philosophy of Kathak, a classical dance of India, which originated over 2,000 years ago. Evolving from a blend of Middle Eastern dance styles and ancient Indian storytelling art form, Kathak combines dance, drama, and music to convey ideas and emotions. Modern Kathak emphasizes geometric patterns and design with special emphasis on footwork, pirouettes and intricate rhythms. The course covers specific techniques as well as the cultural context from which they evolved. The course also includes analyses of philosophical, economic, political, and gender issues that facilitated the development of Kathak. Also listed under international studies/Asian studies.
1537 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Gamble, Julie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.
2635 URST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: HIST-215-01
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.