Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - Fall 2020 (ALL: 09/07/2020 - 12/21/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3702 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM ADMIS - 301 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 18 seats reserved for first-year students.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
1375 AMST-203-90 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
3288 AMST-209-01 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM SH - N128 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-209-90, AMST-209-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3712 AMST-209-90 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-209-90, HIST-209-01
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3716 AMST-253-01 American Conscience 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM MH - 203 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGL-253-01
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 10 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Conscience can be the inner voice of an individual; it can also be the shared voice of a society's commitment to certain norms--sometimes the same norms an individual feels driven by conscience to defy. Questions of conscience therefore involve central issues of literary study: How does individual expression interact with cultural context? How is content (what is moral?) mediated and modulated by the form of its representation (what is "my conscience" telling me?). This course explores key episodes in US history when authors and activists--from Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry David Thoreau to Ida B. Wells and Martin Luther King--have mobilized the written word to awaken readers' consciences or reshape a collective conscience.
3363 AMST-265-90 Thinking with Things 1.00 LEC Guzman, Amanda MW: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ANTH-265-90
  Our relationship to and interaction with things is a defining feature of the human experience. To think with things is to use objects as the primary lens of analysis. This course explores a range of object case-studies and the unique questions they present for understanding American history and contemporary society. The course centers on close-looking or building interpretations from direct material observation. Students work hands-on with objects spanning from historical texts to folk art and souvenir material to contemporary art and digital media. Object case-studies draw from diverse representations including cultural heritage debates in museums and portrayals of cultural identity performance in popular media. Students will learn to critically examine and discuss the many materials that make up our world.
3228 AMST-284-90 Food and American Culture 1.00 LEC Miller, Karen M: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  What we eat and how we eat reflect more than basic physical needs, and food has long played influential roles in defining and representing American culture, identities, and nationalism. Our course will begin by examining the history of the Thanksgiving feast and conclude with contemporary movements in organic and farm-to-table eating. As we explore foods' implications for Americanism, gender, class, and age, our topics of study will include defining edibles and non-edibles, immigrant influences, food and technology, American farming, diet fads, school lunches and gardens, hunger in America and food regulations. Our class will work with the nearby Billings Forge community to learn more about food's roles in family life and social reforms, including urban renewal.
3664 AMST-324-90 From Civil Rights to #BLM 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl R: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, MNOR Cross-listing: HIST-324-90
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  Have we entered a new civil rights era? What are this new movement's goals? Who are these new activists and what political beliefs motivate them? How did we get here? This seminar tries to answer these questions by looking backward. Both the strategies and the political analyses of the Movement for Black Lives are rooted in the successes - and failures - of the civil rights movements of the past. We will study the twentieth century's "Long Civil Rights Movement" and consider both continuities and breaks between past and present struggles for racial justice.
3168 AMST-331-01 Lit of Native New England 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM SH - N128 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGL-331-01
  Before it was New England, this was Native space. From the Wampanoags to the Mohegans, Narragansetts and Pequots, diverse Algonquian communities imbued their physical space with their own histories, traditions, and literatures. With the arrival of English settlers, Native Americans became active participants in a world deeply invested in writing and written traditions, and they marked their presence through English colonial written forms while maintaining a longstanding commitment to their own communities and lifeways. In this course we will explore the great variety of writing by and about Native Americans in this region: we will look at the long tradition of Native American literary presence in New England, from English language texts to other forms of cultural expression. The course is research intensive. Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
2782 AMST-336-90 U.S. Colonialism 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: INTS-335-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for AMST majors.
  What does it mean to study the United States in the world, and the world in the United States? This course considers the role of the United States within global relations of empire, capitalism, migration, and war. It also examines how U.S. domestic politics of race, gender, national identity, and social justice have evolved in relation to these transnational histories. We will explore how the existence of the U.S. nation-state is premised upon the global histories of European colonialism, indigenous displacement, and transatlantic slavery. We will analyze the cultures and consequences of U.S. empire, as well as the multiracial and transnational social movements that have contested U.S expansion. This interdisciplinary course combines historical, literary, visual, and theoretical texts.
3229 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM LIB - 206 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
1446 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3230 AMST-405-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:15PM-8:45PM SH - N215 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, URST Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-805-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3391 AMST-450-90 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-850-90, HIST-350-90
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
1481 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1579 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1447 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1865 AMST-801-90 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven R: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This seminar, which is required of all American Studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor. This course meets the Spatial methods requirement.
3231 AMST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:15PM-8:45PM SH - N215 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC Cross-listing: URST-805-01, AMST-405-01
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3396 AMST-850-90 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-450-90, HIST-350-90
  This course is open only to History and American Studies majors, or permission of instructor.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
3258 AMST-868-90 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel W: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGL-868-90, ENGL-468-90
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets -- not all of them American -- who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 468-06 and English 868-16 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
1610 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1473 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1469 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1470 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1472 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1471 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3433 ANTH-101-90 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar, Beth TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 10-week remote course, ends on 11/20/2020
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3710 ANTH-101-91 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Mangan, Patricia TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  NOTE: 10-week remote course, ends on 11/20/2020
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1825 ANTH-101-92 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Conroe, Andrew TR: 7:50AM-9:05AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, URBSTDS
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3762 ANTH-101-93 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Conroe, Andrew TR: 6:15PM-7:30PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2436 ANTH-101-94 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro, Susan M: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3619 ANTH-211-90 Anthro of Infectious Diseases 1.00 LEC Trostle, James TR: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  COVID-19 is only one example of how infectious diseases can change societies. This course will examine the history, transmission, global reach, and outcomes of a range of infectious diseases including plague, cholera, influenza, measles, and COVID-19. We will learn about reproductive numbers, incidence and prevalence, and risk, but also about superspreaders, antivaxxers, and intervention designers. The anthropology of infectious diseases creates social histories: we will read novels but also ethnographic accounts of human responses to infection.
3153 ANTH-250-90 Mobility and Sustainability 1.00 SEM Notar, Beth MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  What is the relationship between mobility, community and sustainability? We will look at mobility in different cultures, ranging from hunter gathers to nomadic herders to suburban commuters. What are the characteristics of social life in cultures where people primarily walk, canoe or sail, rely on animal power, or travel in motorized vehicles? We will investigate how technological innovation, whether in the form of trains, buses, bicycles, cars or airplanes, can change people’s perceptions of both the surrounding landscape and themselves. We will also examine the kinds of infrastructure and resources needed for certain technologies of mobility, such as cars. Can we imagine motorized transport that is both environmentally and socially sustainable? Course materials will include books, articles and films. Students will conduct a mini research project related to the course. This course is not open to students who completed FYSM 179 Mobility and Sustainability.
3154 ANTH-263-90 Anthropology of Humor 1.00 LEC Conroe, Andrew TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course examines humor, satire, and parody across a broad range of cultural and historical settings. Our approach is historical and ethnographic, and rests on the idea that there exist various and diverse traditions of humor, each deeply embedded in its own social and political context. We will be exploring the ways in which specific cultural, historical, and social contexts shape how humor is created, interpreted, and responded to. At the same time, we will look at how humor can travel outside of its intended context in surprising and often-contentious ways, being revived or reinterpreted in places spatially or temporally quite distant from its context of creation.
3364 ANTH-265-90 Thinking with Things 1.00 LEC Guzman, Amanda MW: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-265-90
  Our relationship to and interaction with things is a defining feature of the human experience. To think with things is to use objects as the primary lens of analysis. This course explores a range of object case-studies and the unique questions they present for understanding American history and contemporary society. The course centers on close-looking or building interpretations from direct material observation. Students work hands-on with objects spanning from historical texts to folk art and souvenir material to contemporary art and digital media. Object case-studies draw from diverse representations including cultural heritage debates in museums and portrayals of cultural identity performance in popular media. Students will learn to critically examine and discuss the many materials that make up our world.
2717 ANTH-301-90 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Trostle, James TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
1445 ANTH-302-90 History of Anth Thought 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course explores the anthropological tradition as it has changed from the late 19th century until the present. Students will read works of the major figures in the development of the discipline, such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude Levi-Strauss. They will learn not only what these anthropologists had to say about reality, but why they said it when they did. In this sense, the course turns an anthropological eye on anthropology itself.
3434 ANTH-308-90 Anthropology of Place 1.00 SEM Nadel-Klein, Jane TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course explores the increasingly complex ways in which people in industrial and non-industrial societies locate themselves with respect to land and landscape. Contrary to some widespread assumptions regarding the fit between identity and place (i.e., ethnicity and nationalism), we study a range of settings in which people actively construct, contest, and reappropriate the spaces of modern life. Through texts, seminar discussions, films, and a field-based research project as the major exercise, students will explore a number of issues, including cultural persistence and the loss of place; the meaning of the frontier and indigenous land rights struggles; gender and public space; the deterritorialization of culture (i.e., McDonald’s in Hong Kong); and the cultural costs of an increasingly "fast" and high-tech world.
3368 ANTH-330-90 Anthropology of Food 1.00 SEM Beebe, Rebecca W: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Because food is necessary to sustain biological life, its production and provision occupy humans everywhere. Due to this essential importance, food also operates to create and symbolize collective life. This seminar will examine the social and cultural significance of food. Topics to be discussed include the evolution of human food systems, the social and cultural relationships between food production and human reproduction, the development of women’s association with the domestic sphere, the meaning and experience of eating disorders, the connection between ethnic cuisines, nationalist movements and social classes, and the causes of famine.
1959 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
1857 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2119 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
3155 BIOL-141-01 Globl Pers Biodiversty&Conserv 1.00 LEC Pitt, Amber MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM AAC - GOODTH Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC Cross-listing: ENVS-141-01
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-years, 4 seats for sophomores, 2 for juniors, 3 for seniors.
  This lecture and discussion course focuses on the current biodiversity crisis. We will discuss biological diversity and where it is found and how it is monitored, direct and indirect values of biodiversity, and consequences of biodiversity loss. Topics of discussion will also include the problems of small populations, the politics of endangered species, species invasions and extinctions, and the role of humans in these processes, design and establishment of reserves, captive breeding, and the role that the public and governments play in conserving biological diversity. Not creditable to the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. This course is not open to students who have already received a C- or better in Biology 233 (Conservation Biology).
1580 BIOL-182-01 Evolution of Life 1.25 LEC Dunlap, Kent
Toscano, Benjamin
O'Donnell, Michael
Blackburn, Daniel
MF: 8:30AM-9:45AM MH - 203 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 58 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-90
  NOTE: Students with questions about this course or enrollment should contact Professor Dunlap.
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1581 BIOL-182-02 Evolution of Life 1.25 LEC Blackburn, Daniel
Toscano, Benjamin
O'Donnell, Michael
Dunlap, Kent
MF: 10:00AM-11:15AM MH - 203 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 58 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-91
  NOTE: Students with questions about this course or enrollment should contact Professor Blackburn.
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1582 BIOL-182-20 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire T: 2:00PM-4:40PM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-80
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1583 BIOL-182-21 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB O'Donnell, Michael W: 8:30AM-11:10AM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-81
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1584 BIOL-182-22 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire T: 9:20AM-12:00PM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-82
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1585 BIOL-182-23 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire R: 2:00PM-4:40PM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-83
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1861 BIOL-182-24 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB O'Donnell, Michael W: 2:00PM-4:40PM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-84
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1877 BIOL-182-25 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB O'Donnell, Michael R: 9:20AM-12:00PM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-85
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
1878 BIOL-182-26 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire W: 6:15PM-8:45PM LSC - 321 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-86
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3599 BIOL-182-80 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-20
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3600 BIOL-182-81 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB O'Donnell, Michael W: 8:30AM-11:10AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-21
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3601 BIOL-182-82 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire T: 9:20AM-12:00PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-22
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3603 BIOL-182-83 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire R: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-23
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3604 BIOL-182-84 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB O'Donnell, Michael W: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-24
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3606 BIOL-182-85 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB O'Donnell, Michael R: 9:20AM-12:00PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-25
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3607 BIOL-182-86 Evolution of Life 1.25 LAB Fournier, Claire W: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-26
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3597 BIOL-182-90 Evolution of Life 1.25 LEC Dunlap, Kent
Toscano, Benjamin
O'Donnell, Michael
Blackburn, Daniel
MF: 8:30AM-9:45AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-01
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3598 BIOL-182-91 Evolution of Life 1.25 LEC Blackburn, Daniel
Toscano, Benjamin
O'Donnell, Michael
Dunlap, Kent
MF: 10:00AM-11:15AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: BIOL-182-02
  This course will provide an introduction to life on Earth from an evolutionary perspective. Through lecture and discussion, we will examine evolutionary principles, inheritance, biodiversity, physiological adaptations, and ecology. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to explore biological concepts through observation, experimental design, and analysis.
3158 BIOL-206-80 Histophysiology 1.25 LAB Blackburn, Daniel W: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L, Biology 183L, and Chemistry 111L or Permission of Instructor.
  This course provides a comprehensive survey of the structure, composition, and function of tissues and their cellular and non-cellular components. Particular emphasis is placed on structural organization and structural-functional relationships of mammal tissues, with comparisons to other vertebrates. Recent microscopic research conducted at Trinity will also be considered. In the laboratory, students learn fundamentals of cell and tissue morphology through light microscopy and examination of electron micrographs. A background in general or organic chemistry is useful.
3157 BIOL-206-90 Histophysiology 1.25 LEC Blackburn, Daniel MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L, Biology 183L, and Chemistry 111L or Permission of Instructor.
  This course provides a comprehensive survey of the structure, composition, and function of tissues and their cellular and non-cellular components. Particular emphasis is placed on structural organization and structural-functional relationships of mammal tissues, with comparisons to other vertebrates. Recent microscopic research conducted at Trinity will also be considered. In the laboratory, students learn fundamentals of cell and tissue morphology through light microscopy and examination of electron micrographs. A background in general or organic chemistry is useful.
3751 BIOL-219-01 Endocrinology 1.00 LEC Sulkowski, Gisela MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM MH - 214A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L and Biology 183L or Permission of Instructor.
  NOTE: Students should contact Professor Foster for permission to enroll. Preference will be given to students in the class of 2023 who have demonstrated interest in pursuing a major in biology.
  The endocrine system coordinates the activity of tissues throughout the human body by releasing potent molecules called hormones into the blood. This course is designed to provide an overview of human endocrinology by following the molecular and cellular interactions of hormones. Course topics will include anatomy of endocrine organs, classification of hormones, and biosynthesis/secretion pathways within particular endocrine organs. It will also cover the mechanisms of receptor-mediated activity and target tissue interactions as well as regulation. In order to provide context and facilitate a broad understanding of the endocrine system, the course will cover clinical aspects relevant to each endocrine organ through case studies and discussion.
  View syllabus
3161 BIOL-244-01 Biology of Infect Disease 1.00 LEC Foster, Lisa-Anne MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM AAC - GH Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182L, Biology 183L, and Chemistry 111L or Permission of Instructor.
  The infectious disease process is multifactorial. In order to understand how bacteria and viruses cause disease, it is necessary to examine the delicate relationship that exists between the host and the infectious organism. This course will focus on understanding the human immune system in health and in disease, as well as the mechanisms employed by microorganisms to escape the immune response. A stepwise approach to the infectious process will be taken in this lecture- and discussion-based course, beginning with initial encounter between the host and the infectious agent and ending with the transmission of the agent to a new host. Although human disease will be the main focus, some infectious agents of plants and other animals will also be discussed.
2247 BIOL-317-01 Biochemistry 1.25 LEC Guardiola-Diaz, Hebe TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM LSC - 134 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, Biology 182L and Biology 183L.
  A study of the molecular reactions that sustain life. Topics include biomolecule structure and function, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, and integration and regulation of metabolic pathways. The laboratory exercises include chromatography, electrophoresis, spectroscopy and bioinformatic analysis.
2248 BIOL-317-20 Biochemistry 1.25 LAB Guardiola-Diaz, Hebe T: 2:00PM-5:15PM LSC - 334 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, Biology 182L and Biology 183L.
  A study of the molecular reactions that sustain life. Topics include biomolecule structure and function, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, and integration and regulation of metabolic pathways. The laboratory exercises include chromatography, electrophoresis, spectroscopy and bioinformatic analysis.
2599 BIOL-317-21 Biochemistry 1.25 LAB Guardiola-Diaz, Hebe W: 2:00PM-5:15PM LSC - 334 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, Biology 182L and Biology 183L.
  A study of the molecular reactions that sustain life. Topics include biomolecule structure and function, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, and integration and regulation of metabolic pathways. The laboratory exercises include chromatography, electrophoresis, spectroscopy and bioinformatic analysis.
3162 BIOL-319-01 Animal Physiology 1.25 LEC Dunlap, Kent TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM LSC - 134 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182, Biology 183, and Chemistry 111 or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the physiological mechanisms underlying four fundamental functions—movement, sensation, feeding, and reproduction. How do physiological systems operate to enable organisms to live in drastically different habitats? What are the common cellular and molecular mechanisms shared by diverse animals? The laboratory will consist of several preparations examining developmental, sensory, endocrine, and muscle physiology, followed by more detailed, independent investigations of one of these preparations.
3163 BIOL-319-20 Animal Physiology 1.25 LAB Dunlap, Kent R: 2:00PM-5:15PM LSC - 316 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182, Biology 183, and Chemistry 111 or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the physiological mechanisms underlying four fundamental functions—movement, sensation, feeding, and reproduction. How do physiological systems operate to enable organisms to live in drastically different habitats? What are the common cellular and molecular mechanisms shared by diverse animals? The laboratory will consist of several preparations examining developmental, sensory, endocrine, and muscle physiology, followed by more detailed, independent investigations of one of these preparations.
3611 BIOL-319-21 Animal Physiology 1.25 LAB Dunlap, Kent T: 2:00PM-5:15PM LSC - 308 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 182, Biology 183, and Chemistry 111 or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the physiological mechanisms underlying four fundamental functions—movement, sensation, feeding, and reproduction. How do physiological systems operate to enable organisms to live in drastically different habitats? What are the common cellular and molecular mechanisms shared by diverse animals? The laboratory will consist of several preparations examining developmental, sensory, endocrine, and muscle physiology, followed by more detailed, independent investigations of one of these preparations.
1544 BIOL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Independent research supervised by a faculty member in an area of the student’s special interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2212 BIOL-403-01 Research Seminar 0.50 SEM Blackburn, Daniel F: 2:00PM-4:40PM LSC - 134 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is open to seniors only.
  Students engaged in laboratory or field research, as well as honors candidates conducting library research, will meet with the biology faculty for oral presentations and critical discussions of journal papers, research plans, and research progress. Concurrent enrollment in either Biology 419 or 425 is required.
1545 BIOL-419-01 Research in Biology - Lib 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Requires completion of a Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  Students will conduct library research projects under the direction of an individual faculty member. Students electing this type of independent study should plan on a full semester culminating with the completion of a final formal paper. Seniors and those using library research to satisfy the Group IV requirement must simultaneously enroll in the Research Seminar (Biology 403). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2127 BIOL-425-01 Research Biology 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
3409 BIOL-429-01 Behavioral Ecology 1.00 SEM Toscano, Benjamin T: 2:00PM-4:40PM LSC - 134 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  PR: BIOL333Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology 333L or Permission of Instructor.
  Animal behavior provides and promotes connections across different levels of biological organization. This course will explore how behavior functions as a link between individual physiology and broader scale population, community and evolutionary ecology. The central component of the course is to design, conduct, analyze and present behavioral ecology experiments using aquatic invertebrates as model systems. Additional course components include lectures and primary literature discussions. This is a writing intensive course and fulfills the group IV requirement for the biology major.
1546 BIOL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students who have been invited to serve as teaching assistants will register for this course. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment. See paragraph on teaching assistants in the description of the major. Not creditable to the major.
2552 BIOL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
3570 CHEM-111-01 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Bazilio, Arianne MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM CT - CINESTUDIO Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
3572 CHEM-111-02 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Puljung, Michael MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM MC - AUD Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-111-92
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
3575 CHEM-111-20 Intro Chemistry I Lab 0.25 LAB Fitzgerald, Edward M: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions.
3576 CHEM-111-21 Intro Chemistry I Lab 0.25 LAB Fitzgerald, Edward T: 8:30AM-11:45AM CT - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions.
3577 CHEM-111-22 Intro Chemistry I Lab 0.25 LAB Fitzgerald, Edward T: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions.
3578 CHEM-111-23 Intro Chemistry I Lab 0.25 LAB Crist, Natalie W: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions.
3579 CHEM-111-24 Intro Chemistry I Lab 0.25 LAB Crist, Natalie R: 8:30AM-11:45AM CT - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions.
3580 CHEM-111-25 Intro Chemistry I Lab 0.25 LAB Fitzgerald, Edward R: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 213 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions.
3571 CHEM-111-91 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Cancelled Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
3573 CHEM-111-92 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Puljung, Michael MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-111-02
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
3569 CHEM-111-93 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Parr, Maria MWF: 7:20AM-8:25AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
3574 CHEM-111-94 Intro Chemistry 1.00 LEC Parr, Maria MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
3581 CHEM-211-01 Elem Organic Chem I 1.00 LEC Jee, Jo-Ann MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM SH - S201 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-211-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A systematic study of the compounds of carbon, including methods of synthesis and correlation of chemical and physical properties with structure. Introduction to certain theoretical concepts.
3583 CHEM-211-02 Elem Organic Chem I 1.00 LEC Curran, Timothy MWF: 7:20AM-8:25AM CT - 308 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-211-91
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A systematic study of the compounds of carbon, including methods of synthesis and correlation of chemical and physical properties with structure. Introduction to certain theoretical concepts.
3589 CHEM-211-20 Elem Organic Chem I Lab 0.25 LAB Crist, Natalie M: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 301 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Elementary Organic Chemistry I Lab
3590 CHEM-211-21 Elem Organic Chem I Lab 0.25 LAB Crist, Natalie T: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 301 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Elementary Organic Chemistry I Lab
3591 CHEM-211-22 Elem Organic Chem I Lab 0.25 LAB Jee, Jo-Ann R: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 301 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Elementary Organic Chemistry I Lab
3582 CHEM-211-90 Elem Organic Chem I 1.00 LEC Jee, Jo-Ann MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-211-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A systematic study of the compounds of carbon, including methods of synthesis and correlation of chemical and physical properties with structure. Introduction to certain theoretical concepts.
3584 CHEM-211-91 Elem Organic Chem I 1.00 LEC Curran, Timothy MWF: 7:20AM-8:25AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-211-02
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A systematic study of the compounds of carbon, including methods of synthesis and correlation of chemical and physical properties with structure. Introduction to certain theoretical concepts.
1014 CHEM-309-01 Physical Chemistry I 1.25 LEC Prigodich, Richard MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM CT - 308 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-309-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 and Physics 231L.
  A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the development of the theory and application of thermodynamics and kinetics to chemical systems. Special consideration will be given to the theoretical treatment of solution chemistry (e.g., colligative properties, electrolyte theory).
1015 CHEM-309-20 Physical Chemistry I 1.25 LAB Prigodich, Richard M: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 207 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 and Physics 231L.
  A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the development of the theory and application of thermodynamics and kinetics to chemical systems. Special consideration will be given to the theoretical treatment of solution chemistry (e.g., colligative properties, electrolyte theory).
3592 CHEM-309-21 Physical Chemistry I 1.25 LAB Prigodich, Richard R: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 207 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 and Physics 231L.
  A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the development of the theory and application of thermodynamics and kinetics to chemical systems. Special consideration will be given to the theoretical treatment of solution chemistry (e.g., colligative properties, electrolyte theory).
3651 CHEM-309-90 Physical Chemistry I 1.25 LEC Prigodich, Richard MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-309-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 and Physics 231L.
  A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the development of the theory and application of thermodynamics and kinetics to chemical systems. Special consideration will be given to the theoretical treatment of solution chemistry (e.g., colligative properties, electrolyte theory).
3675 CHEM-311-01 Analytical Chemistry 1.00 LEC Morrison, Janet MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM CT - 308 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-311-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A lecture course covering the theory and practice of chemical analysis techniques in a quantitative manner. Detailed discussion of simple and complex acid-base equilibria, and complex buffer systems, will be presented, as will related solubility problems, complex metal-ligand solution equilibria, and oxidation reduction equilibria. Stoichiometry will also be addressed in a systematic way. These techniques will be applied in the laboratory, where accuracy and precision will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed on useful chemical reactions for analysis purposes. Latter stages of the course will deal with potentiometry, spectrometry, and chromatographic theory, both gas and liquid, as a separation tool with practical applications.
3677 CHEM-311-20 Analytical Chemistry Lab 0.25 LAB Morrison, Janet T: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - 207 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-311-80
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L, Corequisite: CHEM 311 Lecture
  A laboratory course covering the theory and practice of chemical analysis techniques in a quantitative manner. Detailed discussion of simple and complex acid-base equilibria, and complex buffer systems, will be presented, as will related solubility problems, complex metal-ligand solution equilibria, and oxidation reduction equilibria. Stoichiometry will also be addressed in a systematic way. These techniques will be applied in the laboratory, where accuracy and precision will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed on useful chemical reactions for analysis purposes. Latter stages of the course will deal with potentiometry, spectrometry, and chromatographic theory, both gas and liquid, as a separation tool with practical applications.
3676 CHEM-311-90 Analytical Chemistry 1.00 LEC Morrison, Janet MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-311-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A lecture course covering the theory and practice of chemical analysis techniques in a quantitative manner. Detailed discussion of simple and complex acid-base equilibria, and complex buffer systems, will be presented, as will related solubility problems, complex metal-ligand solution equilibria, and oxidation reduction equilibria. Stoichiometry will also be addressed in a systematic way. These techniques will be applied in the laboratory, where accuracy and precision will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed on useful chemical reactions for analysis purposes. Latter stages of the course will deal with potentiometry, spectrometry, and chromatographic theory, both gas and liquid, as a separation tool with practical applications.
1016 CHEM-313-01 Princ Inorganic Chem 1.00 LEC Parr, Maria MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM LIB - 181 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
  A study of atomic structure, the chemical bond, and molecular and ionic structure of inorganic compounds, and an introduction to the principles of coordination chemistry.
3203 CHEM-403-01 Advanced Organic Chemistry I 1.00 LEC Curran, Timothy TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM CT - 210 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-403-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or permission of instructor.
  Normally (but not restricted to) topics in theoretical organic chemistry. Emphasis on recent developments.
3596 CHEM-403-90 Advanced Organic Chemistry I 1.00 LEC Curran, Timothy TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: CHEM-403-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or permission of instructor.
  Normally (but not restricted to) topics in theoretical organic chemistry. Emphasis on recent developments.
1538 CHEM-425-01 Research (Laboratory) 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan on initiating work no later than the fall of the senior year, and should also plan on no less than two semesters of study with the completion of a final formal paper. Participation in the weekly Friday departmental seminar series is mandatory. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
3202 CHEM-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment. This course will be graded as Pass / Low Pass / Fail.
1535 CHEM-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1561 CLAS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2246 CLAS-401-90 Senior Seminar/Special Topics 1.00 SEM Risser, Martha MW: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  A senior capstone course that combines seminar meetings with independent study and the writing of a final essay under the direction of a member of the department. Required of all Classics majors and open to all Classics minors (Classical Antiquity, Classical Tradition, Greek, and Latin). Approval of the chair is required.
1562 CLAS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
2458 CLIC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1613 CLIC-400-01 Community Lrng Research Coll. 0.50 SEM Holt, Laura F: 12:00PM-1:00PM SH - S205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This seminar offers a discussion and presentation forum for the research projects undertaken by student participants in the Community Learning Program for community-based research.
1881 COLL-199-90 Trinity Portfolio Prgram 0.25 SEM Jones, Jason W: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 11 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for juniors, sophomores and first year students.
  Students will build an electronic portfolio of their academic work, working with a faculty portfolio advisor and a group of nine students. Students will select at least one piece of work from each class, review them with the group, and improve them when appropriate. Students will also produce an extracurricular writing specific to their class year and major. Students will be provided support in developing their portfolio for use in graduate school applications and job interviews and applications.
2762 COLL-220-90 Research Methods&Info Resource 0.50 LEC Walsh, Robert T: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Do you want to be great at researching information for your courses? Would you like to search library databases in your major as well as a librarian does? Would you like to be a Master Googler? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, then you should take this course. Information is everywhere. But, let’s face it--it’s not always easy to find the exact information you need, when you need it. This course will provide you with the tools and concepts to become a versatile researcher. You will learn to interpret and use a wide variety of resources, understand the ways that information is organized for researchers in different disciplines, and develop effective strategies for evaluating, managing, and sharing information.
1595 COLL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1018 CPSC-115-01 Introduction to Computing 1.25 LEC Yoon, Peter MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM HAM - 100DNG Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-115-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110 or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-year students, 16 seats for sophomores, and 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  A fundamental treatment of computer science topics featuring the study of the high-level programming language Python. Topics discussed will include computer architecture, programming languages, and ethical issues involved in computer use. Problem-solving techniques involved in writing programs will be studied, proper style and documentation will be required, and object-oriented program design will be introduced. A required weekly lab will involve an intensive study of programming techniques in Python.
1019 CPSC-115-20 Introduction to Computing 1.25 LAB Yoon, Peter M: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 136 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-115-80
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110 or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  A fundamental treatment of computer science topics featuring the study of the high-level programming language Python. Topics discussed will include computer architecture, programming languages, and ethical issues involved in computer use. Problem-solving techniques involved in writing programs will be studied, proper style and documentation will be required, and object-oriented program design will be introduced. A required weekly lab will involve an intensive study of programming techniques in Python.
1020 CPSC-115-21 Introduction to Computing 1.25 LAB Yoon, Peter T: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 136 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-115-81
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110 or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  A fundamental treatment of computer science topics featuring the study of the high-level programming language Python. Topics discussed will include computer architecture, programming languages, and ethical issues involved in computer use. Problem-solving techniques involved in writing programs will be studied, proper style and documentation will be required, and object-oriented program design will be introduced. A required weekly lab will involve an intensive study of programming techniques in Python.
3470 CPSC-115-80 Introduction to Computing 1.25 LAB Yoon, Peter M: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-115-20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110 or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  A fundamental treatment of computer science topics featuring the study of the high-level programming language Python. Topics discussed will include computer architecture, programming languages, and ethical issues involved in computer use. Problem-solving techniques involved in writing programs will be studied, proper style and documentation will be required, and object-oriented program design will be introduced. A required weekly lab will involve an intensive study of programming techniques in Python.
3472 CPSC-115-81 Introduction to Computing 1.25 LAB Yoon, Peter T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-115-21
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110 or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  A fundamental treatment of computer science topics featuring the study of the high-level programming language Python. Topics discussed will include computer architecture, programming languages, and ethical issues involved in computer use. Problem-solving techniques involved in writing programs will be studied, proper style and documentation will be required, and object-oriented program design will be introduced. A required weekly lab will involve an intensive study of programming techniques in Python.
3469 CPSC-115-90 Introduction to Computing 1.25 LEC Yoon, Peter MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-115-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110 or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, and 5 seats for sophomores
  A fundamental treatment of computer science topics featuring the study of the high-level programming language Python. Topics discussed will include computer architecture, programming languages, and ethical issues involved in computer use. Problem-solving techniques involved in writing programs will be studied, proper style and documentation will be required, and object-oriented program design will be introduced. A required weekly lab will involve an intensive study of programming techniques in Python.
3110 CPSC-203-01 Math Foundatns of Comput 1.00 LEC Armen, Chris MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM SH - N217 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-203-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110, or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 15 seats reserved for sophomores.
  An introduction to the principles of logic and discrete mathematics required in the study of computer science. Topics covered may include: propositional and predicate logic and their relationship to general proof techniques used in computing and correctness proofs of programs; mathematical induction applied to recursion and recurrence relations; set theory with an emphasis on infinite sets used in computing; counting principles useful in analyzing graphs and trees; relations and functions and their relationship to databases and functional programming languages. Computer programs will be used to explore concepts examined in the course.
3706 CPSC-203-02 Math Foundatns of Comput 1.00 LEC Armen, Chris MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM SH - N217 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-203-91
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110, or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  An introduction to the principles of logic and discrete mathematics required in the study of computer science. Topics covered may include: propositional and predicate logic and their relationship to general proof techniques used in computing and correctness proofs of programs; mathematical induction applied to recursion and recurrence relations; set theory with an emphasis on infinite sets used in computing; counting principles useful in analyzing graphs and trees; relations and functions and their relationship to databases and functional programming languages. Computer programs will be used to explore concepts examined in the course.
3473 CPSC-203-90 Math Foundatns of Comput 1.00 LEC Armen, Chris MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-203-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110, or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  An introduction to the principles of logic and discrete mathematics required in the study of computer science. Topics covered may include: propositional and predicate logic and their relationship to general proof techniques used in computing and correctness proofs of programs; mathematical induction applied to recursion and recurrence relations; set theory with an emphasis on infinite sets used in computing; counting principles useful in analyzing graphs and trees; relations and functions and their relationship to databases and functional programming languages. Computer programs will be used to explore concepts examined in the course.
3707 CPSC-203-91 Math Foundatns of Comput 1.00 LEC Armen, Chris MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-203-02
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 110, or mathematics skills appropriate for enrolling in a calculus class.
  An introduction to the principles of logic and discrete mathematics required in the study of computer science. Topics covered may include: propositional and predicate logic and their relationship to general proof techniques used in computing and correctness proofs of programs; mathematical induction applied to recursion and recurrence relations; set theory with an emphasis on infinite sets used in computing; counting principles useful in analyzing graphs and trees; relations and functions and their relationship to databases and functional programming languages. Computer programs will be used to explore concepts examined in the course.
1602 CPSC-275-01 Intro to Computer Systems 1.25 LEC Armen, Chris MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM LSC - AUD Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-275-90
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Computer Science 115 or a C- or better in Computer Science 215L.
  This course introduces the fundamental organization and structure of modern computer systems from the perspective of a programmer. Students will become more effective programmers as they learn how computer systems compile, link, and execute programs, store information, and communicate. Topics covered will include data representations, computer arithmetic, low-level representations of programs, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and management, processes, and system-level I/O. A required weekly lab will involve a series of programming exercises related to these topics.
1603 CPSC-275-20 Intro to Computer Systems 1.25 LAB Armen, Chris W: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 124 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-275-80
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Computer Science 115 or a C- or better in Computer Science 215L.
  This course introduces the fundamental organization and structure of modern computer systems from the perspective of a programmer. Students will become more effective programmers as they learn how computer systems compile, link, and execute programs, store information, and communicate. Topics covered will include data representations, computer arithmetic, low-level representations of programs, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and management, processes, and system-level I/O. A required weekly lab will involve a series of programming exercises related to these topics.
2443 CPSC-275-21 Intro to Computer Systems 1.25 LAB Yoon, Peter R: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 124 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-275-81
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Computer Science 115 or a C- or better in Computer Science 215L.
  This course introduces the fundamental organization and structure of modern computer systems from the perspective of a programmer. Students will become more effective programmers as they learn how computer systems compile, link, and execute programs, store information, and communicate. Topics covered will include data representations, computer arithmetic, low-level representations of programs, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and management, processes, and system-level I/O. A required weekly lab will involve a series of programming exercises related to these topics.
3478 CPSC-275-80 Intro to Computer Systems 1.25 LAB Armen, Chris W: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-275-20
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Computer Science 115 or a C- or better in Computer Science 215L.
  This course introduces the fundamental organization and structure of modern computer systems from the perspective of a programmer. Students will become more effective programmers as they learn how computer systems compile, link, and execute programs, store information, and communicate. Topics covered will include data representations, computer arithmetic, low-level representations of programs, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and management, processes, and system-level I/O. A required weekly lab will involve a series of programming exercises related to these topics.
3480 CPSC-275-81 Intro to Computer Systems 1.25 LAB Yoon, Peter R: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-275-21
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Computer Science 115 or a C- or better in Computer Science 215L.
  This course introduces the fundamental organization and structure of modern computer systems from the perspective of a programmer. Students will become more effective programmers as they learn how computer systems compile, link, and execute programs, store information, and communicate. Topics covered will include data representations, computer arithmetic, low-level representations of programs, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and management, processes, and system-level I/O. A required weekly lab will involve a series of programming exercises related to these topics.
3474 CPSC-275-90 Intro to Computer Systems 1.25 LEC Armen, Chris MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: CPSC-275-01
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Computer Science 115 or a C- or better in Computer Science 215L.
  This course introduces the fundamental organization and structure of modern computer systems from the perspective of a programmer. Students will become more effective programmers as they learn how computer systems compile, link, and execute programs, store information, and communicate. Topics covered will include data representations, computer arithmetic, low-level representations of programs, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and management, processes, and system-level I/O. A required weekly lab will involve a series of programming exercises related to these topics.
3113 CPSC-315-90 Systems Software 1.00 LEC Spezialetti, Madalene TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 215L, 275L and 203 (or concurrent enrollment in CPSC 203)
  A study of the organization and implementation of computer operating systems. Topics include operating systems organization, file systems, memory and process management, resource allocation, recovery procedures, multiprogramming, and distributed processing. The Unix operating system will be used and emphasis will be placed on how various system functions have been implemented in the Unix environment.
3114 CPSC-340-90 Software Engineering 1.00 LEC Spezialetti, Madalene T: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 215L and Computer Science 203 (or concurrent enrollment in 203).
  The study of issues involved in developing large-scale software systems. Topics covered include software life cycle, system design and specification, advanced programming concepts, and techniques for software testing, debugging, and maintenance. The issues studied will be applied to team projects.
3115 CPSC-385-01 Computer Security 1.00 LEC Syta, Ewa TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM AAC - GH Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 203, 215L and 275L
  Introduction to computer security, the practice of protecting information and computer systems from unauthorized actions. Topics covered in the course include information and computer security principles; basic adversarial models and threats; applied cryptography; network, software, operating system, and web security; real-world security protocols; policy, administration and auditing; and legal and ethical issues. Topics on privacy, anonymity, surveillance and a variety of modern, widely available tools for secure communication will also be discussed.
1483 CPSC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Independent work to develop maturity and initiative in the solution of a problem in the area of the student's special interests. This course may require concurrent registration in Computer Science 403 or 404. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1021 CPSC-403-90 Computer Science Seminar 0.50 SEM Yoon, Peter W: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students engaged in research (Computer Science 419) or independent study (Computer Science 399) and senior exercise students will meet with computer science faculty for oral presentations and critical discussions of journal papers, research plans, and research progress. Seniors using this course to satisfy the senior exercise requirement will be expected to complete a research or design project and make a formal presentation on its results to the seminar. The project may be an extension or revision of a project conducted in one of their other major courses.
1563 CPSC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1558 CPSC-498-01 Senior Project Part 1 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is comprised of a research or implementation project and a final written report. This course is required for all senior computer science majors. Students must locate a project advisor and must submit a preliminary proposal to the project adviser by the last day of classes in the spring semester of the junior year. In addition to the proposal, submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long project. The course credits are considered pending in the first semester and will be awarded upon completion of the second semester.
2796 CTYP-101-90 Intro Seminar-Urban Studies 1.00 SEM Gamble, Julie TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y FYR5  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Only students in The Cities Program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  This seminar provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy. This writing-intensive course will engage students in learning how to do research in urban studies, and students will produce a set of smaller papers and a term paper that reflects the breadth and depth of their introductory understanding of the field.
3086 CTYP-106-90 History of the City 1.00 LEC Elukin, Jonathan MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Only students in The Cities Program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  The "History of the City" is an introduction to the origins and evolutions of cities, beginning with the first urban locations in Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean. We will consider these questions: What makes a city? How did cities develop in other major civilizations such as those of China, the Islamic world, and the Americas? How did the city become a crucial engine for the development of human culture, including religion, law, commerce, education, cosmopolitanism, and empire? How have cities adapted to climate change, disease, and immigration? Through the study of primary historical sources and the image of the city in art and literature, students will acquire the historical context and vocabulary to continue their study of cities in the modern world.
3524 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Zelada-Aprili, Raul MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM HHN - 104 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
2851 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark, Carol MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM MECC - 270 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
1431 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark, Carol MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM MECC - 270 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
3182 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Zelada-Aprili, Raul MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM HHN - 104 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
3723 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM MECC - 270 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
3526 ECON-101-90 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Tomolonis, Paul MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: A grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken, a grade of B or better is required). Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers.
3183 ECON-103-01 Fundamentals of Accounting 1.00 LEC Tomolonis, Paul TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM LSC - AUD Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Senior economics and coordinate majors have first choice for enrollment, then junior economics and coordinate majors, then sophomores. Senior and junior non-majors need permission of instructor.
  A review of accounting concepts and procedures, with particular emphasis on the reasoning behind methods of measuring and recording such items as depreciation and revenues. The implications of accounting theory and practice for the measurement of income and financial positions are investigated.
3528 ECON-209-01 Urban Economics 1.00 LEC Ahmed, Rasha TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM WM - 224 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Economic analysis of urban areas in the regional setting; the study of location theory, land use and housing markets, and of current public policy issues pertaining to urban problems including urban poverty, the economics of race and metropolitan areas, urban transportation, and local public finance. The resource allocation process will be emphasized.
3736 ECON-210-01 Contemporary Micro Issues 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM WM - 224 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  This course covers economic decision-making by individuals, firms and factor markets, and the role of government in designing economic policy and its impact on individuals. Topics include: Price discrimination; cartels, oligopolies, and monopolistic competition; economics of network goods; labor markets; public goods; political economy; economics, ethics and public policy; incentives; stock markets and consumer choice. Some of the questions we will try to answer among others are: Is in-state vs out-of-state tuition an example of price discrimination? Can OPEC nations collude to force up the price of oil? Why do friends so often enjoy the same musical songs? Why is it that the world is running out of so many kinds of fish? Are markets fair?
2231 ECON-218-01 Intro to Stats for Econ 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena MW: 8:05AM-9:45AM WM - 224 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 or permission of instructor.
  As data and computing resources have become increasingly accessible, economics has become more concerned with measurement and estimation of economic phenomena. This course is designed to familiarize students with common statistical methods used in economics. Topics will include the presentation of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.
3184 ECON-221-90 Central Bank & Fin Markets 1.00 LEC Comert, Hasan MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Since the 1980s, financial systems in developing and developed countries have been evolving with enormous speed. During this period, central banking in many countries underwent several important changes too. The financial system and central banking cannot be understood independently of one another. On the one hand, central banking policy choices and the regulatory framework affect the financial system. On the other hand the effectiveness of central banking policies is determined by developments in the financial system. Recently, central bankers and monetary theorists have been forced to reconsider their theories and practices in response to the global financial This class focuses on the co-evolution of central banking and financial markets and the very recent changes in central banking theories and practices.
2433 ECON-231-01 Latn Am & Carib Econ Dev 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM HHN - 104 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 22 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  This course examines and evaluates the major theories and leading issues in the study of economic growth and development in Latin America and the Caribbean during the 20th century. It focuses on the region's economic and historical links to industrialized nations as a key element in understanding the nature and direction of its economic growth and development. Topics include: theories of development; rural development and migration; state-led industrialization and structural transformation under import-substitution industrialization (ISI); debt, stabilization, and adjustment policies; neoliberal policies such as privatization and the deregulation of financial and labor markets; and trade liberalization, particularly the proliferation of preferential trading arrangements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR), the Caribbean Common Market (CARICOM), the Lome Convention, and the Central American Common Market (CACM).
1484 ECON-299-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1022 ECON-301-90 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Grossberg, Adam MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
1522 ECON-301-91 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Grossberg, Adam MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
3709 ECON-301-92 Microeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Grossberg, Adam MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 301 and either Economics 101 or 302 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 301 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  A study of the determination of the prices of goods and productive factors in a market economy and the role of prices in the allocation of resources. Required of all majors in economics.
3185 ECON-302-01 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM LSC - 138-9 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ECON-302-90
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
3186 ECON-302-02 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM LSC - 138-9 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ECON-302-91
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
3187 ECON-302-03 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Bent, Peter MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM LSC - AUD Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
3188 ECON-302-04 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Bent, Peter MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM LSC - AUD Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
3531 ECON-302-90 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ECON-302-01
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
3534 ECON-302-91 Macroeconomic Theory 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ECON-302-02
  Prerequisite: B- or better in Economics 101, and C- or better in one 200 level economics course or sophomore or higher class standing. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 302 and either Economics 101 or 301 is not allowed.
  NOTE: Students are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 302 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in Economics.
  NOTE: If you currently are not a declared economics major and you will be a junior or senior when you take this course, permission of the instructor is required. If you do enroll, you will be dropped.
  An analysis of aggregate income, output, and employment, which includes the following topics: national economic accounts; theories of consumption; investment and money; Keynesian and Classical models; the monetary-fiscal debate; inflation, unemployment and growth. Required of all majors in economics.
3189 ECON-306-01 Public Finance 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM MECC - 270 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020
  An examination of the role of tax and public expenditure policies as they influence the allocation and distribution of resources, and on the role of market imperfections as rationales for government policies. Emphasis is on the effects of taxation and public spending on consumer and producer choices.
2590 ECON-307-01 Health Economics 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM HAM - 100DNG Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  This course will study the characteristics of the U.S. health care system and the functioning of the health care market using the tools of microeconomic theory. The aim of the course will be to discuss specific topics in the economics of health, including: the analysis of the causes of health-related behaviors such as obesity and substance abuse; the characteristics of the health care industry and how it is affected by insurance and medical technology; and the impact of government policies on health related behaviors and the provision of medical care. The role of preventive measures and the efficient use of limited healthcare resources will be examined in light of the recent health care reform and in light of their broader implications for public policy.
3190 ECON-308-01 Industrial Organization 1.00 LEC Ruiz Sanchez, Gerardo MW: 8:05AM-9:45AM HAM - 100DNG Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301. (Calculus is recommended, but not required)
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  The course is divided into two parts. The first part consists of an examination of the structure of American industry including a critical analysis of the empirical evidence underlying the extent of competition, oligopoly, and monopoly within the United States. Comparisons are made with other industrialized nations and a number of specific industries are examined in detail. The second part of the course consists of an examination of public policy toward monopoly with specific emphasis on regulation and antitrust policies.
1866 ECON-309-01 Corporate Finance 1.00 LEC Hoag, Christopher TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM MC - AUD Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in either Economics 301 or Economics 302. Economics 218, 103 or Mathematics 207 are strongly recommended.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  Valuation, the development of the modern theory of finance; efficient market hypothesis; portfolio theory; capital budgeting; cost of capital; corporate securities; the securities markets; and other selected topics in finance.
3536 ECON-309-02 Corporate Finance 1.00 LEC Hoag, Christopher TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM MC - AUD Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in either Economics 301 or Economics 302. Economics 218, 103 or Mathematics 207 are strongly recommended.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  Valuation, the development of the modern theory of finance; efficient market hypothesis; portfolio theory; capital budgeting; cost of capital; corporate securities; the securities markets; and other selected topics in finance.
3191 ECON-312-01 Mathematical Economics 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM WM - 224 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or 302, and a C- or better in Mathematics 126 or Mathematics 131.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course is designed to introduce students to the application of mathematical concepts and techniques to economic problems and economic theory.
3377 ECON-315-01 International Trade 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM LSC - 138-9 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020.
  An examination of the major theories of international trade, beginning with the classical and neoclassical models of international trade and concluding with a survey of the various alternative models of international trade developed over the past three decades. An analysis of commercial policy, preferential trading agreements and other contemporary policy issues in the international economy will be included.
3292 ECON-317-01 Development Economics 1.00 LEC Jogani, Chitra TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM HAM - 100DNG Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  This course is an introduction to the economy of the developing or the lower- and middle-income countries. The course will discuss the institutional structure, the reasons for underdevelopment, and possible solutions to the unique challenges faced by the developing countries. Topics include comparative economic development, poverty, inequality, foreign aid, corruption, the situation of health, education, and the environment in developing countries. On completion of the course, a student will have an increased awareness of the challenges faced by developing countries and be able to use economic concepts to think and analyze the different issues.
2234 ECON-318-20 Basic Econometrics with Lab 1.25 LAB Zannoni, Diane M: 5:30PM-7:00PM WM - 224 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  NOTE: Students must enroll in both the lecture and lab. The day and time of the lab will be scheduled to accommodate all enrolled students
  NOTE: For students who took Econ 218 in spring 2020 the prerequisite will be a P or a C- or above.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. Students must also enroll in the required lab for this course.
2233 ECON-318-90 Basic Econometrics with Lab 1.25 LEC Zannoni, Diane MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.
  NOTE: Students must enroll in both the lecture and lab. The day and time of the lab will be scheduled to accommodate all enrolled students
  NOTE: For students who took Econ 218 in spring 2020 the prerequisite will be a P or a C- or above.
  The formulation and estimation of models; topics include a review of basic concepts and results of statistical inference, single equation regression model, functional forms, problems of estimation, and simultaneous equation models. Students must also enroll in the required lab for this course.
3192 ECON-334-01 Law and Economics 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM AAC - GOODTH Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken spring 2020
  Legal rules of property, contract and tort law create implicit prices that incentivize individuals behavior and motivate the economic approach to the study of law. This course brings together the two disciplines of economics and law to examine fundamental rules governing an exchange economy. Topics to be covered include property law, tort law (non-criminal harm or injuries), contract law and crime. Please note, this is not a course in law but in economic analysis of the law.
3537 ECON-336-01 The Market for Green Goods 1.00 LEC Ahmed, Rasha TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM WM - 224 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 if taken Spring 2020.
  In many contexts, environmental and social damages can be significantly reduced if consumers substitute towards a greener version of the given products, e.g. organic food, energy efficient appliances, and green diamonds. The course will investigate alternative methods to promote green goods markets. These methods range from regulation to purely voluntary approaches taken by a firm or an entire industry. In addition, the course investigates the role of market competition, technological advances, product labeling and firm image in the development of green markets. The analysis involves the use of microeconomic theory as well as several case studies.
1485 ECON-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1587 ECON-401-01 Ind Study in Quantitative Apps 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 312 or Economics 318
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3193 ECON-402-01 Senior Thesis Seminar Part I 0.50 SEM Ahmed, Rasha TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This seminar will address the research and thesis writing process and will include workshops on writing, data and library resources. In addition, students will be asked to present preliminary work for discussion to seminar participants, and to participate in three sets of presentations to the Department during the academic year.
3195 ECON-431-59 Drug Policy 1.00 SEM Stater, Mark TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM LIB - 181 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken Spring 2020.
  Humans have consumed psychoactive substances such as cannabis, opium, coca, and magic mushrooms for medicinal, religious, and recreational purposes for thousands of years. Yet, many of these substances, as well as more recent psychoactive concoctions, such as heroin and cocaine, are prohibited in contemporary societies on the grounds that they are harmful to users and others. How and why might society’s view of these drugs’ harmfulness have changed over time? What impact do prohibition policies have on the consumption of drugs, and what kinds of unintended consequences do these policies have for society as a whole and for marginalized groups? Are there alternative policies that can deter drug consumption with fewer unintended effects? This course will apply economic analysis to offer answers to these questions, while examining how prohibition policies have evolved over the last century, how the current framework is codified, some of the recent departures from that framework in the U.S. and around the world, and prospects for future reforms.
  View syllabus
3538 ECON-431-90 Central Bnk & Fin Innovations 1.00 SEM Comert, Hasan MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302. This course is open to senior Economics majors only.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C-, P or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken Spring 2020.
  This seminar provides a critical analysis of the rationale, behavior, and effectiveness of central banking and alternative monetary institutions. It will emphasize the Federal Reserve System and alternative monetary arrangements from historical and analytical standpoints, treating in detail the formulation and execution of monetary policy in the context of both domestic and international constraints. Attention also is given to the European Monetary Union and current issues in international monetary relations.
1486 ECON-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. Cannot be used for major credit.
3414 ECON-490-01 Research Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is designed to provide economics students with the opportunity to undertake substantial (collaborative) economics and/or econometrics work with a full-time economics faculty member. Students need to complete a special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office and have it signed by the supervising instructor. With permission, students may apply up to one credit toward major requirements.
1487 ECON-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 and 302.
  Written report and formal presentation of a research project. Open to all senior majors and required of all students who wish to earn honors in economics. A student who intends to write a thesis must locate a thesis adviser, and must submit a preliminary proposal to the thesis adviser by the last day of classes in the spring semester of the junior year. A final proposal must be submitted to the thesis adviser by final registration in the fall semester of the senior year. Submission date of the thesis is the third Thursday following spring recess. Seniors who undertake Economics 498-99 will be excused from Economics 431. Studies in Social Policies and Economic Research. In addition to the final proposal, submission of the special registration form available in the Registrar's Office and the approval of the instructor is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
1875 EDUC-200-01 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Cancelled Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: 8 seats are reserved for First Year Students.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3506 EDUC-200-80 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TBA N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3505 EDUC-200-90 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Castillo, Elise TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3485 EDUC-303-90 Sociology of Education 1.00 SEM Douglas, Daniel TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: SOCL-303-90
  PR: EDUC200 or SOCL101
  This course will examine and apply a sociological perspective to education and schooling. It will examine the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that culture and social structures affect educational institutions. It begins by surveying texts which look at education and schooling from different viewpoints within sociological theory (including but not limited to: functionalism, rationalization, conflict theory, cultural studies, feminism, and intersectionality).The course then examines contemporary issues affecting US and international educational systems, considers proposed reforms, and discussed alternatives to schooling. In addition to weekly written assignments, students will complete a secondary data analysis project related to an educational topic of their choice.
1564 EDUC-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3481 EDUC-400-90 Senior Research Seminar 1.00 SEM Douglas, Daniel M: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This seminar is open to senior Educational Studies majors only.
  To fulfill the senior exercise requirement, students carry out an independent research project that builds upon acquired skills and evolving interests. The weekly seminar provides a thematic focus as well as a continuous forum for both support and critical feedback from peers, in preparation for a public presentation of the student’s work at the end of the semester. Each year, the seminar will be organized around a broad theme in educational studies.
1565 EDUC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3593 ENGL-104-01 This American Experiment, Pt 1 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM MH - 203 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: This is the same course as ENGL 104. Introduction to American Literature - I. Students may not receive credit for both courses.
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The America we know today has always been an experiment, defined by conflicts over land, debates about communal purpose and meaning, and the struggles of people born here and who dreaded or dreamed of coming here. This course emphasizes literary texts that have shaped-and contested-narratives of what America is and who it's for. From Indigenous stories and colonists' journals to the revolutionary texts of the new United States, from the writings of Transcendentalists and anti-slavery activists to the literature of the civil war and an abandoned Reconstruction, the works in this survey challenge students to reckon with the American present by reading and writing about its literary roots. (This course is first in a two-part sequence; students may take one part or both.)
3594 ENGL-104-02 This American Experiment, Pt 1 1.00 LEC Wyss, Hilary TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM HAM - 100DNG Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: This is the same course as ENGL 104. Introduction to American Literature - I. Students may not receive credit for both courses.
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The America we know today has always been an experiment, defined by conflicts over land, debates about communal purpose and meaning, and the struggles of people born here and who dreaded or dreamed of coming here. This course emphasizes literary texts that have shaped-and contested-narratives of what America is and who it's for. From Indigenous stories and colonists' journals to the revolutionary texts of the new United States, from the writings of Transcendentalists and anti-slavery activists to the literature of the civil war and an abandoned Reconstruction, the works in this survey challenge students to reckon with the American present by reading and writing about its literary roots. (This course is first in a two-part sequence; students may take one part or both.)
1430 ENGL-110-01 Inventing English Literature 1.00 LEC MacConochie, Alex MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM HHN - 104 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the survey requirement.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  NOTE: This is the same course as ENGL 110. Survey of English Literature I: Anglo Saxon Period to 1700. Students may not receive credit for both courses.
  Fifteen hundred years ago, there was no such thing as English literature. The few examples of writing we have from that period are in a language that hardly anyone understands today. And yet, by the time of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, England had developed one of the great world literatures. How did this happen? Starting with early masterpieces like Beowulf (in translation), we will trace the emergence of "English literature," as we now know it. In addition to major figures like Chaucer, Milton, and Shakespeare, we'll consider authors who fill out the historical picture.
3729 ENGL-110-90 Inventing English Literature 1.00 LEC Wheatley, Chloe MW: 11:55AM-1:35PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  NOTE: This is the same course as ENGL 110. Survey of English Literature I: Anglo Saxon Period to 1700. Students may not receive credit for both courses.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the survey requirement.
  Fifteen hundred years ago, there was no such thing as English literature. The few examples of writing we have from that period are in a language that hardly anyone understands today. And yet, by the time of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, England had developed one of the great world literatures. How did this happen? Starting with early masterpieces like Beowulf (in translation), we will trace the emergence of "English literature," as we now know it. In addition to major figures like Chaucer, Milton, and Shakespeare, we'll consider authors who fill out the historical picture.
2676 ENGL-252-01 Young Adult Literature 1.00 LEC Truman, James MW: 6:15PM-7:55PM HHN - 104 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  According to Philip Pullman, “There are some themes, some subjects, too large for adult fiction; they can only be dealt with adequately in a children’s book.” What themes and subjects might these be? What are the implications of this argument? We will read children’s and young adult literature from the 19th-century to the present day, discussing, as we go, its origins, evolutions, and continuities.
3715 ENGL-253-01 American Conscience 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM MH - 203 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-253-01
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 10 seats reserved for sophomores.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Conscience can be the inner voice of an individual; it can also be the shared voice of a society's commitment to certain norms--sometimes the same norms an individual feels driven by conscience to defy. Questions of conscience therefore involve central issues of literary study: How does individual expression interact with cultural context? How is content (what is moral?) mediated and modulated by the form of its representation (what is "my conscience" telling me?). This course explores key episodes in US history when authors and activists--from Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry David Thoreau to Ida B. Wells and Martin Luther King--have mobilized the written word to awaken readers' consciences or reshape a collective conscience.
1873 ENGL-260-90 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Benedict, Barbara TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
  View syllabus
1874 ENGL-260-91 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston, Sarah MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
3730 ENGL-260-92 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Wheatley, Chloe MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
2495 ENGL-260-93 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Rosen, David TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  Why study literature? A practical reason: we live in a world of words and this course helps you master that world. But more importantly, literature immerses you in vast new worlds that become more meaningful as you become a better reader. Literature grapples with the fundamental problems of humanity; good, evil, pain, pleasure, love, death. We will read across centuries of English literature, in all genres, to see how great authors have addressed these problems. Through a sustained and rigorous attention to your own writing and interpretive skills, the course will leave you better prepared to explore and contribute to the written world. This course offers skills required for the English major, but welcomes anyone who wishes to become a better writer, reader, and thinker.
1867 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey, Elizabeth WF: 2:00PM-3:40PM LIB - 181 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: 3 seats are reserved for juniors, 5 seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 2 seats for incoming InterArts first year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1604 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey, Elizabeth WF: 3:55PM-5:35PM LIB - 181 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: 3 seats are reserved for juniors, 5 seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 2 seats for incoming InterArts first year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3735 ENGL-270-90 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Gerkensmeyer, Sarah MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 10 seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 2 seats for incoming InterArts first-year student.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3764 ENGL-270-91 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Masuga, Katy TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: 10 seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 2 seats for incoming InterArts first-year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3585 ENGL-279-90 Lockdown and Escape Stories 1.00 LEC Benedict, Barbara TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  What does it feel like to be shuttered up for days or months or years? How do characters find a mental release from monotony and fear? This course explores literary representations of the experience of confinement--whether on an island, in a cellar, or in a castle--and the ways individuals escape, successfully or not. The course will enable students to explain, analyze and judge literary texts, and to express their own responses in polished and persuasive prose. Students will write analyses of the texts, and may choose to write personal narratives, poems or songs about their experiences of COVID-19 "sheltering at home." The class will include class discussion and reading aloud via Zoom, collaborative and break-out exercises, and lectures and videos posted on Moodle.
  View syllabus
3167 ENGL-331-01 Lit of Native New England 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM SH - N128 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-331-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This seminar is research intensive.
  Before it was New England, this was Native space. From the Wampanoags to the Mohegans, Narragansetts and Pequots, diverse Algonquian communities imbued their physical space with their own histories, traditions, and literatures. With the arrival of English settlers, Native Americans became active participants in a world deeply invested in writing and written traditions, and they marked their presence through English colonial written forms while maintaining a longstanding commitment to their own communities and lifeways. In this course we will explore the great variety of writing by and about Native Americans in this region: we will look at the long tradition of Native American literary presence in New England, from English language texts to other forms of cultural expression. The course is research intensive. Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
1609 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan M: 2:00PM-5:15PM 123VS - 106 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3169 ENGL-348-90 Women Writers of Middle Ages 1.00 LEC Fisher, Sheila TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This seminar is research-intensive.
  This course will study works in a variety of genres, from the lyric and the romance to the autobiography and the moral treatise, written by medieval women in England, Europe, and Asia. In addition to analyzing the texts themselves, we will be examining them within their social, historical, and political contexts as we discuss such issues as medieval women's literacy, education, and relationships to the male-authored literary traditions of their cultures. Through the term, we will be trying to determine the degree to which we can construct a recognizable woman's literary tradition for this period. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
2452 ENGL-352-01 Shakespeare 1.00 LEC MacConochie, Alex MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM 123VS - 106 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
  Through close study of a variety of Shakespeare’s works and analysis of selected performances on video, this course addresses definitions of the Shakespearean and examines the constitution of Shakespearean theater. The course pays particular attention to the coherence of Shakespearean dramas around vivid patterns of imagery, to the psychology and arts of Elizabethan and Jacobean characterization, to representations of Elizabethan social and political hierarchies, and to British Renaissance poetic will synthesizing Classical, Medieval, and Celtic source materials. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700 This course is research intensive.
3587 ENGL-368-90 Literature of Trauma&Resilienc 1.00 SEM Goldman, Francisco MW: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  In this course we explore a literature of fear that responds to traumatic events that we experience collectively and individually, from the nightmare world of the great plagues, contemporary and all the way back to ancient Athens; to the mass cruelties of war, slavery, violent repression and campaigns of terror (wartime bombings, genocides, femicides, "disappearances"); and to the experience of devastating personal loss that so many experience in their lives. This is both a heroic and an intimate literature, that answers at times overwhelming horror with our seemingly most humble yet enduring tool, words; sometimes of pain and grief, shared with others; also, variously, of resistance, memory, refuge, resilience and imaginative transformation.
3171 ENGL-383-90 Modern British Fiction 1.00 LEC Rosen, David R: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
  This is a course in British fiction between 1890 and 1945. The prose (novels and stories) of this period is characterized by tremendous ambition, radical experimentation, the questioning of old conventions and the creation of new ones. Authors will include Wilde, Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, and Beckett. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
1576 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2101 ENGL-401-90 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR Cross-listing: ENGL-801-90
  NOTE: English 401 and English 801 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
1523 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3174 ENGL-468-90 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel W: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-868-90, ENGL-868-90
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This seminar is research intensive.
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets -- not all of them American -- who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 468-06 and English 868-16 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
1605 ENGL-492-01 Fiction Workshop 1.00 SEM Ferriss, Lucy MW: 11:55AM-1:35PM HAM - 100ACA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, Theater and Dance 305, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of the class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of fiction. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student fiction, with some attention to examples of contemporary short stories. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
1606 ENGL-494-01 Poetry Workshop 1.00 SEM Rossini, Clare F: 2:00PM-5:15PM 123VS - 106 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, Theater and Dance 305, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of poetry. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student work, with some attention to examples of contemporary poetry. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
3568 ENGL-496-90 Sem: What You Should Have Read 1.00 SEM Fisher, Sheila TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is open to senior English majors only.
  This is your final year as an English major. There are books and authors, that, once upon a time, you thought every English major should have read. You still haven't. One of this seminar's purposes is to let you to do so. One of its other purposes is to ask and answer the question: Why? Why did you think that every English major should have read this book? Why hadn't you? Why has or hasn't the text met your great expectations? We will also be discussing related issues such as canonicity and canon changes, the structure of the English major, and the reasons why you chose it. The students will generate (and debate) the reading list and syllabus. The instructor will generate the requirements.
1529 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
2126 ENGL-498-90 Sr Thesis Part 1/Sr Colloquim 2.00 SEM Bilston, Sarah MW: 11:55AM-1:10PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors the techniques of research and analysis needed for writing a year-long essay on a subject of their choice. It is intended to help the students to write such year-long theses, and to encourage them to do so. It will deal with problems such as designing longer papers, focusing topics, developing and limiting bibliographies, working with manuscripts, using both library and Internet resources, and understanding the uses of theoretical paradigms. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write two-semester, year-long theses. Please refer to the department's website for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2100 ENGL-801-90 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR Cross-listing: ENGL-401-90
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3175 ENGL-868-90 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel W: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-868-90, ENGL-468-90
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets -- not all of them American -- who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 468-06 and English 868-16 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
1474 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1476 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
1625 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1911 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
1475 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
3466 ENGR-110-01 Engr Computation & Analysis 1.00 LEC Fixel, Deborah MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM LSC - 134 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-110-90
  This course introduces computational engineering analysis using programming languages MATLAB, C/C++, and FORTRAN. Programming techniques for numerical analysis and simulation will be emphasized through utilization of loops, arrays, logic controls, functions, and procedures. Programming projects will include solving linear equations, designing games, image processing, estimation and prediction.
3636 ENGR-110-90 Engr Computation & Analysis 1.00 LEC Fixel, Deborah MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-110-01
  This course introduces computational engineering analysis using programming languages MATLAB, C/C++, and FORTRAN. Programming techniques for numerical analysis and simulation will be emphasized through utilization of loops, arrays, logic controls, functions, and procedures. Programming projects will include solving linear equations, designing games, image processing, estimation and prediction.
3684 ENGR-221-01 Digital Circuits & Systems Lec 1.00 LEC Cancelled Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 126 or 131, or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to the design of digital computers. Course content includes: binary information representation, Boolean algebra, combinational circuits, sequential machines, flip-flops, registers, counters, memories, programmable logic, and computer organization. This course meets the Writing Part II requirement for the engineering major.
3686 ENGR-221-20 Digital Circuits & Systems Lab 0.25 LAB Cheng, Lin T: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 342 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 126 or 131, or permission of instructor.
  The laboratory emphasizes the design of digital networks
3687 ENGR-221-21 Digital Circuits & Systems Lab 0.25 LAB Cheng, Lin R: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 342 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 126 or 131, or permission of instructor.
  The laboratory emphasizes the design of digital networks
3685 ENGR-221-90 Digital Circuits & Systems Lec 1.00 LEC Cheng, Lin TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 126 or 131, or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to the design of digital computers. Course content includes: binary information representation, Boolean algebra, combinational circuits, sequential machines, flip-flops, registers, counters, memories, programmable logic, and computer organization. This course meets the Writing Part II requirement for the engineering major.
1026 ENGR-225-01 Mechanics I 1.00 LEC Byers, Clayton MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 134 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-225-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L or Physics 141L and Mathematics 132.
  NOTE: .
  This introductory course in mechanics studies particle and rigid body statics. Topics include: force systems, rigid body equilibrium, analysis of structures, distributed forces, friction, and the method of virtual work. Dynamics of particles and non-constant acceleration is introduced. Engineering design is incorporated in computer oriented homework assignments.
3727 ENGR-225-02 Mechanics I 1.00 LEC Byers, Clayton MWF: 6:15PM-7:05PM LSC - 134 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-225-91
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L or Physics 141L and Mathematics 132.
  This introductory course in mechanics studies particle and rigid body statics. Topics include: force systems, rigid body equilibrium, analysis of structures, distributed forces, friction, and the method of virtual work. Dynamics of particles and non-constant acceleration is introduced. Engineering design is incorporated in computer oriented homework assignments.
3637 ENGR-225-90 Mechanics I 1.00 LEC Byers, Clayton MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-225-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L or Physics 141L and Mathematics 132.
  This introductory course in mechanics studies particle and rigid body statics. Topics include: force systems, rigid body equilibrium, analysis of structures, distributed forces, friction, and the method of virtual work. Dynamics of particles and non-constant acceleration is introduced. Engineering design is incorporated in computer oriented homework assignments.
3728 ENGR-225-91 Mechanics I 1.00 LEC Byers, Clayton MWF: 6:15PM-7:05PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-225-02
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L or Physics 141L and Mathematics 132.
  This introductory course in mechanics studies particle and rigid body statics. Topics include: force systems, rigid body equilibrium, analysis of structures, distributed forces, friction, and the method of virtual work. Dynamics of particles and non-constant acceleration is introduced. Engineering design is incorporated in computer oriented homework assignments.
2217 ENGR-301-01 Signal Proc & Applications 1.25 LEC Cancelled Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 231 and Engineering 212L.
  This course presents digital signal processing (DSP) fundamentals and their practical applications through laboratory assignments. Topics include signal representations in continuous-time and discrete-time domains, discrete-time linear systems and their properties, the Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, the Z-transform, and digital filter design. This course includes laboratory experiments designed to reinforce DSP theory and to expose students to modern digital signal processing techniques, e.g., creating special audio effects, power spectrum estimation, encoding and decoding touch-tone signals, synthesizing musical instruments, frequency selective filtering, and image processing. Students gain a solid theoretical background in DSP and master hands-on applications using modern development tools.
2218 ENGR-301-20 Signal Proc & Applications 1.25 LAB Cancelled Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 231 and Engineering 212L.
  This course presents digital signal processing (DSP) fundamentals and their practical applications through laboratory assignments. Topics include signal representations in continuous-time and discrete-time domains, discrete-time linear systems and their properties, the Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, the Z-transform, and digital filter design. This course includes laboratory experiments designed to reinforce DSP theory and to expose students to modern digital signal processing techniques, e.g., creating special audio effects, power spectrum estimation, encoding and decoding touch-tone signals, synthesizing musical instruments, frequency selective filtering, and image processing. Students gain a solid theoretical background in DSP and master hands-on applications using modern development tools.
3670 ENGR-301-80 Signal Proc & Applications 1.25 LAB Ning, Taikang W: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 231 and Engineering 212L.
  This course presents digital signal processing (DSP) fundamentals and their practical applications through laboratory assignments. Topics include signal representations in continuous-time and discrete-time domains, discrete-time linear systems and their properties, the Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, the Z-transform, and digital filter design. This course includes laboratory experiments designed to reinforce DSP theory and to expose students to modern digital signal processing techniques, e.g., creating special audio effects, power spectrum estimation, encoding and decoding touch-tone signals, synthesizing musical instruments, frequency selective filtering, and image processing. Students gain a solid theoretical background in DSP and master hands-on applications using modern development tools.
3669 ENGR-301-90 Signal Proc & Applications 1.25 LEC Ning, Taikang M: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 231 and Engineering 212L.
  This course presents digital signal processing (DSP) fundamentals and their practical applications through laboratory assignments. Topics include signal representations in continuous-time and discrete-time domains, discrete-time linear systems and their properties, the Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, the Z-transform, and digital filter design. This course includes laboratory experiments designed to reinforce DSP theory and to expose students to modern digital signal processing techniques, e.g., creating special audio effects, power spectrum estimation, encoding and decoding touch-tone signals, synthesizing musical instruments, frequency selective filtering, and image processing. Students gain a solid theoretical background in DSP and master hands-on applications using modern development tools.
3087 ENGR-311-01 Electrophysiology of the CNS 1.00 LEC Blaise, J. Harry TR: 7:50AM-9:05AM MH - 203 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC, PSYC Cross-listing: ENGR-311-90
  This introductory course in cellular neurophysiology presents a modern and important body of knowledge in a highly integrated fashion drawing from the contributions of anatomists, physiologists, and electrical engineers. The basic biochemical properties of the membrane and sensory transduction, neural transmission, and synaptic interaction are considered in sequential order. Then the collective action of neurons in the form of compound electrical responses, and the electroencephalogram are discussed as means of understanding the neural circuitry involved in various behavioral modalities such as sleep-walking oscillation, pain modulation, etc. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental design. Ongoing research studies illustrating the concepts and techniques presented in the course will be discussed. Open to all junior and senior life science and physical science majors.
3655 ENGR-311-90 Electrophysiology of the CNS 1.00 LEC Blaise, J. Harry TR: 7:50AM-9:05AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC, PSYC Cross-listing: ENGR-311-01
  This introductory course in cellular neurophysiology presents a modern and important body of knowledge in a highly integrated fashion drawing from the contributions of anatomists, physiologists, and electrical engineers. The basic biochemical properties of the membrane and sensory transduction, neural transmission, and synaptic interaction are considered in sequential order. Then the collective action of neurons in the form of compound electrical responses, and the electroencephalogram are discussed as means of understanding the neural circuitry involved in various behavioral modalities such as sleep-walking oscillation, pain modulation, etc. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental design. Ongoing research studies illustrating the concepts and techniques presented in the course will be discussed. Open to all junior and senior life science and physical science majors.
2633 ENGR-325-01 Mechanics of Materials 1.25 LEC Cancelled Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
  This course studies solid mechanics of deformable bodies, focusing on the internal effects of externally applied loads. Topics include elasticity theory, stress, strain and Young's modulus, axial, torsional, and shear stresses, Mohr's circle, analysis of beams, shafts, and columns subjected to axial, torsional, and combined loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) is used throughout the course. Laboratory projects focus on the design of structures.
2634 ENGR-325-20 Mechanics of Materials 1.25 LAB Mertens, John M: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 19 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-325-80
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
  This course studies solid mechanics of deformable bodies, focusing on the internal effects of externally applied loads. Topics include elasticity theory, stress, strain and Young's modulus, axial, torsional, and shear stresses, Mohr's circle, analysis of beams, shafts, and columns subjected to axial, torsional, and combined loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) is used throughout the course. Laboratory projects focus on the design of structures.
3672 ENGR-325-80 Mechanics of Materials 1.25 LAB Mertens, John M: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ENGR-325-20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
  This course studies solid mechanics of deformable bodies, focusing on the internal effects of externally applied loads. Topics include elasticity theory, stress, strain and Young's modulus, axial, torsional, and shear stresses, Mohr's circle, analysis of beams, shafts, and columns subjected to axial, torsional, and combined loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) is used throughout the course. Laboratory projects focus on the design of structures.
3671 ENGR-325-90 Mechanics of Materials 1.25 LEC Palladino, Joseph TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
  This course studies solid mechanics of deformable bodies, focusing on the internal effects of externally applied loads. Topics include elasticity theory, stress, strain and Young's modulus, axial, torsional, and shear stresses, Mohr's circle, analysis of beams, shafts, and columns subjected to axial, torsional, and combined loading. Finite-element analysis (FEA) is used throughout the course. Laboratory projects focus on the design of structures.
2623 ENGR-341-90 Architectural Drawing 1.00 LEC Duncan, David W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: AHIS-364-90
  Hand drafting (and some freehand drawing) to teach techniques required in architectural practice, including basic floor plans, exterior views and perspectives. Classwork throughout the semester and discussions of basic architectural design principles and construction techniques is intended to prepare students for the JTerm Architectural Design Studio. Please note that enrollment in the JTerm Studio is not a requirement to take this course.
3088 ENGR-353-01 Biomechanics 1.00 LEC Cancelled Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
  This biomedical engineering core course applies principles of engineering mechanics in the examination of human physiological systems, such as the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Topics are drawn from biosolid and biofluid mechanics, including non-Newtonian fluid rheology and viscoelastic constitutive equations; and biodynamics, such as blood flow, respiratory mechanics, gait analysis and sport biomechanics. Students are exposed to current applied biomechanics research in industry and medicine.
3649 ENGR-353-90 Biomechanics 1.00 LEC Palladino, Joseph TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
  This biomedical engineering core course applies principles of engineering mechanics in the examination of human physiological systems, such as the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Topics are drawn from biosolid and biofluid mechanics, including non-Newtonian fluid rheology and viscoelastic constitutive equations; and biodynamics, such as blood flow, respiratory mechanics, gait analysis and sport biomechanics. Students are exposed to current applied biomechanics research in industry and medicine.
3089 ENGR-372-01 Heat Transfer 1.25 LEC Mertens, John TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM MECC - 220 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to the physical phenomena associated with heat transfer. Analytical and empirical techniques to study heat transfer by conduction, forced and free convection, and radiation are presented. Heat equations developed for applied conduction are solved numerically via digital computer. Students will apply design and analysis of heat transfer systems that combine conduction, convection, and radiation.
3090 ENGR-372-20 Heat Transfer 1.25 LAB Mertens, John W: 2:00PM-4:40PM MECC - 19 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to the physical phenomena associated with heat transfer. Analytical and empirical techniques to study heat transfer by conduction, forced and free convection, and radiation are presented. Heat equations developed for applied conduction are solved numerically via digital computer. Students will apply design and analysis of heat transfer systems that combine conduction, convection, and radiation.
3674 ENGR-372-80 Heat Transfer 1.25 LAB Cancelled Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to the physical phenomena associated with heat transfer. Analytical and empirical techniques to study heat transfer by conduction, forced and free convection, and radiation are presented. Heat equations developed for applied conduction are solved numerically via digital computer. Students will apply design and analysis of heat transfer systems that combine conduction, convection, and radiation.
3673 ENGR-372-90 Heat Transfer 1.25 LEC Cancelled Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to the physical phenomena associated with heat transfer. Analytical and empirical techniques to study heat transfer by conduction, forced and free convection, and radiation are presented. Heat equations developed for applied conduction are solved numerically via digital computer. Students will apply design and analysis of heat transfer systems that combine conduction, convection, and radiation.
1536 ENGR-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Independent research supervised by a faculty member in an area of the student’s special interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1631 ENGR-399-01 Ind Study-Robot Team 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Independent research supervised by a faculty member for students participating on the Robot Team. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1589 ENGR-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1423 ENGR-483-01 Capstone Design I 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: Senior engineering majors only, C- or better in ENGR200, or permission of instructor
  A research and design project, supervised by a member of the engineering faculty, that integrates knowledge from mathematics, science, and engineering courses taken for the major. Students must choose an area of study, survey the literature, determine feasibility, complete the design, and plan for implementation. Working either individually or as members of a team, students will submit full project documentation to the faculty supervisor and deliver a final oral presentation to the department. Normally elected in the fall semester. May not be taken concurrently with Engineering 484.
3656 ENGR-483-90 Capstone Design I 1.00 SEM Palladino, Joseph TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: Senior engineering majors only, C- or better in ENGR200, or permission of instructor
  A research and design project, supervised by a member of the engineering faculty, that integrates knowledge from mathematics, science, and engineering courses taken for the major. Students must choose an area of study, survey the literature, determine feasibility, complete the design, and plan for implementation. Working either individually or as members of a team, students will submit full project documentation to the faculty supervisor and deliver a final oral presentation to the department. Normally elected in the fall semester. May not be taken concurrently with Engineering 484.
1566 ENGR-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3608 ENVS-112-01 Introduction to Earth Science 1.00 LEC Gourley, Jonathan TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM MC - AUD Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first year students.
  The course will introduce students to the basic principles of geology, such as rock and mineral identification, the interpretation of the geological record, and the theory of plate tectonics. These principles will allow us to reconstruct the Earth’s history, to interpret sedimentary records in terms of environmental change, and to assess the impact of human activity on the Earth system. Additional topics include volcanoes and igneous rocks, sedimentary environments, the Earth’s climatic history, the formation of mountain ranges and continents, and an introduction to the Earth’s interior. Two one-day field trips focus on the local geology and the various rock types found within the state.
3609 ENVS-112-20 Introduction Earth Science LAB 0.25 LAB Gourley, Jonathan T: 2:00PM-4:40PM MC - 121 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Introduction Earth Science LAB
3610 ENVS-112-21 Introduction Earth Science LAB 0.25 LAB Gourley, Jonathan R: 2:00PM-4:40PM MC - 121 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Introduction Earth Science LAB
3720 ENVS-112-22 Introduction Earth Science LAB 0.25 LAB Gourley, Jonathan M: 2:00PM-4:40PM MC - 121 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  Introduction Earth Science LAB
3156 ENVS-141-01 Globl Pers Biodiversty&Conserv 1.00 LEC Pitt, Amber MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM AAC - GOODTH Y GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC Cross-listing: BIOL-141-01
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-years, 4 seats for sophomores, 2 for juniors, 2 for seniors.
  This lecture and discussion course focuses on the current biodiversity crisis. We will discuss biological diversity and where it is found and how it is monitored, direct and indirect values of biodiversity, and consequences of biodiversity loss. Topics of discussion will also include the problems of small populations, the politics of endangered species, species invasions and extinctions, and the role of humans in these processes, design and establishment of reserves, captive breeding, and the role that the public and governments play in conserving biological diversity. Not creditable to the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. This course is not open to students who have already received a C- or better in Biology 233 (Conservation Biology).
1381 ENVS-375-01 Methds in Environmentl Science 1.25 LEC Bazilio, Arianne MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM CT - 308 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Science 149L and Chemistry 111L.
  A field-oriented, problem-based course covering data collection and analysis methods commonly used to conduct environmental assessments and to solve environmental problems. This course includes methods for risk assessment, land management and land use history determination, habitat analysis, bio-monitoring, soil composition analysis, soil and water chemistry analysis, and GIS mapping. A strong emphasis is placed upon research design, data manipulation, and statistical analysis, and students are required to complete significant work outside the classroom. As a culminating exercise, students prepare a final report that integrates all the topics and techniques learned throughout the course and that addresses the focal problem. This course is not open to first year students.
1382 ENVS-375-20 Methds in Environmentl Science 1.25 LAB Bazilio, Arianne W: 2:00PM-4:40PM MC - 115 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Science 149L and Chemistry 111L.
  A field-oriented, problem-based course covering data collection and analysis methods commonly used to conduct environmental assessments and to solve environmental problems. This course includes methods for risk assessment, land management and land use history determination, habitat analysis, bio-monitoring, soil composition analysis, soil and water chemistry analysis, and GIS mapping. A strong emphasis is placed upon research design, data manipulation, and statistical analysis, and students are required to complete significant work outside the classroom. As a culminating exercise, students prepare a final report that integrates all the topics and techniques learned throughout the course and that addresses the focal problem. This course is not open to first year students.
1448 ENVS-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1449 ENVS-405-01 Internship in Env Science 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course allows students to meet the integrating experience requirement for the environmental science major through an approved integrated internship. Students who wish to use an internship toward the major must have their integrated internship contract approved by the Environmental Science Program director before the internship is begun. All students undertaking approved internships will be required to keep a detailed log of their activities, prepare a final written report and make an oral presentation of their work to the Environmental Science Program staff and students in order to complete the internship credit.
1459 ENVS-419-01 Research in Env Science Libr 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students will conduct library research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing this type of independent study should plan on a full semester culminating with the completion of a final formal paper. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1450 ENVS-425-01 Research in Env Science Lab 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan on initiating the work no later than the fall of the senior year, and should also plan on no less than two semesters of study with a final formal report to be submitted to the staff. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1451 ENVS-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1468 ENVS-497-01 Honors Research 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  An extended paper on the subject of the student's two-semester research project with a professor in environmental science, to be read by three or more members of the program. This course is open only to those environmental science majors who wish to qualify for honors (See paragraph on honors in environmental science in the description of the major). Simultaneous enrollment in Environmental Science 419 or 425 during the spring semester of senior year, submission of the special registration form available in the Registrar's Office, and approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1644 FILM-201-90 Basic Filmmaking 1.00 SEM Bemiss, Jeffrey TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: Contact co-director Professor Spezialetti for permission to enroll.
  A hands-on introduction to filmmaking from the perspectives of the director and editor. By designing and executing a series of short, creative production projects, students will explore how moving image techniques are used to structure meaning. Topics include composition, videography, sound, continuity editing, montage, and dramatic structure. Cameras and software are provided, and significant collaborative work is required.
3463 FILM-228-90 Acting for the Screen 1.00 STU Sledge, Terrell TR: 2:00PM-3:50PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: THDN-228-90
  Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 5 spaces reserved for first-year students; 4 for sophomores, 3 for juniors, and 2 for seniors.
  Through monologues, exercises, scene study, and individual and group work, students will experience acting for the camera. Exploring both the history and techniques of film acting, they will learn strategies that bring their on-screen performances to life. There will be required viewings, readings, as well as response and research papers.
3399 FILM-247-90 Otherness in Italian Cinema 1.00 SEM di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: LACS-247-90, ITAL-247-90
  NOTE: 1 seat reserved for first year students.
  From its beginnings in the early 20th C to the present, Italian Cinema has represented the social and cultural identity of the 'other' and 'otherness', that is, racial, ethnic, and sexual diversity. This course will study the representation of the different kinds of diversity in Italian film, from Neorealism to recent Italian cinema. We will examine films that deal with immigration and the current refugee crisis in the Mediterranean, but also with LGBT culture and other human rights, as well as with Italians' attitudes toward diverse groups and cultures. How does Italian film historically reflect the 'other' in Italian culture and how is film being shaped by diversity? Films include: "Paisà" (Rossellini, 1946), "Una giornata particolare" (Scola, 1977), "Mine vaganti" (Ozpetek, 2010), "Terraferma" (Crialese, 2011).
3647 FILM-319-01 The Woman's Film 1.00 SEM Corber, Robert W: 6:15PM-9:30PM SH - S201 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: WMGS-319-01
  In the 1930s Hollywood created a new genre, the woman’s picture or “weepie,” designed specifically for female audiences. This course examines the development of this enormously popular genre from the 1930s to the 1960s, including important cycles of women’s pictures such as the female gothic and the maternal melodrama. It pays particular attention to the genre’s exploration of female sexuality and its homoerotic organization of the look. It also considers the genre’s role in the formation of contemporary theories of female spectatorship. Film screenings include both versions of Imitations of Life, These Three, Stage Door, Blonde Venus, Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Rebecca, Suspicion, Gaslight, The Old Maid, Old Acquaintance, The Great Lie, Letter from an Unknown Woman, All that Heaven Allows, and Marnie. Readings by Doane, Williams, Modleski, de Lauretis, Jacobs, and White.
3558 FILM-335-90 Screenwriting 1.00 SEM Bemiss, Jeffrey TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one of the following courses or permission of instructor: FILM 201, ENGL 265, ENGL 270.
  NOTE: Please e-mail Professor Madalene Spezialetti for permission to enroll.
  This course constitutes a comprehensive introduction to the art of screenwriting. The course draws heavily on the history of the cinema and exemplary films and scripts will be examined to understand their aesthetics and craft. Starting with the basic principles of story structure, the course proceeds through a series of exercises and workshops designed to develop the skills needed to create compelling stories, complex characters, dramatic and comic dialogue, and a fully-imagined diegetic world.
2820 FILM-350-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber, Robert T: 6:15PM-9:30PM SH - S201 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL Cross-listing: WMGS-345-01
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.
1567 FILM-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1383 FILM-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2030 FILM-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and program director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
1638 FILM-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and program director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3411 FORG-201-90 Form Org & Mkt Behavior 1.00 SEM Thomas, Signe W: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course will consider the likely behavior within Formal Organizations using the benchmark of economic thinking and market mechanisms. The course will discuss the role of prices, property, and profit and loss in a market economy, and it will ponder to what extent such arrangements might be applied within firms. It will discuss potential problems of organization when concerns for opportunity cost, economic calculation, or entrepreneurial thinking are lacking. Students will read classic and modern economic texts and then read business case studies to explore when and where the lessons of economics might apply.
2478 FORG-272-01 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM SH - N215 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: ITAL-272-01, LACS-272-01
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
1649 FORG-302-01 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 1.00 SEM Curtis, Michael W: 2:00PM-4:40PM SH - N128 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  An examination of the scholarship of creating value in the economy. There will discussions of the primary literature and case studies which include non-profits and governments as well as private enterprises. There will also be visits by several successful entrepreneurs. Each student will participate in creating a business plan that combines elements of the theory with a proposal for innovation. The seminar is intended to be helpful to a student of any major which is anticipating creative projects after graduation. Limited to juniors or seniors. There are no prerequisites as to courses but almost all students will have basic economics. Discuss this with the instructor if you are uncertain of your preparation. This seminar fulfills the track for an emphasis in entrepreneurship which is an option in the Formal Organizations Minor. Each student should bring a suggested entrepreneurial project. This section will illustrate entrepreneurship by using examples from current environmental-enterprise opportunities. Several places are reserved for students with a concentration in the environmental sciences. See instructors for admission pins. As much as ½ the class is held open for Environmental Science and other Engineering and Science Majors.
2431 FORG-302-02 Seminar in Entrepreneurship 1.00 SEM Curtis, Michael W: 6:15PM-8:45PM SH - N128 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  An examination of the scholarship of creating value in the economy. There will discussions of the primary literature and case studies which include non-profits and governments as well as private enterprises. There will also be visits by several successful entrepreneurs. Each student will participate in creating a business plan that combines elements of the theory with a proposal for innovation. The seminar is intended to be helpful to a student of any major which is anticipating creative projects after graduation. Limited to juniors or seniors. There are no prerequisites as to courses but almost all students will have basic economics. Discuss this with the instructor if you are uncertain of your preparation. This seminar fulfills the track for an emphasis in entrepreneurship which is an option in the Formal Organizations Minor. Each student should bring a suggested entrepreneurial project. This section will illustrate entrepreneurship by using examples from current environmental-enterprise opportunities. Several places are reserved for students with a concentration in the environmental sciences. See instructors for admission pins. As much as ½ the class is held open for Environmental Science and other Engineering and Science Majors.
3149 FORG-310-01 Theory & Philosophy of Markets 1.00 SEM Stringham, Edward W: 2:00PM-4:40PM SH - N215 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Why are some nations rich and some nations poor? Why are some brimming with entrepreneurship and economic activity and others are not? To what extent or when should markets be considered immoral or moral? Building off of the economic ideas of the first famous economist, Adam Smith, this course will discuss the potential importance, or pitfalls, of institutions, private property rights, and contracts for economic innovation.The course will focus on the formal and informal organizations that underpin and help support exchange. Students will also focus on writing a case study of a formal or informal organization designed to advance economic activity. The course will be reading-intensive and discussion-based.
2240 FORG-315-01 Prohibitions 1.00 SEM Alcorn, John MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM SH - N215 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This seminar tackles two questions: Why do we outlaw some consensual behaviors by adults? And should we? Our common work will focus on prohibitions against lifestyles, markets,international migration, and making and taking life. Topics in contested lifestyles are recreational drug use and free marriage.Topics in contested markets are sex, adoption, organs for transplantation, secrecy (blackmail), and wagering on political predictions. Topics in contested ways of making and taking life are genetic engineering, abortion, and assisted suicide. Students will conduct policy debates about various prohibitions. We will devote several weeks towards the end of the semester to individual (or small-group) research projects by students. The research projects may be about topics we have covered or about other prohibitions.
2078 FORG-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Obtain registration form from the Registrar's Office.
2986 FORG-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2759 GHHG-101-01 Global Health Humanities Intro 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM SH - N217 Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is open only to students in the Global Health Humanities Gateway
  NOTE: This course is open only to students in the Global Health Humanities Gateway
  This course will introduce students to questions in the field linking the study of health and wellness with the study of the human conditions in fields of the humanities, such as literature and philosophy, gender and human rights, art and education, religion and environment. We will investigate how health and the practice of medicine is part of a broader understanding of what it means to care for ourselves and others and to promote wellness and the dignity of individuals and communities in ways that have both local and global implications. Students will gain insight into the various approaches to global health-related issues, such as exploring the experiences of disability, death, caregiving, wellness, and healing practices that inform scientific and medical research and practices.
3313 HIST-100-01 Modern Britain Since 1750 1.00 LEC Regan-Lefebvre, Jennifer TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM MH - 214A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course surveys the profound and continuous ways in which Britain changed over the course of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries: in terms of its boundaries, political system, population, economy, and culture. In 1750 ‘Britain’ refers to an agrarian state composed of three countries, with a powerful monarchy, limited democracy and a growing empire. By 1900 Britain has become a United Kingdom, a highly industrialised and urbanised state with a massive empire and a broadening democratic system; by 2000, it has ‘lost’ its empire but is profoundly globalised and democratic. Why, when and how did these changes happen? This class will be as interactive lectures with particular time will be set aside for class discussions and analysis of primary sources.
3738 HIST-116-01 The Rise & Fall of Roman Rep 1.00 LEC Higgins, John MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM HHN - 104 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSICS Cross-listing: CLCV-116-01
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students.
  By about 300 BCE the Roman state had in place its republican institutions, and began the expansionist process by which the Romans came to control the Mediterranean basin. Four hundred years later, the Roman empire extended from Britain to Egypt, but the state running that empire had undergone fundamental social, political, and cultural changes. This course traces the processes that created the empire and transformed the Roman world, with special emphasis on the interplay of political and social phenomena. We will look closely at primary sources on which our knowledge of these changes is based.
3315 HIST-128-01 Islamic Civilization to 1517 1.00 LEC Antrim, Zayde WF: 10:00AM-11:40AM SH - S204 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, MIDDLEAST Cross-listing: HIST-128-90
  This course investigates the emergence of an Islamic civilization that influenced large parts of the Afro-Eurasian world from the lifetime of the Prophet Muhammad in the early seventh century through the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the fifteenth. Major topics include the formation and contestation of Islamic religious and political authority; shifting geographies of and expectations for Muslim rule; experiences of women, non-Muslims, and slaves; and trends in literature, the sciences, art and architecture, and urban life. Through a mix of scholarly articles and primary sources, special attention will be paid to the methodological challenges facing historians of this period.
3602 HIST-128-90 Islamic Civilization to 1517 1.00 LEC Antrim, Zayde WF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS, MIDDLEAST Cross-listing: HIST-128-01
  This course investigates the emergence of an Islamic civilization that influenced large parts of the Afro-Eurasian world from the lifetime of the Prophet Muhammad in the early seventh century through the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the fifteenth. Major topics include the formation and contestation of Islamic religious and political authority; shifting geographies of and expectations for Muslim rule; experiences of women, non-Muslims, and slaves; and trends in literature, the sciences, art and architecture, and urban life. Through a mix of scholarly articles and primary sources, special attention will be paid to the methodological challenges facing historians of this period.
3322 HIST-203-01 Urban Nightlife since 1964 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM HHN - 104 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: URST-203-01
  NOTE: Seat reservations: 8 First-Year Students, 7 Sophomores, and 6 Juniors
  Dance music scenes and their urban spaces are social arenas in which discriminatory norms of sexism, homophobia, racism, class elitism and ethnocentrism can be subverted and transformed. Using studies of New York City, Chicago, Berlin, London, Philadelphia, and Rio de Janeiro, we examine urban nightlife's music scenes from the mid-1960s to the present, highlighting the roles played by the evolution of social liberation movements, capitalism and international migrations. We explore innovative research in Critical Race Studies, Queer Studies, Feminist Studies, and Urban Studies that has recast nightlife as far more than banal entertainment and debauchery, viewing it instead as a force propelling broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
3316 HIST-204-90 Central Am. Immigration to US 1.00 LEC Euraque, Dario MW: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  This course will survey the history of immigration patterns from the five countries of Central America to the U.S. between the early 19th century and the current decade in the context of Latin American history. The countries that will be surveyed are: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. The methodological emphasis in the lectures will be comparative.
3718 HIST-207-90 Law & Govt in Medieval England 1.00 LEC Elukin, Jonathan MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course will study the evolution of English law and government in the Middle Ages from the Norman Conquest to the Stuarts. It will emphasize key concepts of common law, the nature of English kingship, the development of Parliament, the status of particular groups in English society, the evolution of governmental power, as well as some comparative material from other medieval states. The course will be taught from primary source materials with supplementary readings from secondary scholarship. Qualifies for credit in the Formal Organizations minor.
3688 HIST-209-01 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM SH - N128 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-209-90, AMST-209-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3713 HIST-209-90 African-American History 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-209-90, HIST-209-01
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3690 HIST-217-90 History of Modern Europe 1.00 LEC Kassow, Samuel TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course focuses on an examination of the evolution of European society from the 18th to the 20th centuries, with particular attention to the French and Industrial revolutions. Students study not just the history but also the historiography of such vital questions as the origin of modern ideologies, the development of mass politics, imperialism and its causes, the impact of the Russian Revolution, and the course of the modern "Thirty Years War" (1914-1945). There will be extensive consideration of differences and similarities in the transition of various European states from 'tradition' to 'modernity.' Students will also examine the relevance of such terms as 'totalitarianism' and 'modernization' to historical study.
3641 HIST-219-01 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM 123VS - 106 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 11 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS Cross-listing: HIST-219-90
  NOTE: 7 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for History majors, 2 seats for ENVS majors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3340 HIST-219-02 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM MC - AUD Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 11 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS Cross-listing: HIST-219-91
  NOTE: 7 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for History majors, 2 seats for ENVS majors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3642 HIST-219-90 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS Cross-listing: HIST-219-01
  NOTE: 2 seats reserved for History Majors, 2 seats for ENVS majors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3613 HIST-219-91 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 12:40PM-1:45PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ENVS Cross-listing: HIST-219-02
  NOTE: 2 seats reserved for History Majors, 2 seats for ENVS majors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3318 HIST-223-01 Japan into the Mod World 1.00 LEC Bayliss, Jeffrey WF: 2:00PM-3:40PM LIB - 206 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-223-90
  Counts as one of the survey courses for the two-semester history sequence for the Asian Studies major. This course examines the social, economic, and cultural transformations that occurred in Japan from its initial encounter with Western modernity through its rise to military superpower status in the first half of the 20th century. Students will gain a greater understanding of the problems that have shaped Japan, by exploring the challenges, conflicts, triumphs, and tragedies of modernization, industrialization, and nation-building as the Japanese experienced them in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course concludes with a detailed exploration of the road to the Pacific War and the social, political, and cultural effects of mobilization for total war followed by total defeat.
3614 HIST-223-90 Japan into the Mod World 1.00 LEC Bayliss, Jeffrey WF: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-223-01
  Counts as one of the survey courses for the two-semester history sequence for the Asian Studies major. This course examines the social, economic, and cultural transformations that occurred in Japan from its initial encounter with Western modernity through its rise to military superpower status in the first half of the 20th century. Students will gain a greater understanding of the problems that have shaped Japan, by exploring the challenges, conflicts, triumphs, and tragedies of modernization, industrialization, and nation-building as the Japanese experienced them in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course concludes with a detailed exploration of the road to the Pacific War and the social, political, and cultural effects of mobilization for total war followed by total defeat.
3319 HIST-241-01 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM SH - N129 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS Cross-listing: HIST-241-90
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
3615 HIST-241-90 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MWF: 10:00AM-11:05AM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS Cross-listing: HIST-241-01
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
3616 HIST-256-90 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Euraque, Dario TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, LATINAMER Cross-listing: INTS-256-90
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
3342 HIST-318-90 Gender&Sexuality in ME History 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde F: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MIDDLEAST Cross-listing: INTS-321-90, WMGS-321-90
  NOTE: For Fall 2020, this course will be taught as a tutorial. Students will meet in pairs with the instructor to discuss weekly reading and writing assignments. Meetings may be scheduled outside of the time block listed above.
  Through theoretical readings, historical monographs, ethnographies, novels, and films, this course explores changing discourses of gender and sexuality among Muslims in the Middle East from the foundational period of Islam to the present. Major topics include attitudes toward the body, beauty, and desire; social and legal norms for marriage, divorce, and reproduction; intersections between gender, sexuality, imperialism, and nationalism; and contemporary debates about homosexuality and women's rights.
3665 HIST-324-90 From Civil Rights to #BLM 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl R: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, MNOR Cross-listing: AMST-324-90
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  Have we entered a new civil rights era? What are this new movement's goals? Who are these new activists and what political beliefs motivate them? How did we get here? This seminar tries to answer these questions by looking backward. Both the strategies and the political analyses of the Movement for Black Lives are rooted in the successes - and failures - of the civil rights movements of the past. We will study the twentieth century's "Long Civil Rights Movement" and consider both continuities and breaks between past and present struggles for racial justice.
3307 HIST-329-90 The Holocaust 1.00 SEM Kassow, Samuel TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This seminar will study major topics in the history of the Holocaust and focus on perpetrators, bystanders and victims. Special attention will be given to historiographical controversies.
3308 HIST-332-90 South Africa/Anti-Apartheid Mv 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MW: 6:15PM-7:30PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  The creation of the apartheid state in South Africa gave birth to a litany of sociopolitical movements aimed at dismantling a system of white minority rule. In what ways can a digital archive open up a window onto this rich and dynamic history of the anti-antiapartheid movement in South Africa between 1948 and 1994? This course will seek to answer this question by primarily utilizing Aluka's "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa", a collection of over 190,000 primary and secondary sources that shed considerable light on how marginalized peoples and communities sought to realize a democratic alternative to settler colonialism during the era of decolonization in Africa. Topics such as political leadership, nonviolent civil disobedience, coalition building, state repression, armed guerilla resistance, nationalism, international solidarity and truth and reconciliation will inform the ways in which we search for sources of historical evidence contained in Aluka's digital archive.
3360 HIST-350-90 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-850-90, AMST-450-90
  This course is not open to first-year or sophomore students without instructor consent.
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
3243 HIST-356-01 Germany and the Great War 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM SH - S205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: HIST-356-90, LACS-356-90
  The outbreak of World War I marks the end of Germany's long nineteenth century and the beginning of a chaotic twentieth century. Its defeat in the war ushered in a period of remarkable social progress, scientific and artistic achievement, as well as unprecedented political instability, which led to some of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century. This course will examine Germany's entry into the war to its defeat and aftermath. With focus on the totality of the experience of this war in German and Austro-Hungarian regions, we will explore important historical works, primary documents, novels, films, works of art and more. Taught in English.
3484 HIST-356-90 Germany and the Great War 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: LACS-356-90, GRMN-356-90
  The outbreak of World War I marks the end of Germany's long nineteenth century and the beginning of a chaotic twentieth century. Its defeat in the war ushered in a period of remarkable social progress, scientific and artistic achievement, as well as unprecedented political instability, which led to some of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century. This course will examine Germany's entry into the war to its defeat and aftermath. With focus on the totality of the experience of this war in German and Austro-Hungarian regions, we will explore important historical works, primary documents, novels, films, works of art and more. Taught in English.
1568 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1569 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2673 HIST-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1 & Seminar 2.00 SEM Bayliss, Jeffrey W: 6:15PM-8:45PM SH - N130 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A two-semester senior thesis including the required research seminar in the fall term. Permission of the instructor is required for Part I.
3261 HMTS-114-01 Heroes in Antiquity 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  In the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, Hercules, Achilles, Odysseus, Aeneas, and Jesus were heroic archetypes: of strength, of passion, of mind, of duty, and of wisdom. Our primary focus in this course will be investigating how ancient texts construct these characters as "heroes," as well as how and why these characters and their narratives differ from one another. Readings may include the Shield of Herakles, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the New Testament. We will also compare these ancient conceptions of heroism to our modern understandings by discussing how and why these characters are depicted in modern media, such as the films Troy (Petersen 2004) and O Brother, Where Art Thou? (Coens 2000).
3452 HMTS-114-90 Heroes in Antiquity 1.00 SEM Tomasso, Vincent MW: 11:55AM-1:10PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  In the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, Hercules, Achilles, Odysseus, Aeneas, and Jesus were heroic archetypes: of strength, of passion, of mind, of duty, and of wisdom. Our primary focus in this course will be investigating how ancient texts construct these characters as "heroes," as well as how and why these characters and their narratives differ from one another. Readings may include the Shield of Herakles, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the New Testament. We will also compare these ancient conceptions of heroism to our modern understandings by discussing how and why these characters are depicted in modern media, such as the films Troy (Petersen 2004) and O Brother, Where Art Thou? (Coens 2000).
3262 HMTS-115-01 Heroes of Biblical Literature 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y FYR2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway Program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  An examination of the crucial characters in biblical history, this course will explore the narratives surrounding Abraham, Moses, David, and Jesus. These texts will be analyzed in a historically sensitive fashion to demonstrate a series of opposing conclusions. If the distinct authorship of each story will be demonstrated, then so will thematic connections be shown to span across all four narratives. Moreover, as Abraham's elevated status balances against God's anger toward David, and Jesus' redemption reverses the Israelites' Egyptian bondage, all of these characters will be united by the unanticipated suffering that follows their election. By concentrating on such paradoxical alternations, this inquiry will seek to identify the peculiar set of characteristics that define biblical heroes and anti-heroes.
3453 HMTS-115-90 Heroes of Biblical Literature 1.00 SEM Hornung, Gabriel TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y FYR2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway Program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  An examination of the crucial characters in biblical history, this course will explore the narratives surrounding Abraham, Moses, David, and Jesus. These texts will be analyzed in a historically sensitive fashion to demonstrate a series of opposing conclusions. If the distinct authorship of each story will be demonstrated, then so will thematic connections be shown to span across all four narratives. Moreover, as Abraham's elevated status balances against God's anger toward David, and Jesus' redemption reverses the Israelites' Egyptian bondage, all of these characters will be united by the unanticipated suffering that follows their election. By concentrating on such paradoxical alternations, this inquiry will seek to identify the peculiar set of characteristics that define biblical heroes and anti-heroes.
1521 HMTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and his/her director are required for enrollment.
1989 HRST-125-01 Introduction to Human Rights 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin MW: 6:15PM-7:55PM MC - AUD Y  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: HRST-125-90
  CD:Not open to Seniors
  NOTE: Seniors will not be allowed to enroll in this class.
  This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world.
3701 HRST-125-90 Introduction to Human Rights 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin MW: 6:15PM-7:55PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: HRST-125-01
  CD:Not open to Seniors
  This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world.
3413 HRST-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM ADMIS - 301 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: POLS-332-01
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
2674 HRST-348-90 New Beginnings 1.00 SEM Dworin, Judy
Allen, Elizabeth
M: 11:15AM-1:00PM
T: 5:00PM-7:00PM
N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  In this seminar, we will investigate the application of the arts to populations with a focus on, but not limited to, urban youth at risk; those incarcerated; families affected by incarceration; and victims of crime. We will look at the role the arts and restorative justice play in a healing and rehabilitative process with these populations, analyzing the mission, goals, action steps, and results through research and hands-on experience. In conjunction with two Hartford-based nonprofit organizations, students will do a significant fieldwork project, entitled New Beginnings, that will include research, participation, and analysis.
1436 HRST-399-01 Human Rights Studies 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
2011 HRST-466-01 Human Rights Teaching Assistnt 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1551 HRST-497-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term project.
1435 HRST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester).
1422 IART-101-90 Art and Artists 1.00 SEM Preston, Michael TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A Y FYR2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is open only to students in the InterArts Program.
  How does art get made? What is the nature of the artistic process? How do emotions, themes and ideas translate into artistic form? Through readings, discussion, written reflections and art viewings, this seminar explores creativity as a dynamic process sourced in the encounter between artist and world. In addition to studying a broad range of important artists, students are encouraged to develop their imaginative and intellectual resources and to experiment with various media as they participate in creative projects that call upon the skills learned in their arts practice courses.
1531 IART-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1416 IART-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2154 IDPS-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
3553 INTS-201-01 Gender & Sexuality/Transnatl 1.00 LEC Zhang, Shunyuan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MECC - 246 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: WMGS-201-01
  This broadly interdisciplinary course provides students with an introduction to the field of gender and sexuality studies. It pays particular attention to transnational approaches. Materials are drawn from a variety of disciplines and may include films, novels, ethnographies, oral histories, and legal cases.
3196 INTS-207-90 Global South 1.00 LEC Gunasena, Natassja TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 27 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students.
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
2461 INTS-237-90 20th Cent Chinese Literature 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 22 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS Cross-listing: LACS-237-90, CHIN-237-90
  This course is a survey of twentieth-century Chinese literature and films. It focuses on the literature, cinema, and essays of three periods in the Chinese 20th century: 1918 ~ 1949; 1949 ~ 1976; since 1976. We read works of Chinese writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Zhang Ailing, Mao Dun, ShenCongwen, Yu Hua, Su Tong, etc., and watch selected films of significant cultural and historical meanings. Students are introduced to various essential issues of twentieth-century Chinese cultural modernity and are encouraged to explore in the Chinese context the key tensions between tradition and modernity, native and foreign, and nationalism and cosmopolitanism.
3564 INTS-243-90 Global African Diasporas 1.00 LEC Cancelled Y GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  This course attempts to guide students to think about how the existence of people of African descent is determined by the particularities involved in the process of enslavement, immigration, and in the construction of racial thought globally, which directly affects the formation of black identity and the black population’s tools of resistance. It additionally promotes a series of debates that will approach themes such as the participation of people of African descent in the construction of societies, demythologizing racist theories, and understanding aspects of these dynamics that make contemporary discussions around race peculiar. Also, the course intends to prepare students to denude the concepts they have about the diasporic process in the United States and understand processes that differ from it in several ways.
3374 INTS-247-90 Global Inequalities 1.00 LEC Fernandez Milmanda, Belen TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD Cross-listing: POLS-247-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for INTS majors.
  This course studies inequality in the contemporary world, its different types (wealth, income, gender, racial), its causes and consequences. We will look at inequality both in developing and developed countries as well as inequality in the world system. We will systematically analyze the economic, social and political transformations that have led to an increase in income inequality in the developed world in the last two decades, as well as the processes that have made possible a reduction of inequality in some regions of the developing world.
3617 INTS-256-90 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Euraque, Dario TR: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, LATINAMER Cross-listing: HIST-256-90
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
3197 INTS-260-01 The City in African Studies: 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth MW: 8:05AM-9:45AM VC - 101 Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST Cross-listing: URST-260-01
  Africa is a rapidly urbanizing region of the world; the most rapidly urbanizing by World Bank standards. Contemporary urbanization in Africa has stimulated new scholarship on the history of African cities, African urban economies, urban politics and urban identities, among other topics. African urban studies has produced some of the most thoughtful and engaged work on Africa to date. In this course we will be exploring major themes in the field of African urban studies to gain deeper appreciation of the history of African cities, their contemporary iterations, and their future possibilities.
2216 INTS-302-90 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Gamble, Julie T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD Cross-listing: URST-302-90, PBPL-802-90
  NOTE: Open to INTS majors only
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
2454 INTS-310-90 Queer China 1.00 SEM Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS Cross-listing: WMGS-310-90
  This course offers an interdisciplinary perspective on non-normative gendered and sexual practices in urban(izing) China and how they have been represented, embodied, and regulated across time and space. The course will introduce students to materials-textual, visual, and audio-that span more than a hundred years from late imperial China to the present against the backdrop of modernization, urbanization, and globalization. Students will explore the different methodological, thematic, and analytic approaches to genders and sexualities in literature, cultural studies, history, and ethnographies.
3586 INTS-321-90 Gender&Sexuality in ME History 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde F: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MIDDLEAST Cross-listing: WMGS-321-90, HIST-318-90
  NOTE: For Fall 2020, this course will be taught as a tutorial. Students will meet in pairs with the instructor to discuss weekly reading and writing assignments. Meetings may be scheduled outside of the time block listed above.
  Through theoretical readings, historical monographs, ethnographies, novels, and films, this course explores changing discourses of gender and sexuality among Muslims in the Middle East from the foundational period of Islam to the present. Major topics include attitudes toward the body, beauty, and desire; social and legal norms for marriage, divorce, and reproduction; intersections between gender, sexuality, imperialism, and nationalism; and contemporary debates about homosexuality and women's rights.
3438 INTS-335-90 U.S. Colonialism 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: AMST-336-90
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for INTS majors.
  What does it mean to study the United States in the world, and the world in the United States? This course considers the role of the United States within global relations of empire, capitalism, migration, and war. It also examines how U.S. domestic politics of race, gender, national identity, and social justice have evolved in relation to these transnational histories. We will explore how the existence of the U.S. nation-state is premised upon the global histories of European colonialism, indigenous displacement, and transatlantic slavery. We will analyze the cultures and consequences of U.S. empire, as well as the multiracial and transnational social movements that have contested U.S expansion. This interdisciplinary course combines historical, literary, visual, and theoretical texts.
3291 INTS-350-90 Empire, Race, & Immigration 1.00 SEM Gunasena, Natassja TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD
  This course examines the historical and contemporary relationships between race, empire, and U.S. immigration law by studying how immigration law has shaped national and imperial projects. Which immigrant groups are deemed ‘too foreign’ to become American? Which are deemed ‘assimilable’? How do such inclusions and exclusions define citizenship, and what do they have to do with the maintenance of borders and empire? These immigration laws have always been challenged, contested, and negotiated by activists. We will also examine the impact of global social movements that generate new definitions of belonging.
3522 INTS-376-90 Latin American Politics 1.00 LEC Fernandez Milmanda, Belen TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: POLS-376-90
  The course examines the processes of political, economic and social change that took place in Latin America in the XX and XIX Century. Topics include: the rise of populism and import-substituting industrialization, revolutions and revolutionary movements, the causes and consequences of military rule, the politics of economic reform, democratic transitions, the commodity boom, and the left turn. For each topic we will review classic political science theories and critically evaluate their applicability to Latin American countries. We will also discuss the lessons that can be drawn from Latin American cases for the study of these topics in the rest of the world.
1619 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1820 INTS-401-90 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth MWF: 7:35AM-8:25AM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
1555 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2064 INTS-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1388 ISP_-117-01 The Process of Discovery 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM MH - 203 Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 17 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ISP_-117-90
  This first-year seminar introduces broad scientific ideas that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. This course will examine the scientific process from the initial concept to the published result. We will examine disciplinary differences in how discoveries are made and how research is done. We will also explore writing and reporting styles and special topics such as scientific ethics and funding of research.
3445 ISP_-117-90 The Process of Discovery 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: ISP_-117-01
  This first-year seminar introduces broad scientific ideas that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. This course will examine the scientific process from the initial concept to the published result. We will examine disciplinary differences in how discoveries are made and how research is done. We will also explore writing and reporting styles and special topics such as scientific ethics and funding of research.
3451 JWST-206-90 Arab/Israeli Conflict 1.00 LEC Kiener, Ronald TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 34 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MIDDLEAST
  An examination of the dynamics of the Arab/Israeli conflict, especially since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. The course will focus on the changing interests and positions of the parties involved: Israel, the Palestinians, the Arab states, and the important international players. It will also highlight contradictions within the major camps.
1489 JWST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1572 JWST-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
2383 MATH-107-90 Elements of Statistics 1.00 LEC Babapoor, Youlanda MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  A course designed primarily for students in the social and natural sciences. Topics include graphical methods, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course is not open to students with credit for Mathematics 131 or above, or who have placed into Mathematics 207 on the Mathematic Placement Examination
3389 MATH-114-01 Judgment and Decision Making 1.00 LEC Evans, Kyle MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM LSC - 138-9 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-114-90
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101.
  In this course, we consider the application of elementary mathematical analysis to various procedures by which societies and individuals make decisions. Topics will include weighted and unweighted voting, apportionment of representatives, redistricting / gerrymandering, and game theory with a theme of understanding decision-making algorithms in the context of historic and modern politics in the United States and around the world.
3507 MATH-114-90 Judgment and Decision Making 1.00 LEC Evans, Kyle MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-114-01
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101.
  In this course, we consider the application of elementary mathematical analysis to various procedures by which societies and individuals make decisions. Topics will include weighted and unweighted voting, apportionment of representatives, redistricting / gerrymandering, and game theory with a theme of understanding decision-making algorithms in the context of historic and modern politics in the United States and around the world.
2385 MATH-127-01 Functions, Graphs and Modeling 1.00 LEC Gingras, Kaitlyn MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM LSC - 138-9 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-127-90
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  This course will focus on the study of functions and graphs and their uses in modeling and applications. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the properties of linear, polynomial, rational piecewise, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Students will learn to work with these functions in symbolic, graphical, numerical and verbal form.
3508 MATH-127-90 Functions, Graphs and Modeling 1.00 LEC Gingras, Kaitlyn MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-127-01
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  This course will focus on the study of functions and graphs and their uses in modeling and applications. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the properties of linear, polynomial, rational piecewise, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Students will learn to work with these functions in symbolic, graphical, numerical and verbal form.
2377 MATH-131-01 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Mauro, David MWF: 8:30AM-9:45AM LSC - 134 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2379 MATH-131-02 Calculus I 1.25 LEC McCurdy, Matthew MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM
T: 11:15AM-12:30PM
CT - 308 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
  View syllabus
2382 MATH-131-03 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Mauro, David MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM
R: 11:15AM-12:30PM
MECC - 270 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2381 MATH-131-90 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Russo, Paula MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM
R: 11:15AM-12:30PM
N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3509 MATH-131-91 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Pellico, Ryan MWF: 8:30AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3752 MATH-131-92 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Schuerger, Houston MWF: 8:30AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3759 MATH-131-93 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Pellico, Ryan MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM
T: 11:15AM-12:30PM
N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2388 MATH-132-01 Calculus II 1.25 LEC Cancelled Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 131, or an appropriate score on the AP Examination or Trinity's Mathematics Qualifying Examination.
  Topics concerning the Riemann integral and its applications, techniques of integration, first-order ordinary differential equations, and sequences and series. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2387 MATH-132-90 Calculus II 1.25 LEC Kuenzel, Kirsti MWF: 8:30AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 131, or an appropriate score on the AP Examination or Trinity's Mathematics Qualifying Examination.
  Topics concerning the Riemann integral and its applications, techniques of integration, first-order ordinary differential equations, and sequences and series. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1040 MATH-205-01 Abstraction and Argument 1.00 LEC Sandoval, Mary MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM MECC - 246 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: This course is not recommended for distribution credit.
  This course deals with methods of proof and the nature of mathematical argument and abstraction. With a variety of results from modern and classical mathematics as a backdrop, we will study the roles of definition, example, and counterexample, as well as mathematical argument by induction, deduction, construction, and contradiction. This course is recommended for distribution credit only for non-majors with a strong mathematical background.
2389 MATH-207-01 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM MC - AUD Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON Cross-listing: MATH-207-90
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3746 MATH-207-02 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM MC - AUD Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON Cross-listing: MATH-207-91
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3510 MATH-207-90 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON Cross-listing: MATH-207-01
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3747 MATH-207-91 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with ECON Cross-listing: MATH-207-02
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2392 MATH-228-90 Linear Algebra 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132, 205, 231 or 253, or consent of instructor.
  A proof-based course in linear algebra, covering systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Students may not count both Mathematics 228 and Mathematics 229 for credit towards the Math major.
2250 MATH-229-01 Applied Linear Algebra 1.00 LEC Pellico, Ryan MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM UNASSIGNED - Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-229-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132, 205, 231 or 253, or consent of instructor.
  An introduction to linear algebra with an emphasis on practical applications and computation. Topics will be motivated by real-world examples from a variety of disciplines, for instance medical imaging, quantum states, Google’s PageRank, Markov chains, graphs and networks,difference equations, and ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics will include solvability and sensitivity of large systems, iterative methods, matrix norms and condition numbers, orthonormal bases and the Gram-Schmidt process, and spectral properties of linear operators. MATLAB will be used for coding throughout the course, although no previous experience is required. Students may not count both Mathematics 228 and Mathematics 229 for credit towards the Math major.
3511 MATH-229-90 Applied Linear Algebra 1.00 LEC Pellico, Ryan MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-229-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132, 205, 231 or 253, or consent of instructor.
  An introduction to linear algebra with an emphasis on practical applications and computation. Topics will be motivated by real-world examples from a variety of disciplines, for instance medical imaging, quantum states, Google’s PageRank, Markov chains, graphs and networks,difference equations, and ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics will include solvability and sensitivity of large systems, iterative methods, matrix norms and condition numbers, orthonormal bases and the Gram-Schmidt process, and spectral properties of linear operators. MATLAB will be used for coding throughout the course, although no previous experience is required. Students may not count both Mathematics 228 and Mathematics 229 for credit towards the Math major.
2393 MATH-231-01 Calculus III 1.25 LEC Evans, Kyle MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM
T: 11:15AM-12:30PM
SH - S201 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-231-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132.
  Vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Divergence Theorem. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
3512 MATH-231-90 Calculus III 1.25 LEC Evans, Kyle MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM
T: 11:15AM-12:30PM
N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MATH-231-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132.
  Vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Divergence Theorem. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
2394 MATH-231-91 Calculus III 1.25 LEC Sandoval, Mary MWF: 8:30AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132.
  Vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Divergence Theorem. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1899 MATH-299-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3513 MATH-309-90 Numerical Analysis 1.00 LEC McCurdy, Matthew MW: 6:15PM-7:30PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Computer Science 115, MATH 132, and any mathematics course numbered 200 or higher.
  Theory, development, and evaluation of algorithms for mathematical problem solving by computation. Topics will be chosen from the following: interpolation, function approximation, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of nonlinear equations, systems of linear equations, and differential equations. Treatment of each topic will involve error analysis.
  View syllabus
3431 MATH-326-90 Graph Theory with Applications 1.00 LEC Kuenzel, Kirsti MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 228 or C- or better in each of Mathematics 229 and either Math 205/241 or permission of instructor.
  Introduction to the theory of graphs, with applications to real world problems. Topics may include, but are not necessarily restricted to: connectivity, paths and cycles, trees as information structures, digraphs and depth-first search, stability and packing problems, matching theory and schedules, transportation networks, Max-Flow-Min-Cut Theorem, planar graphs, color ability, and the four color problem. Admission to this course is usually contingent upon a student’s having credit for Mathematics 228. Offered in alternate years.
3096 MATH-331-90 Analysis I Intro Real Analysis 1.00 LEC Skardal, Per Sebastian MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: **C- or better in Mathematics 228 or Mathematics 229 and either Math 205/241 or permission of instructor. **In addition, students must have earned a C+ or better in either Mathematics 228, 205 or 241.
  Properties of the real number system, elementary topology, limits, continuity, uniform convergence and differentiation of real-valued functions.
1490 MATH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3362 MATH-403-90 Fractal Geometry 1.00 SEM Skardal, Per Sebastian MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 228 or 229, at least one 300 level Mathematics course, Senior status.
  This course will study the emergence of fractal geometries in a variety of contexts. Fractals arising from iterated function systems, Julia and Mandelbrot sets, and strange attractors and bifurcation diagrams will be studied in detail Introductory topics from metric space analysis, complex analysis, and dynamical systems will be presented to allow for a rigorous treatment of each fractal type.
1598 MATH-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1491 MATH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Required of, but not limited to, honors candidates.
1368 MUSC-101-20 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine M: 12:55PM-1:45PM AAC - 104 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1369 MUSC-101-21 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine M: 2:00PM-2:50PM AAC - 104 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1370 MUSC-101-22 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LAB Melson, Christine W: 2:40PM-3:30PM AAC - 104 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
1041 MUSC-101-90 Basic Musicianship 1.25 LEC Price, Aaron MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Music 101 students must register for one of the practicum sessions listed below.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music.
3544 MUSC-105-58 Instrumental Ensemble 0.50 STU Curran, Nancy TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Coached by Hartford-area professionals, chamber music ensembles are formed as a result of placement auditions with the Coordinator. Every effort is made to group students with others at the same skill level. Ensembles perform at least once each semester. Ensembles repertoire includes works from Western art musical traditions as well as arrangements of popular music songs and world music traditions.
1393 MUSC-107-07 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  NOTE: Please email PKennedy@trincoll.edu for "Questionnaire and Guidelines". Attendance at a pre-registration meeting is required during the first week of classes.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3836 MUSC-107-11 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3839 MUSC-107-20 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3833 MUSC-107-25 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
1615 MUSC-107-27 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  NOTE: Please email PKennedy@trincoll.edu for "Questionnaire and Guidelines". Attendance at a pre-registration meeting is required during the first week of classes.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3837 MUSC-107-28 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3835 MUSC-107-34 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3834 MUSC-107-51 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3838 MUSC-107-55 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
3545 MUSC-107-90 Lessons 0.50 STU Kennedy, Patricia
Allen, Jennifer
TBA N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
  Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes.
1980 MUSC-108-01 Steel Pan Ensemble 0.50 STU Greenidge, Curtis MW: 7:30PM-9:00PM AAC - 102 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Students will learn the history and social significance of steel pan music in Trinidad. Additionally, students will understand the musical roles of each instrument in the ensemble and learn the techniques associated with playing each of them. Students will be expected to learn and memorize arrangements of classical, popular, and traditional calypso music. The music will be taught aurally and by rote by an instructor from Trinidad.
1394 MUSC-109-01 Jazz Ensemble 0.50 STU Allen, Jennifer TR: 7:30PM-9:00PM NONE - Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: MUSC-109-90
  NOTE: Membership is by audition. For permission, contact Jen Allen at Jennifer.Allen@trincoll.edu
  Jazz is America's own art form! The Jazz Ensemble studies and performs the compositions of Ellington, Monk, Coltrane, Hancock, and others, as well as original works by Professor Allen and the group members. Styles span the gamut of jazz history, from traditional swing to fusion and jam band funk. We will work hard on improving individually and as a group, with focus on creative improvising, group interplay, and solid grooves. There are usually two performances per semester at various venues on campus.
3797 MUSC-109-90 Jazz Ensemble 0.50 STU Allen, Jennifer TR: 7:30PM-9:00PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: MUSC-109-01
  Jazz is America's own art form! The Jazz Ensemble studies and performs the compositions of Ellington, Monk, Coltrane, Hancock, and others, as well as original works by Professor Allen and the group members. Styles span the gamut of jazz history, from traditional swing to fusion and jam band funk. We will work hard on improving individually and as a group, with focus on creative improvising, group interplay, and solid grooves. There are usually two performances per semester at various venues on campus.
2639 MUSC-111-01 Samba Ensemble 0.50 STU Galm, Eric MW: 6:00PM-7:30PM AAC - 102 Y GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, LATINAMER
  NOTE: For permission, email eric.galm@trincoll.edu and attend the first class.
  Emphasis is on the study and performance of the Brazilian samba drumming tradition. Related musical styles and musical genres are also included. Previous performance experience is not required, and students may take this course for more than one semester. Membership by permission of the instructor. Also listed under International Studies – Latin American and Caribbean.
2640 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm, Eric MW: 3:55PM-5:30PM AAC - 102 Y GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with AFRICANST, ANTH, CLIC, LATINAMER, URST
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
3272 MUSC-150-90 Before Lady Gaga and Beyoncé 1.00 LEC Woldu, Gail TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: WMGS-150-90
  A broad survey of the music and music-making traditions of European and North American women from antiquity to the present. We explore the work and lives of women active as composers and performers in a range of genres, including the classical traditions, blues, jazz, and hip hop. No previous training or experience in music is required.
2447 MUSC-201-01 Diatonic Harmonic Practice 1.50 SEM Cancelled Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or equivalent preparation.
  Study of the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, through exercises and the analysis of typical works. An intensive course with integrated practicum sessions, which focus on the development of skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard proficiency, and written exercises modeled after those works. Simultaneous enrollment in the one-hour practicum is required.
2448 MUSC-201-20 Diatonic Harmonic Practice 1.50 LAB Melson, Christine R: 3:00PM-3:50PM AAC - 104 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MUSC-201-80
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or equivalent preparation.
  Study of the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, through exercises and the analysis of typical works. An intensive course with integrated practicum sessions, which focus on the development of skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard proficiency, and written exercises modeled after those works. Simultaneous enrollment in the one-hour practicum is required.
3766 MUSC-201-80 Diatonic Harmonic Practice 1.50 LAB Melson, Christine R: 3:00PM-3:50PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: MUSC-201-20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or equivalent preparation.
  Study of the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, through exercises and the analysis of typical works. An intensive course with integrated practicum sessions, which focus on the development of skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard proficiency, and written exercises modeled after those works. Simultaneous enrollment in the one-hour practicum is required.
3765 MUSC-201-90 Diatonic Harmonic Practice 1.50 SEM Price, Aaron MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or equivalent preparation.
  Study of the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, through exercises and the analysis of typical works. An intensive course with integrated practicum sessions, which focus on the development of skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard proficiency, and written exercises modeled after those works. Simultaneous enrollment in the one-hour practicum is required.
3549 MUSC-234-90 Music as Protest 1.00 LEC Woldu, Gail TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course examines the ways in which social and political issues are expressed in music. We will look at music that was written, composed, and performed in Paris, Harlem, and Hartford in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and explore the ramifications of the social and political issues for the music. Topics to be covered include: the music of the French Revolution; music of urban black America, 1960 to the present; Hector Berlioz, Ludwig van Beethoven, Claude Debussy, and “protests” in classical music. No previous experience in music is required.
3550 MUSC-248-90 Psychology of Music 1.00 LEC Platoff, John MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with PSYC
  A broad survey of human responses to music, from the physics and psychophysics of how we perceive musical sounds to the question of how and why music is emotionally powerful. Through reading from the primary literature in both music and psychology, students will develop an understanding of the cognitive processes by which we understand music; musical meaning and the formation of musical taste; the social and cultural factors that influence musical preferences; and the similarities and differences in music across cultures. Students MUST have the ability to read music.
2428 MUSC-311-90 Music from Plato through Bach 1.00 SEM Woldu, Gail TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLASSICS, HIST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
  This course explores music from the time of Plato and Aristotle through Baroque composers Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. We will consider the most significant traditions, trends, genres, innovations, and historical developments in the history of music in Europe as we discover, listen to, and write about key works by composers whose music is the cornerstone for much of today's music.
2429 MUSC-313-90 Music-Stravinsky to John Adams 1.00 SEM Platoff, John MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 201 or permission of instructor.
  A study of contemporary art music from the late-1890s to the present, focusing on the greatest composers of the era in their historical, political, and social contexts. Composers studied will include Mahler, Debussy, Stravinsky, Bartók, Schoenberg, Shostakovich, Ives, Copland, Gershwin, Ellington, Bernstein, Reich, and Adams.
1492 MUSC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1541 MUSC-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1940 MUSC-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
3302 NESC-103-90 Adolescence and Drug Use 1.00 LEC Martinez, Luis TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 36 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Adolescence is a time of firsts, including (for many) their first experiences with drugs of abuse. This course focuses on the interaction between things that are happening within the body (e.g., hormonal changes associated with puberty, brain development) with outside factors (e.g. societal norms, peer pressure), to ultimately help explain the onset of drug use/abuse. Although this course will be approached from the human perspective, lecture and in-class discussions/activities will be informed by readings drawn from the human as well as non-human animal literature. Some understanding of basic biology and psychology is helpful, but not a prerequisite.
3618 NESC-120-01 Nervous Connections 1.00 LEC Swart, Chris TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM HAM - 100DNG Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Recent scientific research indicates that a worm has 302 neurons, snails have long-term memory, and elephants can hear through their feet. This course will draw on current research in neuroscience to explain why information about other animals is relevant to our lives. Selected readings, lectures and class discussions will provide a basic understanding of the human nervous system and how research on animal systems has yielded this knowledge. Laboratory exercises will introduce the students to nervous system anatomy and function through dissection and experimental techniques. A basic understanding of biology and chemistry will be helpful, but this course has no pre-requisites. First-year students are given preference.
3662 NESC-212-01 LandscapePlan,Environ Ed Brain 1.00 SEM Masino, Susan W: 2:00PM-5:15PM SH - N130 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: NESC-212-90, URST-212-90
  This Perspectives course will translate emerging research on brain health into landscape planning that supports the health of the planet and everyone in Connecticut's rural, suburban and urban communities. The focus will be nature-based solutions to support biodiversity and protect the climate, green infrastructure to clean our air and water and prevent flooding and heat islands, and public areas that offer refuge and quiet as well as education and recreation. Guest speakers will share their expertise in public policy, environmental law, local ecology, urban planning and environmental justice. There will be a field component and a semester-long project planning interpretive ecology stations and citizen science databases. Grading will be based on a final project, short reflective essays and research papers, and an oral exam.
3663 NESC-212-90 LandscapePlan,Environ Ed Brain 1.00 SEM Masino, Susan W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: NESC-212-01, URST-212-90
  This Perspectives course will translate emerging research on brain health into landscape planning that supports the health of the planet and everyone in Connecticut's rural, suburban and urban communities. The focus will be nature-based solutions to support biodiversity and protect the climate, green infrastructure to clean our air and water and prevent flooding and heat islands, and public areas that offer refuge and quiet as well as education and recreation. Guest speakers will share their expertise in public policy, environmental law, local ecology, urban planning and environmental justice. There will be a field component and a semester-long project planning interpretive ecology stations and citizen science databases. Grading will be based on a final project, short reflective essays and research papers, and an oral exam.
1042 NESC-301-01 Intro Neursci Method-Lab 1.00 LEC Swart, Chris
Martinez, Luis
Puljung, Michael
Seraphin, Sally
MW: 2:00PM-5:15PM LSC - B01 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: Prof. Martinez is the course coordinator. Please contact him with any questions regarding the course.
  A laboratory course that will introduce the student to current methods and techniques used in neuroscience research. The course consists of three-week rotations in the laboratories of staff members. Among the topics to be covered will be radioligand binding assays, neurochemical assays, electrophysiology, psychobiological techniques, experiments in perception, and methods in cognitive science. This course is normally taken in the junior year.
3294 NESC-312-01 Neurobiology of Movement 1.00 SEM Swart, Chris MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM AAC - 320 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in BIOL 182, 183, and NESC 201 or PSYC 261
  Animal movements are a delicate balance of neural impulses, muscle contraction, bone and connective tissue elasticity, balance, rhythm, energetics and biofeedback. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of animal muscles is important from many perspectives beyond the biological sciences. Artists and computer animators, Robotics engineers, Athletic trainers and even video security analysts study the unique signatures of individual human movement. In this course, we will study the neuromuscular control of movement. The first half of the course will be dedicated to the basic anatomy and physiology of the mammalian neuromuscular system. The second half will examine several animal models different forms of locomotion including, bipedal walking and running, quadrupedal walking and running, swimming, flying, and jumping. Prerequisites - Bio 182, 183 and Psyc 261 or Nesc 201
3539 NESC-320-90 Neuroscience across Lifespan 1.00 LEC Helt, Molly TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: PSYC-320-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Neuroscience 201 or Psychology 261
  This course will provide an overview of the developmental assembly of a complex nervous system. We will investigate the relations between developmental changes in the brain (morphology, neurochemistry, connectivity), and developmental changes in perceptual, cognitive, and social abilities (e.g., attention, executive function, empathy) throughout the lifespan. We will also address fundamental theoretical issues in the field of developmental neuroscience, such as the role of experience versus innate biological predisposition, the range of plasticity, and the functional degree of specialization in the brain. Part of this course will be devoted to gaining a better understanding of experimental methods utilized in the field of developmental neuroscience, in order to both critically analyze such studies, and, as a final paper, design your own study.
3295 NESC-325-01 Hormones and Social Behavior 1.00 SEM Martinez, Luis TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM LSC - AUD Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Neuroscience 201 or Psychology 261
  This course will examine how hormones act within the brain to ultimately influence the expression of social behaviors. We will address how hormones drive the development and function of specific brain areas, with a particular focus on sex differences in these processes. We will consider a wide range of behaviors with implications for our social lives, including sexual attraction, bonding/affiliation, aggression, and social cognition, within the context of both normative and disease states. Although this course will be approached from the human perspective, discussions will be informed by primary research conducted in both human and non-human models. Consequently, course materials will draw upon primary research articles as well as assigned readings from the text.
1828 NESC-388-01 Current Issues in Neuroscience 0.50 LEC Masino, Susan T: 2:00PM-3:15PM MC - AUD Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: Senior Neuroscience major, and a C- or better in Neuroscience 201, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Please contact Roxanne Porter for a permission number.
  This half-credit course considers current neuroscience research on topics ranging from clinical research to molecular biology. Students will attend presentations by neuroscience researchers and read and discuss pertinent research literature prior to each presentation. Some special scheduling arrangements will be necessary for activities outside of the regular class meeting time.
1452 NESC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1453 NESC-425-01 Research Neurosci-Lab 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual faculty member. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1460 NESC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3818 NESC-490-01 Research Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1454 NESC-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
2017 NESC-951-01 Independent Research 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2018 NESC-953-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  First credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2019 NESC-954-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A continuation of NESC 953. Second credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2020 NESC-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1439 PARI-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Emerson, Eleanor
Oliver, Lindsay
TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
3494 PBPL-123-01 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC DiBella, Lori T: 6:15PM-8:45PM HHN - 104 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This is a required course for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor. It is the recommended first course for students who are interested in the minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
1614 PBPL-123-90 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Horowitz, Amy W: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This is a required course for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor. It is the recommended first course for students who are interested in the minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
3717 PBPL-123-91 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Weiner, Matthew T: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This is a required course for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor. It is the recommended first course for students who are interested in the minor.
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for permission to enroll.
  NOTE: This is a required course for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor. It is the recommended first course for students who are interested in the minor.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
1421 PBPL-201-90 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Moskowitz, Rachel TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Course not open to First Year Students
  NOTE: 21 seats reserved for sophomores and 4 seats by instructor consent.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
1985 PBPL-220-90 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Moskowitz, Rachel TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201, Juniors and Seniors must be PBPL majors, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for PBPL majors
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
3782 PBPL-230-01 Legal Perspect Cities & Gov 1.00 SEM Liu, Chang W: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: URST-280-01
  Prerequisite: PBPL 123 or permission of instructor
  NOTE: This class will meet in China, at Fudan University.
  This course exposes students to the legal frameworks within which American cities and local governments operate. Through reading leading cases from various federal and state courts and writings of important urban thinkers, it explores the division of power between local, state, and federal government and evaluates the desirability of the current system in the broader context of democracy and good government. The course also examines how city decision-making is shaped by the relevant legal frameworks and in turn shapes important aspects of American life, including how racial and ethnic divisions fracture American metropolitan areas. Discussion topics include urban zoning and planning, exclusionary zonings and racial segregation, urban renewal and property rights, public schools and charter schools, and sanctuary cities and immigration.
  View syllabus
2104 PBPL-245-90 Title IX: Changing Campus Cult 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne MW: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for PBPL majors.
  This course will explore the legal and policy implications of the new Title IX federal guidelines as they apply to equity in athletics and sexual misconduct on college campuses. During the course of the term we will consider how best to devise and implement effective policies aimed at: increasing equity in college athletics; reducing incidents of sexual misconduct on college campuses; protecting the legal rights of all parties to administrative hearings; ensuring that institutions of higher education are in full compliance with new federal and state mandates. Trinity’s Title IX Coordinator, will periodically join in our class discussions.
2678 PBPL-251-90 Judicial Proc:Courts & Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Fulco, Adrienne TR: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 26 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with POLS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science102 or Public Policy and Law 201, 202, or 123, or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the evolution of the judicial process in America and the role of the courts as policy makers. We will study civil and criminal courts at both the state and federal level as well as the functions of judges, lawyers, litigants, and other actors. We will also consider how the courts make policy in areas such as the war on terrorism, the right to privacy, gay and lesbian rights, and the rights of the accused.
2801 PBPL-318-01 Privatization & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for permission to enroll.
  Governments increasingly contract or partner with the private sector to deliver public goods and services based on the theory that doing so will enhance efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Although policymakers often attend to the economics of privatization, this course explores privatization's political and social dimensions, asking: who gains and who loses when public goods and services are privatized? We will examine theories underlying privatization, evidence of its impact, and debates regarding its costs and benefits. We will study these topics through case studies of K-12 and higher education, infrastructure, housing, criminal justice systems, and other public goods and services. Throughout, we will analyze privatization's impact on equity, democracy, and the common good.
3495 PBPL-318-90 Privatization & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Castillo, Elise TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for permission to enroll.
  Governments increasingly contract or partner with the private sector to deliver public goods and services based on the theory that doing so will enhance efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Although policymakers often attend to the economics of privatization, this course explores privatization's political and social dimensions, asking: who gains and who loses when public goods and services are privatized? We will examine theories underlying privatization, evidence of its impact, and debates regarding its costs and benefits. We will study these topics through case studies of K-12 and higher education, infrastructure, housing, criminal justice systems, and other public goods and services. Throughout, we will analyze privatization's impact on equity, democracy, and the common good.
2115 PBPL-321-01 American Legal History 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM HHN - 104 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for Public Policy and Law majors.
  This course focuses on key themes in law and American history from the colonial era to the early twentieth century. Topics include the English origins of American legal institutions; land, law and Native Americans; the framing of the Constitution; the emergence of the Supreme Court; slavery, westward expansion and constitutional conflict in the new republic; the rise of corporations, railroads and modern tort law; civil rights in Reconstruction; the treatment of immigrants and labor under the law. The course analyzes landmark Supreme Court decisions but also considers legal history from the bottom up, e.g., the participation of the enslaved, free people of color and women in the legal system of the antebellum South. Previous courses in American history and an introduction to law are strongly suggested.
3705 PBPL-321-90 American Legal History 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn TR: 6:15PM-7:55PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course focuses on key themes in law and American history from the colonial era to the early twentieth century. Topics include the English origins of American legal institutions; land, law and Native Americans; the framing of the Constitution; the emergence of the Supreme Court; slavery, westward expansion and constitutional conflict in the new republic; the rise of corporations, railroads and modern tort law; civil rights in Reconstruction; the treatment of immigrants and labor under the law. The course analyzes landmark Supreme Court decisions but also considers legal history from the bottom up, e.g., the participation of the enslaved, free people of color and women in the legal system of the antebellum South. Previous courses in American history and an introduction to law are strongly suggested.
1574 PBPL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1461 PBPL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1547 PBPL-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1462 PBPL-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, availaboe in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
1864 PBPL-498-90 Thesis and Colloquium 2.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne F: 11:55AM-1:35PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is designed to teach senior Public Policy and Law majors how to write a year long honors thesis. The course is designed to provide support and structure to the process of writing a thesis. Students will formulate a research question, undertake a review of the literature, develop strategies to organize their work, and familiarize themselves with the appropriate Library and Internet sources. Students will also make oral presentations of their work. This course is required of all senior Public Policy and Law majors who are writing an honors thesis.
1829 PBPL-800-90 Principles and Practice 1.00 SEM O'Brien, Patrick M: 6:15PM-8:45PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course will focus on both micro- and macro-level elements of the public policy process, from problem identification through post-implementation evaluation. In addition to core theoretical text-based discussion, students will be exposed to models of research and reporting used in the various fields of public policy. Students will apply their learning through case-study analysis. They will be required to complete an independent research project through which they will examine a particular area of policy (e.g., healthcare, education, housing, etc.) and to analyze a specific program through one or more of the lenses discussed in class.
3429 PBPL-801-90 Community Develpmnt Strategies 1.00 SEM Delgado, Laura MW: 11:55AM-1:10PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 1 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC Cross-listing: URST-801-90, URST-301-90
  In this course we will explore the causes of neighborhood decline, examine the history, current practice and guiding policies of community development, and see firsthand selected community development strategies at work in the local communities surrounding Trinity College. We will pay close attention to the influence of ideas in good currency in the field of urban development such as smart growth, transit oriented development, land-banking and place-making. The course is organized around four questions: What are the underlying forces behind neighborhood decline? How and why did community development emerge? How has community development practice reconciled itself with current concepts that guide urban development such as new urbanism, smart growth, place-making and land-banking. What does the future hold for disinvested communities and for community development practice?
2508 PBPL-802-90 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Gamble, Julie T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: URST-302-90, INTS-302-90
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
3252 PBPL-833-01 Introduction to Urban Planning 1.00 SEM Poland, Donald W: 6:30PM-9:00PM SH - N129 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: URST-433-90, PBPL-833-90
  This course provides an overview of urban planning. Students will be introduced to key theories and concepts as well as methods and empirical case studies in this multidimensional field. Lectures and seminar discussions concentrate on applications of urban planning theories and concepts as practiced by urban planners. Topics discussed in the course may include regional, environmental, metropolitan, transportation, spatial, and land-use planning issues. Empirical emphasis is expected to be on Hartford and other Connecticut cities, but the course may discuss other American or international urban areas. The course is an elective geared toward public policy graduate students with an interest in urban policy, regardless of their track. This course may be of interest to American studies graduate students as well (permission of adviser required).
3448 PBPL-833-90 Introduction to Urban Planning 1.00 SEM Poland, Donald W: 6:30PM-9:00PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: URST-433-90, URST-833-90
  This course provides an overview of urban planning. Students will be introduced to key theories and concepts as well as methods and empirical case studies in this multidimensional field. Lectures and seminar discussions concentrate on applications of urban planning theories and concepts as practiced by urban planners. Topics discussed in the course may include regional, environmental, metropolitan, transportation, spatial, and land-use planning issues. Empirical emphasis is expected to be on Hartford and other Connecticut cities, but the course may discuss other American or international urban areas. The course is an elective geared toward public policy graduate students with an interest in urban policy, regardless of their track. This course may be of interest to American studies graduate students as well (permission of adviser required).
3290 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Candace T: 6:15PM-8:45PM SH - N217 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
2464 PBPL-860-01 Public Management 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick, Sean R: 6:15PM-8:45PM SH - N215 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: URST-860-01
  This course will survey the core principles and practices of management in the public sector. Many modern commentators have argued that public institutions must be "run like a business" to achieve its mission in an efficient and accountable way. Is this argument valid? If not, how must the management of public institutions adapt or depart from basic business principles? Course readings will focus on key elements of successful management in the public sphere, including financial and budgetary oversight, capital planning, public transparency and inclusion, and workforce management. Students will engage with course material through a series of short essays or policy memoranda, an independent research project analyzing the management of an individual public institution or agency, and making recommendations for enhancements to its management structure and practices.
  View syllabus
1477 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1478 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1479 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
1497 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
1480 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
2467 PHED-112-10 Beginning Tennis 0.25 LAB Shulman, Lori TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM AEXTER - TCENTER Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction will concentrate on the fundamental tennis strokes: forehand, backhand, serve, and volley. Knowledge of rules, game procedures, and tennis etiquette will be emphasized. Racquets available.
3631 PHED-112-11 Beginning Tennis 0.25 LAB Shulman, Lori TR: 11:10AM-12:50PM AEXTER - TCENTER Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction will concentrate on the fundamental tennis strokes: forehand, backhand, serve, and volley. Knowledge of rules, game procedures, and tennis etiquette will be emphasized. Racquets available.
3560 PHED-121-01 Recreational Running/Walking I 0.25 LAB Barney, Heather MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM AEXTER - TCENTER Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Guided and structured introduction to recreational running, with the aim of increasing cardiovascular fitness and continuous run time. Stretching and mobility for running health will also be covered.
3561 PHED-121-02 Recreational Running/Walking I 0.25 LAB Garner, Emily TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM UNASSIGNED - Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Guided and structured introduction to recreational running, with the aim of increasing cardiovascular fitness and continuous run time. Stretching and mobility for running health will also be covered.
3562 PHED-122-01 Rec Running/Walking II 0.25 LAB Suitor, George MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM UNASSIGNED - Q2
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Once you've completed walking/running , continue your training with section II of the course. Continue to work towards your fitness goals with a little more intensity in your workouts. The course will build on the base level fitness through the first five weeks and increase the intensity as your endurance and cardio level increase.
3563 PHED-122-02 Rec Running/Walking II 0.25 LAB Suitor, George TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM UNASSIGNED - Q2
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Once you've completed walking/running , continue your training with section II of the course. Continue to work towards your fitness goals with a little more intensity in your workouts. The course will build on the base level fitness through the first five weeks and increase the intensity as your endurance and cardio level increase.
2367 PHED-124-10 Fitness I 0.25 LAB Dissinger, Kathryn MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM FAC - FIT Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction for a beginning fitness and conditioning program. It will involve proper warm-up and stretching techniques, cardiovascular training involving heart rates, and an introduction to safe and effective strength training. It will include basic concepts of anatomy and physiology.
2371 PHED-124-12 Fitness I 0.25 LAB Tarnow, Jason TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM FAC - FIT Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction for a beginning fitness and conditioning program. It will involve proper warm-up and stretching techniques, cardiovascular training involving heart rates, and an introduction to safe and effective strength training. It will include basic concepts of anatomy and physiology.
2370 PHED-131-10 Golf 0.25 LAB Adamski, Bryan MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM UNASSIGNED - Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction to grip, stance, and basic swing. Course etiquette, rules, and procedures taught; instruction with each club regarding its special use and technique for its particular shot. Golf clubs available.
2372 PHED-131-11 Golf 0.25 LAB Adamski, Bryan TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM UNASSIGNED - Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction to grip, stance, and basic swing. Course etiquette, rules, and procedures taught; instruction with each club regarding its special use and technique for its particular shot. Golf clubs available.
3643 PHED-151-90 Nutrition/Sport Performance 0.50 LAB MacDermott, Kevin
Mason, John Michael
MW: 10:00AM-11:49AM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  A full-semester (Q1 and Q2) exploration of historical approaches to fueling for sport, examination of current trends in sports nutrition science and practical exercise of creating an individualized sports-nutrition program.
3795 PHED-152-01 Coaching Seminar 0.50 SEM Cosgrove, James TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM LIB - 181 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 13 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHED-152-90
  Primarily for students who anticipate the possibility of coaching in private school. An in-depth study of fundamentals, staff organization, practice planning, and different coaching philosophies and styles.
3644 PHED-152-90 Coaching Seminar 0.50 SEM Cosgrove, James TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHED-152-01
  Primarily for students who anticipate the possibility of coaching in private school. An in-depth study of fundamentals, staff organization, practice planning, and different coaching philosophies and styles.
3648 PHED-153-90 Intro to Sports Psychology 0.50 LAB Rathbun, Molly TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Introduction to Sports Psychology is a general overview on techniques and strategies to improve mental wellness in life and sport. Subject matter will include, but is not limited to: Focus & Awareness, Mindfulness, Emotional Regulation, Imagery, Motivation, Confidence, Self-Talk, Goal Setting, Meditation, and Routines & Habits. All of these techniques can be applied by all in everyday situations and is a great way to foster mindset development to aid in physical, mental, and emotional growth.
3645 PHED-155-90 Outdoor Leadership I 0.50 LAB Johnson, Kevin MW: 1:45PM-3:25PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course will develop competent student leaders using field experiences to study effective leadership practices. This course will engage students in discussions and practical experiences focused on leadership skills necessary to effectively lead in the outdoor field. Student leaders will work to develop their personal leadership skills through a series of lectures, labs, and group activities. This course will culminate with a final field-based expedition where students will plan, facilitate, and lead each other. Leadership topics will be taught in three categories including: Hard Skills, Soft Skills, and Meta Skills.
3423 PHED-224-20 Fitness II 0.25 LAB Dissinger, Kathryn MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM FAC - FIT Q2
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction towards a more sophisticated conditioning program. A continuation of stretching and cardiovascular fitness, but more advanced training techniques and principles will be introduced including goal-setting and individual sport specific programs.
3424 PHED-224-21 Fitness II 0.25 LAB Tarnow, Jason TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM FAC - FIT Q2
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Instruction towards a more sophisticated conditioning program. A continuation of stretching and cardiovascular fitness, but more advanced training techniques and principles will be introduced including goal-setting and individual sport specific programs.
3097 PHIL-101-90 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Antich, Peter MWF: 11:20AM-12:25PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first years
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3761 PHIL-104-01 Intro to Critical Theory 1.00 LEC Vogt, Erik T: 6:15PM-9:30PM HAM - 100DNG Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course provides a comprehensive introduction into one of the most important and consequential philosophical approaches in 20th century European philosophy: Critical Theory (also known as "Frankfurt School"). Critical Theory constituted the attempt by a group of brilliant Jewish-German philosophers to account for and critically respond to the political, philosophical, and artistic disaster of National Socialism. The most prominent members of Critical Theory were Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, and Herbert Marcuse. We will read and interrogate some of the seminal texts such as "The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility", "The Concept of History", "Dialectic of Enlightenment" , and "One-Dimensional Man".
3098 PHIL-205-90 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
3518 PHIL-217-01 Philosophy and Literature 1.00 LEC Vogt, Erik M: 6:15PM-9:30PM HAM - 100DNG Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  We shall study a number of philosophic works with literary significance and a number of literary works with philosophic content in order to raise the question of what the difference is between the two. This course may be used to fulfill the Literature and Psychology minor requirements.
3100 PHIL-221-90 Science, Reality & Rationality 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Much of modern philosophy has focused on efforts to understand the rise of physical science since the 16th century. This course will focus on 20th-century efforts by philosophers to characterize science, explain its effectiveness, and interpret its findings.
3101 PHIL-222-01 Existentialism 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale M: 2:00PM-5:15PM SH - N128 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  A study of the philosophical background of existentialism and of a number of principal existentialistic texts by such writers as Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Camus, and Sartre.
3700 PHIL-228-01 Animal Rights, Human Respons 1.00 LEC Ewegen, Shane W: 2:00PM-5:15PM CT - CINESTUDIO Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Who is the animal? In an effort to explore this and related questions this course will serve as a philosophical investigation into the essence of non-human animals. Major philosophical and political theories regarding the status, value, and autonomy of non-human animals will be explored. Additional efforts will be made to address the discourse of animal rights, animal husbandry, and animal suffering, as well as broader issues of human rights insofar as they relate to and affect the non-human animal. Through a philosophical inquiry into the nature of animality, we will see that our understanding of animals bears immediately upon our understanding of the human being and of human rights. Thus, the question ‘who is the animal’ will lead us directly into the most pressing of philosophical questions – who is the human being?
3102 PHIL-241-01 Race Racism & Phil 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM CT - 308 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  An intensive examination of some philosophical discussions of race and racism. Topics include the origins of European racism, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic racism, the conceptual connections between racist thinking and certain canonized philosophical positions (e.g., Locke’s nominalism), the relationship between racism and our notions of personal identity, the use of traditional philosophical thought (e.g., the history of philosophy) to characterize and explain differences between European and black African cultures, the possible connections between racism and Pan-Africanism, the nature of anti-Semitism, and recent attempts to conceptualize race and racism as social constructions.
3103 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM HHN - 104 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST, PBPL
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
3104 PHIL-281-01 Ancient Greek Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen, Shane TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM CT - CINESTUDIO Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 23 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for PHIL majors
  This course looks at the origins of western philosophy in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Students will see how philosophy arose as a comprehensive search for wisdom, then developed into the “areas” of philosophy such as metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3105 PHIL-288-90 Modern Philosophy 1.00 LEC Antich, Peter MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for PHIL majors
  This course will provide a survey of 18th century European philosophy; to be more precise, we will examine texts by representatives of both French and German Enlightenment thought. The first section of the course will focus on Rousseau's and Diderot's contributions to political and aesthetic thought; the second section will be concerned with Kant's epistemology and with some of his shorter texts on political and aesthetic thought. The goal of this course consists in both defining Enlightenment thought and unearthing the fateful dialectic at its very heart. Methodologically, this course will employ an approach owed to the tradition of Critical Theory. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3605 PHIL-311-90 Philosophy of Medicine 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is a general survey of philosophy of medicine and epidemiology. After covering some preliminaries from medicine's history, we will ask: what is health? Is it an individual or collective good? What is disease? How does medicine demarcate healthy and diseased conditions? Are health and disease natural kinds or are they socially constructed? What is the relationship between medicine and biomedical science, and how do they explain? What is epidemiology, and how is it distinct from medicine? How are epidemiological models constructed, and what kind of information do they provide? Finally we will consider the role that values and socioeconomic forces play in medicine, epidemiology, and biomedical science, and how these fields might address social inequities in health outcomes.
3107 PHIL-334-01 Critical Theory 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This seminar will provide a survey of the major texts and figures of the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse etc.). We will pay particular attention to their interrogations of philosophy and politics, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and philosophy and art.
3412 PHIL-341-01 Philosophy and Revolution 1.00 SEM Vogt, Erik M: 2:00PM-5:15PM HAM - 100DNG Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course will critically examine debates in European philosophy regarding the conjunction of philosophical discourses and ideas of radical (democratic) politics in the context of those socioeconomic, technological, and cultural conditions that are constitutive of the contemporary version of a brave new world. Readings from Alain Badiou, Judith Balso, Slavoj Zizek, Jodi Dean, Jacques Rancière, Antonio Negri, Gianni Vattimo, Susan BuckMorss and others. Conversance with the post-19th century European philosophical tradition and political theory is desirable, but not required.
3108 PHIL-374-90 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd, Dan TR: 9:20AM-10:35AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
3109 PHIL-374-91 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd, Dan TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
1573 PHIL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Independent, intensive study in a field of special interest requiring a wide range of reading and resulting in an extended paper. Normally there will be only a few meetings with the supervisor during the course of the semester. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1493 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1548 PHIL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. To be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending the first semester, and two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
1617 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.
3502 PHYS-141-90 Physics I - Mechanics 1.25 LEC Walden, Barbara MWF: 10:00AM-11:50AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Math 131, or concurrent enrollment. Students may not earn credit for both Physics 101 and Physics 141.
  NOTE: 20 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course is the first part of a three-term calculus-based introduction to physics for students intending to major in physics or one of the physical sciences. It is taught in an interactive studio format, which emphasizes collaborative problem solving, hands-on experimentation, and data analysis. This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of the language and the analytical tools of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics, forces, conservation laws, work and energy, momentum, gravity, and rigid-body motion. Time permitting, the course will conclude with the study of the first two laws of thermodynamics and their application to the prototypical thermodynamics system, the ideal gas. Three two-hour class meetings per week. The laboratory is integrated into the course.
  View syllabus
3504 PHYS-141-91 Physics I - Mechanics 1.25 LEC Reid, Austin MWF: 2:00PM-3:50PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Math 131, or concurrent enrollment. Students may not earn credit for both Physics 101 and Physics 141.
  NOTE: 20 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course is the first part of a three-term calculus-based introduction to physics for students intending to major in physics or one of the physical sciences. It is taught in an interactive studio format, which emphasizes collaborative problem solving, hands-on experimentation, and data analysis. This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of the language and the analytical tools of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics, forces, conservation laws, work and energy, momentum, gravity, and rigid-body motion. Time permitting, the course will conclude with the study of the first two laws of thermodynamics and their application to the prototypical thermodynamics system, the ideal gas. Three two-hour class meetings per week. The laboratory is integrated into the course.
  View syllabus
3498 PHYS-232-01 Phys III:Optics & Modern Phys 1.00 LEC Branning, David MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM SH - N129 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHYS-232-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 231L and either Mathematics 132 or 142, with concurrent registration in Mathematics 231 strongly recommended.
  NOTE: The lab portion of this course will be offered in the spring.
  Concluding the three-term calculus-based introductory physics sequence, this course begins with the study of interference and diffraction, which provide compelling evidence for the wave nature of light. We then turn to geometrical optics to understand the properties of lenses, mirrors, and optical instruments. The remainder of the course is devoted to the treatment of phenomena at the atomic and subatomic levels using the ideas of quantum physics. From the introduction of the photon, the Bohr atom, and de Broglie’s matter waves, we proceed to the unified description provided by Schrodinger’s wave mechanics. This is used to understand basic properties of atoms, beginning with hydrogen, and to describe the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and matter. As time permits, the course will include a brief introduction to the theory of special relativity and to nuclear physics.
3499 PHYS-232-90 Phys III:Optics & Modern Phys 1.00 LEC Branning, David MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHYS-232-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 231L and either Mathematics 132 or 142, with concurrent registration in Mathematics 231 strongly recommended.
  NOTE: The lab portion of this course will be offered in the spring
  Concluding the three-term calculus-based introductory physics sequence, this course begins with the study of interference and diffraction, which provide compelling evidence for the wave nature of light. We then turn to geometrical optics to understand the properties of lenses, mirrors, and optical instruments. The remainder of the course is devoted to the treatment of phenomena at the atomic and subatomic levels using the ideas of quantum physics. From the introduction of the photon, the Bohr atom, and de Broglie’s matter waves, we proceed to the unified description provided by Schrodinger’s wave mechanics. This is used to understand basic properties of atoms, beginning with hydrogen, and to describe the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and matter. As time permits, the course will include a brief introduction to the theory of special relativity and to nuclear physics.
3207 PHYS-304-01 Statistical & Thermal Physics 1.00 LEC Palandage, Kalum MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - N217 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHYS-304-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L or Physics 141L and Mathematics 132.
  This course provides an intermediate-level presentation of basic principles of statistical physics with applications to scientific inference, stochastic phenomena, and thermodynamics. Classical thermodynamics describes the equilibrium properties and phase transformations of macroscopic physical systems in terms of relations independent of any atomic model of matter. Statistical physics, by contrast, provides a fundamental theoretical foundation for the thermodynamic relations in terms of the specific statistical laws obeyed by the elementary particles of matter and general considerations of probability theory. Together, thermodynamics and statistical physics provide the tools for studying the behavior of aggregates of particles far too numerous to be analyzed by solving directly the equations of motion of either classical or quantum mechanics. Among the concepts, systems, and processes to be discussed are heat, work, temperature, pressure, energy, entropy, chemical potential, chemical equilibria, gases, liquids, solids, solutions, neutron stars, and fluctuation phenomena (not necessarily in that order and subject to time constraints).
3500 PHYS-304-90 Statistical & Thermal Physics 1.00 LEC Palandage, Kalum MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHYS-304-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L or Physics 141L and Mathematics 132.
  This course provides an intermediate-level presentation of basic principles of statistical physics with applications to scientific inference, stochastic phenomena, and thermodynamics. Classical thermodynamics describes the equilibrium properties and phase transformations of macroscopic physical systems in terms of relations independent of any atomic model of matter. Statistical physics, by contrast, provides a fundamental theoretical foundation for the thermodynamic relations in terms of the specific statistical laws obeyed by the elementary particles of matter and general considerations of probability theory. Together, thermodynamics and statistical physics provide the tools for studying the behavior of aggregates of particles far too numerous to be analyzed by solving directly the equations of motion of either classical or quantum mechanics. Among the concepts, systems, and processes to be discussed are heat, work, temperature, pressure, energy, entropy, chemical potential, chemical equilibria, gases, liquids, solids, solutions, neutron stars, and fluctuation phenomena (not necessarily in that order and subject to time constraints).
3208 PHYS-313-01 Quantum Mechanics 1.00 LEC Walden, Barbara MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM LSC - 134 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHYS-313-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 232L.
  A thorough study of the general formalism of quantum mechanics together with some illustrative applications, including the postulates of quantum mechanics; states, observables, and operators; measurements in quantum mechanics; the Dirac notation; simple systems: the square well, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom; approximation techniques and perturbation theory; and elements of the quantum theory of angular momentum.
  View syllabus
3501 PHYS-313-90 Quantum Mechanics 1.00 LEC Walden, Barbara MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
    Cross-listing: PHYS-313-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 232L.
  A thorough study of the general formalism of quantum mechanics together with some illustrative applications, including the postulates of quantum mechanics; states, observables, and operators; measurements in quantum mechanics; the Dirac notation; simple systems: the square well, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom; approximation techniques and perturbation theory; and elements of the quantum theory of angular momentum.
  View syllabus
1467 PHYS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1443 PHYS-405-01 Senior Exercise 0.50 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is open only to senior Physics majors.
  This exercise is intended to familiarize the student with a problem of current interest in physics, and to develop his or her ability to gather and interpret the information relevant to the problem. During the fall semester each senior student will meet with an assigned faculty adviser to plan an essay or research project to be completed during the year. Topics may involve any aspects of physics, including its various applications. While students may write on original research they have undertaken, they are not required to do so. This exercise is required for the physics major.
1556 PHYS-490-01 Research Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3722 POLS-102-90 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Manento, Cory TR: 7:25AM-9:05AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 9 seats reserved for sophomores.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3760 POLS-102-91 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 21 seats reserved for first-year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3119 POLS-103-90 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Messina, Anthony MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 9 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats for sophomores, 2 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course introduces the study of comparative politics which is a subfield of political science. More specifically, it introduces many of the key concepts and theoretical approaches that have been adopted in comparative politics and surveys the political institutions and politics of select foreign countries. Students of comparative politics primarily focus on the political processes and institutions within countries (whereas students of international relations primarily, but not exclusively, study interactions among countries). Inspired by current world events and puzzles, comparativists investigate such major questions as: Why are some countries or regions more democratic than others? How do different countries organize their politics, i.e., how and why do their political party systems, electoral rules, governmental institutions, etc. differ?
3514 POLS-104-90 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Funk, Kevin MW: 3:55PM-5:35PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 9 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats for sophomores, 2 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
3726 POLS-104-91 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Funk, Kevin MW: 6:15PM-7:55PM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTDS, INTS
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for first year students, 7 seats for sophomores.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
3515 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Dudas, Mary MF: 11:55AM-1:35PM AAC - GH Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with PHIL
  This course is not open to seniors.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
3122 POLS-219-90 History of Pol Thought I 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course provides the historical background to the development of Western political thought from Greek antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. Readings from primary sources (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, etc.) will help the students to comprehend the foundations of Western political philosophy and the continuity of tradition.
3565 POLS-247-90 Global Inequalities 1.00 LEC Fernandez Milmanda, Belen TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: INTS-247-90
  This course studies inequality in the contemporary world, its different types (wealth, income, gender, racial), its causes and consequences. We will look at inequality both in developing and developed countries as well as inequality in the world system. We will systematically analyze the economic, social and political transformations that have led to an increase in income inequality in the developed world in the last two decades, as well as the processes that have made possible a reduction of inequality in some regions of the developing world.
3151 POLS-257-90 Politics of Violence 1.00 LEC Flom, Hernan WF: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 21 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 9 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats for sophomores, 2 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major.
  This survey course in comparative political analysis will examine how state and non-state actors use violence to assert (or challenge) authority, impose order or ignite conflict-or both at the same time. The course will focus on how and why violence emerges, examining phenomena such as civil wars, revolutions, contentious politics and criminal governance. This course is methodologically focused and is part of the two-course foundational sequence in comparative politics (POLS 257 and POLS 258). Students may choose to take one or both courses in the comparative politics sequence and in whichever order.
  View syllabus
3403 POLS-309-90 Congress and Public Policy 1.00 LEC Manento, Cory TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  A study of the structure and politics of the American Congress. This course examines the relationship between Congress members and their constituents; the organization and operation of Congress; the relationship between legislative behavior and the electoral incentive; and the place of Congress in national policy networks.
3128 POLS-311-90 Polarization and Policy-Making 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  This course will examine the interaction between policy and polarization. We will first survey the contours and history of polarization in America with a focus on the development of the national political parties. We will then examine the interaction of policy making and polarization at the national and state levels: how does polarization affect policy making at the national and state levels; how does policy affect polarization; why have some states become more polarized than others; and how does that polarization affect policy making at the state level? Finally, we will assess the relationship between policy making and polarization at the national and state levels using the case studies of health care and abortion.
3129 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM VC - 101 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3150 POLS-314-90 Comparative Urban Development 1.00 LEC Flom, Hernan WF: 11:55AM-1:35PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with URST
  This course analyzes how politics affects the lives of citizens in cities and metropolitan areas of the developing world. We will focus on two conceptions of urban politics. The first is the specific benefits and problems of the city (as opposed to rural areas), from land use (and its environmental sustainability challenges) and public utilities to political incorporation and intermediation. The second sense is the local as opposed to national or state-level politics: i.e. decentralization, coordination between different government tiers and the specific dynamics of local governance. We will draw primarily on examples in Africa, Asia (especially India and China) and Latin America, focusing on past, present and future challenges for urban development.
  View syllabus
3131 POLS-325-90 American Presidency 1.00 LEC McMahon, Kevin TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  An explanation of the institutional and political evolution of the presidency with an emphasis on the nature of presidential power in domestic and foreign affairs. Attention is also given to institutional conflicts with Congress and the courts. The nature of presidential leadership and personality is also explored.
3132 POLS-329-90 Political Philosophy & Ethics 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 2:00PM-3:15PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course will engage the literature of ethical theory and ethical debate. The course attempts to enlighten the place ethical reasoning plays in political science, political life and the tradition of political philosophy. Readings in the course will differ from year to year but may include such authors as Aristotle, Cicero, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Nietzsche. In different years the course may focus on various themes which could include topics such as feminism, gentlemanliness, Eudaimonism, utilitarianism and deontology, ethics and theology, legal and business ethics, or the place of ethics in the discipline of Political Science.
3133 POLS-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM ADMIS - 301 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: HRST-332-01
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
3520 POLS-359-90 Feminist Political Theory 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: WMGS-359-90
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  This course examines debates in feminist political theory. Topics will include liberal and socialist feminist theory, as well as radical, postcolonial, and postmodern feminist theory. We will also consider feminist perspectives on issues of race and sex, pornography, law and rights, and “hot button” issues like veiling. We will pay particular attention to the question of what feminism means and should mean in increasingly multicultural, global societies. Readings will include work by Mary Wollstonecraft, Carol Gilligan, Catherine MacKinnon, Chandra Mohanty, Wendy Brown, Audre Lorde, Patricia Williams, & Judith Butler.
2616 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM LIB - 206 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with HRST
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
3218 POLS-376-90 Latin American Politics 1.00 LEC Fernandez Milmanda, Belen TR: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: INTS-376-90
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  The course examines the processes of political, economic and social change that took place in Latin America in the XX and XIX Century. Topics include: the rise of populism and import-substituting industrialization, revolutions and revolutionary movements, the causes and consequences of military rule, the politics of economic reform, democratic transitions, the commodity boom, and the left turn. For each topic we will review classic political science theories and critically evaluate their applicability to Latin American countries. We will also discuss the lessons that can be drawn from Latin American cases for the study of these topics in the rest of the world.
3137 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 9:20AM-11:00AM VC - 101 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
1494 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3138 POLS-406-90 Sr Sem: Why Political Phil? 1.00 SEM Smith, Gregory W: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of a major political philosopher in the Western tradition.
2329 POLS-425-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
2618 POLS-426-90 Sr Sem: Who Are We? 1.00 SEM Messina, Anthony MW: 2:00PM-3:40PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  Citizenship historically has been defined as a set of rights and obligations that are exclusive to formal members, or "citizens," of territorially bounded nation states. Transnational migration challenges this assumption by creating citizens outside of and foreign residents or "denizens" inside of traditional nation state territories. Some scholars have suggested that globalization generally -- and migration specifically -- undermines the salience of citizenship and fosters conflict and confusion about who "we" are. This senior seminar will explore the major political and social challenges posed by transnational migration for notions of who "belongs" and who doesn't within the major immigration-receiving countries, including the United States.
1495 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3523 POLS-475-90 The Politics of Health and Med 1.00 SEM Terwiel, Anna MW: 10:00AM-11:40AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  NOTE: Meets Writing Emphasis Part 2 Requirement
  This course examines how biomedical developments are affecting established understandings of individuality, freedom, and citizenship. Practices such as in-vitro fertilization (IVF), transplantation medicine, and stem-cell research do not just create cures for disease. By making bodily material available for ownership, exchange, and screening, they also change individuals' self-understanding as well as their relationships to governments and corporations. Engaging with recent scholarship in political theory, feminist theory, and medical humanities, we will examine the risks that new biomedical technologies exacerbate inequality and exploitation, as well as their promise for creating new forms of kinship and public goods.
1496 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3139 POLS-496-90 Senior Thesis Colloquium 1.00 SEM Chambers, Stefanie T: 6:15PM-9:30PM N/A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  This is a required colloquium for senior political science majors writing theses. The class will proceed in part through course readings about research methods and aims, and in part through offering students the opportunity to present and discuss their thesis projects. All students will be required to write a (non-introductory draft) chapter by semester's end.
1855 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
2437 PSYC-101-01 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Holland, Alisha MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM AAC - GOODTH Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first year students
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1981 PSYC-101-91 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Outten, Robert MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first year students
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
3725 PSYC-101-92 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Holland, Alisha MW: 3:55PM-5:10PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
1550 PSYC-101-99 Introduction to Psychology 1.00 LEC Senland, Amie TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first year students
  An introduction to the basic concepts in psychology with primary emphasis on the study of human behavior. Topics will include motivation, learning, emotion, perception, intelligence, memory, personality, child development, mental illness, and social interaction. Students will be introduced to issues in research techniques by either being involved in on-going faculty research or writing a short paper based on research articles.
3492 PSYC-212-01 LandscapePlan,Environ Ed Brain 1.00 SEM Masino, Susan W: 2:00PM-5:15PM SH - N130 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: NESC-212-90, NESC-212-01
  This Perspectives course will translate emerging research on brain health into landscape planning that supports the health of the planet and everyone in Connecticut's rural, suburban and urban communities. The focus will be nature-based solutions to support biodiversity and protect the climate, green infrastructure to clean our air and water and prevent flooding and heat islands, and public areas that offer refuge and quiet as well as education and recreation. Guest speakers will share their expertise in public policy, environmental law, local ecology, urban planning and environmental justice. There will be a field component and a semester-long project planning interpretive ecology stations and citizen science databases. Grading will be based on a final project, short reflective essays and research papers, and an oral exam.
3493 PSYC-212-90 LandscapePlan,Environ Ed Brain 1.00 SEM Masino, Susan W: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
    Cross-listing: NESC-212-90, NESC-212-01
  This Perspectives course will translate emerging research on brain health into landscape planning that supports the health of the planet and everyone in Connecticut's rural, suburban and urban communities. The focus will be nature-based solutions to support biodiversity and protect the climate, green infrastructure to clean our air and water and prevent flooding and heat islands, and public areas that offer refuge and quiet as well as education and recreation. Guest speakers will share their expertise in public policy, environmental law, local ecology, urban planning and environmental justice. There will be a field component and a semester-long project planning interpretive ecology stations and citizen science databases. Grading will be based on a final project, short reflective essays and research papers, and an oral exam.
1428 PSYC-221-80 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie M: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1429 PSYC-221-81 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie T: 2:00PM-4:40PM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1427 PSYC-221-90 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Reuman, David MWF: 8:55AM-9:45AM N/A Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  NOTE: .
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
  View syllabus
3482 PSYC-255-90 Cognitive Psychology 1.00 LEC Casserly, Elizabeth MWF: 8:40AM-9:45AM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  The study of knowledge and how people use it, for example, in recall and recognition, controlling attention and dealing with distractions, solving real-world problems, and spoken or written communication. We will emphasize how each piece of our mental abilities fits together with other skills such as perception and language, along with the ways in which our minds and thoughts can diverge from what we subjectively experience of them.
3209 PSYC-261-01 Brain and Behavior 1.00 LEC Seraphin, Sally MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM ADMIS - 301 Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: PSYC-261-90
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101 or Biology 140 or Biology 181 or Biology 182 or Biology 183.
  A basic study of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system with a comprehensive analysis of the biological bases of major classes of behavior. Specific topics include: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, sex, and language. Enrollment in laboratory limited. (1.25 course credits with optional laboratory) The course is designed for declared or intended psychology and neuroscience majors.
3210 PSYC-261-21 Brain & Behavior Laboratory 0.25 LAB Ruskin, David W: 6:15PM-8:45PM LSC - B01 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 261-01 or concurrent enrollment.
  A diverse laboratory experience focused on the nervous system. Topics may include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, cognition, and language. The course is designed for declared or intended psychology neuroscience majors. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to PSYC 261.
3483 PSYC-261-90 Brain and Behavior 1.00 LEC Seraphin, Sally MWF: 11:20AM-12:10PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC Cross-listing: PSYC-261-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101 or Biology 140 or Biology 181 or Biology 182 or Biology 183.
  A basic study of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system with a comprehensive analysis of the biological bases of major classes of behavior. Specific topics include: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, sex, and language. Enrollment in laboratory limited. (1.25 course credits with optional laboratory) The course is designed for declared or intended psychology and neuroscience majors.
3743 PSYC-261-91 Brain and Behavior 1.00 LEC Anderson, Beth MWF: 12:40PM-1:30PM N/A Y NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101 or Biology 140 or Biology 181 or Biology 182 or Biology 183.
  A basic study of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system with a comprehensive analysis of the biological bases of major classes of behavior. Specific topics include: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor system functioning, motivated behaviors, learning and memory, emotions, sex, and language. Enrollment in laboratory limited. (1.25 course credits with optional laboratory) The course is designed for declared or intended psychology and neuroscience majors.
3744 PSYC-270-90 Clinical Psychology 1.00 LEC Kennen, Kristine TR: 11:15AM-12:30PM N/A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 13 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  A survey of the concepts, methods, and theoretical issues of clinical psychology, with a focus on current and classical research and theory. Students will explore such areas as personality development from a clinical perspective, assessment, pathology, diagnosis, clinical research, and some preventative and therapeutic modes of intervention. Emphasis will also be placed upon evolving models of clinical psychology and their relationship to other areas of psychology and the life sciences.
3213 PSYC-273-01 Abnormal Psychology 1.00 LEC Holt, Laura TR: 11:15AM-12:55PM MH - 214A Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: In Person Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  NOTE: Seats reserved for Psychology majors
  This course explores how "abnormal" behavior is defined and assessed, and focuses on the epidemiology, etiology (causes), and diagnostic criteria for a range of psychological disorders (e.g., depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, personality disorders), as well as biopsychosocial treatments for these disorders. Students also are introduced to controversial issues in the field.
1417 PSYC-295-80 Child Development-Lab 0.25 LAB Anselmi, Dina M: 2:00PM-5:15PM N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote Course Length: 10 weeks
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 295, or concurrent enrollment.
  An introduction to the major scientific methods of observation, interviews, and experimentation that are used to study developmental questions in the areas of language, memory and concept development, sex-role stereotyping, prosocial development and play. Students will study infant and preschool children at the child care center located on campus. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 295.