Course Schedule

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Fall 2020 (ALL: 09/07/2020 - 12/21/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3702 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 18 seats reserved for first-year students.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
1375 AMST-203-90 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
3288 AMST-209-01 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-209-90, AMST-209-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3712 AMST-209-90 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-209-90, HIST-209-01
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3716 AMST-253-01 American Conscience 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGL-253-01
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 10 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Conscience can be the inner voice of an individual; it can also be the shared voice of a society's commitment to certain norms--sometimes the same norms an individual feels driven by conscience to defy. Questions of conscience therefore involve central issues of literary study: How does individual expression interact with cultural context? How is content (what is moral?) mediated and modulated by the form of its representation (what is "my conscience" telling me?). This course explores key episodes in US history when authors and activists--from Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry David Thoreau to Ida B. Wells and Martin Luther King--have mobilized the written word to awaken readers' consciences or reshape a collective conscience.
3363 AMST-265-90 Thinking with Things 1.00 LEC Guzman, Amanda MW: 3:55PM-5:10PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ANTH-265-90
  Our relationship to and interaction with things is a defining feature of the human experience. To think with things is to use objects as the primary lens of analysis. This course explores a range of object case-studies and the unique questions they present for understanding American history and contemporary society. The course centers on close-looking or building interpretations from direct material observation. Students work hands-on with objects spanning from historical texts to folk art and souvenir material to contemporary art and digital media. Object case-studies draw from diverse representations including cultural heritage debates in museums and portrayals of cultural identity performance in popular media. Students will learn to critically examine and discuss the many materials that make up our world.
3228 AMST-284-90 Food and American Culture 1.00 LEC Miller, Karen M: 6:15PM-8:45PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  What we eat and how we eat reflect more than basic physical needs, and food has long played influential roles in defining and representing American culture, identities, and nationalism. Our course will begin by examining the history of the Thanksgiving feast and conclude with contemporary movements in organic and farm-to-table eating. As we explore foods' implications for Americanism, gender, class, and age, our topics of study will include defining edibles and non-edibles, immigrant influences, food and technology, American farming, diet fads, school lunches and gardens, hunger in America and food regulations. Our class will work with the nearby Billings Forge community to learn more about food's roles in family life and social reforms, including urban renewal.
3664 AMST-324-90 From Civil Rights to #BLM 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl R: 2:00PM-4:40PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, MNOR Cross-listing: HIST-324-90
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  Have we entered a new civil rights era? What are this new movement's goals? Who are these new activists and what political beliefs motivate them? How did we get here? This seminar tries to answer these questions by looking backward. Both the strategies and the political analyses of the Movement for Black Lives are rooted in the successes - and failures - of the civil rights movements of the past. We will study the twentieth century's "Long Civil Rights Movement" and consider both continuities and breaks between past and present struggles for racial justice.
3168 AMST-331-01 Lit of Native New England 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGL-331-01
  Before it was New England, this was Native space. From the Wampanoags to the Mohegans, Narragansetts and Pequots, diverse Algonquian communities imbued their physical space with their own histories, traditions, and literatures. With the arrival of English settlers, Native Americans became active participants in a world deeply invested in writing and written traditions, and they marked their presence through English colonial written forms while maintaining a longstanding commitment to their own communities and lifeways. In this course we will explore the great variety of writing by and about Native Americans in this region: we will look at the long tradition of Native American literary presence in New England, from English language texts to other forms of cultural expression. The course is research intensive. Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
2782 AMST-336-90 U.S. Colonialism 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: INTS-335-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for AMST majors.
  What does it mean to study the United States in the world, and the world in the United States? This course considers the role of the United States within global relations of empire, capitalism, migration, and war. It also examines how U.S. domestic politics of race, gender, national identity, and social justice have evolved in relation to these transnational histories. We will explore how the existence of the U.S. nation-state is premised upon the global histories of European colonialism, indigenous displacement, and transatlantic slavery. We will analyze the cultures and consequences of U.S. empire, as well as the multiracial and transnational social movements that have contested U.S expansion. This interdisciplinary course combines historical, literary, visual, and theoretical texts.
3229 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
1446 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3230 AMST-405-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:15PM-8:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-805-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3391 AMST-450-90 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl T: 2:00PM-4:40PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-850-90, HIST-350-90
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
1481 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1579 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1447 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1865 AMST-801-01 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven R: 6:15PM-8:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This seminar, which is required of all American Studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor. This course meets the Spatial methods requirement.
3231 AMST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:15PM-8:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-405-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3396 AMST-850-90 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl T: 2:00PM-4:40PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-450-90, HIST-350-90
  This course is open only to History and American Studies majors, or permission of instructor.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
3258 AMST-868-90 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel W: 6:15PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGL-868-90, ENGL-468-90
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets -- not all of them American -- who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 468-06 and English 868-16 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
1610 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1473 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1469 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1470 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1472 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1471 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3102 PHIL-241-01 Race Racism & Phil 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  An intensive examination of some philosophical discussions of race and racism. Topics include the origins of European racism, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic racism, the conceptual connections between racist thinking and certain canonized philosophical positions (e.g., Locke’s nominalism), the relationship between racism and our notions of personal identity, the use of traditional philosophical thought (e.g., the history of philosophy) to characterize and explain differences between European and black African cultures, the possible connections between racism and Pan-Africanism, the nature of anti-Semitism, and recent attempts to conceptualize race and racism as social constructions.