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Course Listing for CLASSICAL STUDIES - Spring 2020 (ALL: 01/21/2020 - 05/08/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1237 CLAS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1464 CLAS-402-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  A continuation of Classics 401 for students pursuing honors in the Classics major. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the chair are required.
1238 CLAS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
2357 CLCV-214-01 Greek and Roman Architecture 1.00 LEC Risser, Martha MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - N128 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ARTHISTORY
  An examination of building materials and methods used in the construction of domestic, civic, and religious buildings of the Greek and Roman worlds. The way in which the functions of these buildings influenced their forms is also examined. Further topics of discussion include comparative studies of the works of individual architects, architectural adaptations to local topography, and the use of building programs for propaganda purposes.
2358 CLCV-232-01 Ancient Greece on Film and TV 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - N217 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with FILM, WMGS
  What do films and television programs set in ancient Greece say about us and our identities now? This course explores the relationship modern artists have constructed with ancient Greece in the cinema and on the television screen. The main focus will be on how contemporary Americans view, depict, and change ancient experiences based on differing circumstances of time and place. Topics for discussion include the distinction between “myth” and “history”, the depiction of gender, the representation of the divine, considerations of the audience, and the mechanics of adaptation. Films may include Disney’s Hercules (1997), O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), Troy (2004), and 300 (2007). Television programs may include Xena: Warrior Princess (1995-2001) and Wishbone (1995-1999).
2431 CLCV-250-01 The Trojan Wars 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM CT - 210 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: GREK-350-01
  In this course we'll discuss ancient and modern versions of the Trojan War, starting point with the massively influential heroic epic by Homer, the Iliad. We'll then discuss other ancient versions that resonate with the Iliad, such as Quintus of Smyrna's Greek epic Posthomerica, Virgil's Roman epic Aeneid, the satirical poem Battle of Frogs and Mice, and Euripides' play Helen. We'll also discuss versions of the war created by modern artists, such as Wolfgang Petersen's film Troy and the miniseries Troy: Fall of a City. This course is taught in English and readings are in English for students taking CLCV 250. Students taking this course as GREK 350 will read selections from course texts in Greek.
2266 CLCV-308-01 Archaeology of Greek Religion 1.00 SEM Risser, Martha TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N128 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ARTHISTORY, RELG
  This course examines the material evidence for ancient Greek religion, cults, and rituals; methods of approaching ancient religion and analyzing cult practices through art, architecture, and artifacts; exploration of votive, sacrificial, and feasting practices; distinctions between sacred and civic space in ancient Greece; differences between urban, extra-urban, rural, and panhellenic sanctuaries; the role of the city in establishing, maintaining, and supporting religious places and practices. There are no pre-requisites for this course.
2514 CLCV-309-01 Conspiracies in Ancient Rome 1.00 SEM Risser, Martha TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM HHN - 105 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: LATN-309-01
  Conspiracies are pervasive in Roman histories, biographies, and speeches. Ancient writers developed a rhetoric of conspiracy so effective that it remains a way we communicate in the modern world. In this course, we examine some specific accusations of conspiracy; their historical and sociocultural contexts; rhetorical tropes used in conspiracy narratives to polarize an audience; and the alleged roles of women and slaves in plots concerning the property, careers, and lives of prominent men. Students hone their own rhetoric by playing the "Crisis of Catiline" game in the Reacting to the Past series. Those taking this class as LATN 309 read selections from course texts in Latin.
2557 CLCV-330-01 Vergil's Aeneid 1.00 SEM Safran, Meredith W: 6:30PM-9:00PM AAC - 231 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with LACS, WMGS
  A cornerstone of historical-cultural identity in classical antiquity and modern Western successors to the Roman Empire, Vergil’s Aeneid recounts how the warrior Aeneas and survivors of the Trojan War endured the hardships of exile to reach their prophesied home in Italy, founding the dynasty of Augustus, the first emperor of Rome who ruled in Vergil’s time. Long read as a triumphalist celebration of imperial dominance, in recent decades the Aeneid has also been recognized as giving voice to the sorrow generated by Rome’s recent civil wars and the discarding of women and their concerns in establishing empire. This course explores why, for millennia, the artistic, cultural, and political power of the Aeneid have earned it praise and critique, both at Rome and beyond.
1031 CLCV-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Risser, Martha TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1490 GREK-101-01 Intro Class & Biblical Greek I 1.50 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MWF: 1:15PM-2:30PM LIB - 174 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  A course in the fundamentals of classical Greek, designed for those who begin the language in college.
2513 GREK-350-01 The Trojan Wars 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM CT - 210 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: CLCV-250-01
  In this course we'll discuss ancient and modern versions of the Trojan War, starting point with the massively influential heroic epic by Homer, the Iliad. We'll then discuss other ancient versions that resonate with the Iliad, such as Quintus of Smyrna's Greek epic Posthomerica, Virgil's Roman epic Aeneid, the satirical poem Battle of Frogs and Mice, and Euripides' play Helen. We'll also discuss versions of the war created by modern artists, such as Wolfgang Petersen's film Troy and the miniseries Troy: Fall of a City. This course is taught in English and readings are in English for students taking CLCV 250. Students taking this course as GREK 350 will read selections from course texts in Greek.
2643 HIST-115-01 Hist of the Greek World:c.1500 1.00 LEC Reger, Gary MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N130 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSICS
  This course covers the history of the Greek world—Greece, the Aegean islands, western Asia Minor, the Black Sea, and southern Italy and Sicily—in the period between the end of the Bronze Age and the arrival of the Romans (c. 1500-200 BCE). The emergence of the polis, the Greek city-state, as the predominant way to organize political, social, economic, religious, and cultural life, and the spread of these institutions, form the central foci of the course. There will be emphasis on the reading and interpretation of primary source material through lectures, discussions, and analytical writing.
2405 HIST-314-01 Rome and the Desert 1.00 SEM Reger, Gary MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - T121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSCIVIL
  With the defeat of the Carthaginians in 202 BCE, the Romans first encountered the desert world of North Africa. For the next several centuries, Roman presence expanded through the northern Sahara, Egypt, and the Middle East. The desert world presented a climate and cultures very different from those the Romans had been accustomed to in Italy. In this course we will explore some of the ways the Romans reacted to and interacted with the desert world, using a rich body of primary source material and archaeological remains that the desert climate helped preserve.
1075 LATN-102-01 Intermed Grammar Reading Latin 1.50 LEC Safran, Meredith MWF: 11:30AM-12:45PM LSC - 135 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 101; or equivalent score on the Latin placement exam as determined by the Classics Department; or permission of the instructor
  This course begins with a brief review of material covered in LAT101, then proceeds to cover complex subordinate clauses involving the subjunctive, indirect statement, and varieties of participial constructions, in addition to further vocabulary acquisition. Students begin to read passages from ancient Latin literature, such as Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars, Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, the Res Gestae of Augustus Caesar, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
2630 LATN-105-01 Latin in the Community 0.25 LAB Safran, Meredith F: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - T408  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: one semester of Latin at Trinity or one year of Latin elsewhere (e.g. in high school)
  Students will learn a curriculum designed for middle-schoolers (e.g. Aequora: Teaching Literacy with Latin) and read articles on Classics and community outreach to work with local schools (e.g. HMTCA) to support their Latin Club. This "lab" culminates in a final project (e.g. research poster or paper). Student who have taken at least one semester at Trinity are automatically eligible; students with at least one year of Latin elsewhere are eligible, with instructor's approval.
2515 LATN-309-01 Conspiracies in Ancient Rome 1.00 SEM Risser, Martha TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM HHN - 105 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: CLCV-309-01
  Conspiracies are pervasive in Roman histories, biographies, and speeches. Ancient writers developed a rhetoric of conspiracy so effective that it remains a way we communicate in the modern world. In this course, we examine some specific accusations of conspiracy; their historical and sociocultural contexts; rhetorical tropes used in conspiracy narratives to polarize an audience; and the alleged roles of women and slaves in plots concerning the property, careers, and lives of prominent men. Students hone their own rhetoric by playing the "Crisis of Catiline" game in the Reacting to the Past series. Those taking this class as LATN 309 read selections from course texts in Latin.
1483 RELG-212-01 New Testament 1.00 LEC Hornung, Gabriel MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MECC - 232 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSICS
  An examination of the New Testament in the context of the first century C.E. to study the formation and themes of these early Christian writings. The course will stress the analysis of texts and discussion of their possible interpretations. How did the earliest writings about Jesus present him? Who was Paul? Is it more accurate to call him the founder of Christianity instead of Jesus? How do we understand Gospels that are not in the New Testament? We will attend to these and other social, political, and historical issues for studying the New Testament and Early Christianity.
2360 RELG-231-01 Christianity in the Making 1.00 LEC Jones, Tamsin TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM CT - 105 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSICS, HIST
  This course will examine the philosophical, cultural, religious and political contexts out of which Christianity emerged from the time of Jesus through the 5th century. Emphasis will be placed on the complexity and diversity of early Christian movements, as well as the process that occurred to establish Christianity as a religion that would dominate the Roman Empire. Topics to be covered will include the writings of the New Testament, Gnostics, martyrdom, desert monasticism and asceticism, the construction of orthodoxy and heresy, women in the early Church, the formation of the biblical canon, and the identity and role of Jesus of Nazareth.