Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - Summer 2020 (ALL: 05/19/2020 - 08/14/2020)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1084 AHIS-103-01 Intro to Asian Art 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB1 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ASIANSTDS
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  This course introduces major artistic traditions in Asia, with a focus on China, India and Japan. We will discuss the visual features of these complex traditions and their related social and political issues by analyzing important examples of art and architecture. From the Terracotta Warriors, to Taj Mahal, to Ukiyo-e prints, we will examine art and architecture from the beginning of these Asian traditions to their early modern periods in the nineteenth century.
1003 AHIS-271-01 The Arts of the United States 1.00 LEC Curran, Kathleen MW: 1:30PM-4:30PM N/A ART Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  The course examines key artistic periods of American painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts from the colonial settlements to the turn of the twentieth century (ca. 1650-1900). We begin with the colonial period and the rise of portraiture and history painting during the American Revolution, witnessing how artists like John Singleton Copley forge an indigenous American style. We then focus on genre as well as landscape painting, where we explore themes of politics, race, and reverence for the land. The class examines the American coming of age at the close of the Civil War and examines the careers of such artists as Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, the American Impressionists, and architects H.H. Richardson and McKim, Mead & White.
1015 AMST-298-05 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway, Nicholas TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
1077 AMST-317-05 Curating the Present 1.00 LEC Cancelled SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  We are living through a moment of rupture. Approaching this moment from a heritage perspective, what must we hold on to—physically, emotionally—to curate this story for future generations? How do we do this ethically and without a clear sense of narrative complete with start and end? Drawing lessons from critical heritage literature and a variety of case studies from the recent past, we will seek answers to these probing questions, engaging virtually with a variety of experts throughout the semester. For their final projects, students will create experimental “exhibition catalogues” oriented in real and imagined events and possible futures, or alternately describe why such their exhibitions are impossible—where curating the moment might best be encapsulated by blank spaces and spectral voids.
1008 AMST-329-05 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway, Nicholas MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
1085 AMST-440-05 Autistic Blackness 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-440-05, ENGL-840-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  NOTE: Open to seniors and graduate students. Other undergraduate students should contact Professor Diana Paulin for permission to enroll. Diana.paulin@trincoll.edu
  How might autism and blackness be read alongside each other in a way that matters? By examining how the histories, lived experiences, and representations of autism and blackness intersect, it is possible to move beyond narrow understandings of both and create space for more diverse ways of being in our communities and in our world. What does it mean to recognize that autism is part of the neurodiversity of blackness historically and contemporaneously? What sort of creativity and meaning does the nonlabeled black autists presence add to our understanding blackness? We will examine this topic through an interdisciplinary lens that explores theoretical and historical perspectives of blackness, autism, and neurodiversity/neurodivergence, as well as primary sites of inquiry, including life writing, film, digital media, and performance/
1012 BIOL-121-05 Human Health and Nutrition 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison W: 9:00AM-12:00PM
R: 9:00AM-1:00PM
N/A NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course will focus on basic human physiology and nutrition related to human health. We will examine organ systems, such as cardiovascular, kidney and liver, and explore how diet influences their function, susceptibility to chronic disease and longevity. We will discuss the standard American diet, other dietary philosophies and diet fads and explore the scientific literature to determine their effects on long term health. The course will consist of short weekly zoom sessions, short recorded lectures, exploratory assignments, food preparation and tasting challenges, and written work. All levels of college science background are welcome. Not creditable to the Biology major.
1013 BIOL-216-01 Human Anatomy 1.00 LEC Cancelled NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C - or better in Biology 140 or Biology 182 or Biology 183, or equivalent college-level introductory biology
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  This course will examine the function, development and evolution of the human form. We will examine the anatomy of the musculoskeletal, sensory, nervous, cardiovascular, osmo-regulatory and reproductive systems. Discussions will also include the anatomical basis of certain clinical conditions and pathologies.
1091 BIOL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Independent research supervised by a faculty member in an area of the student’s special interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1059 COLL-113-01 Introduction to Epidemiology 1.00 LEC Hunter, Amy TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles of epidemiology, defined as the study of how disease and injury are distributed in populations, and the factors that influence that distribution. Concepts covered will include measuring morbidity and mortality, study design, association to causation, and ethical and policy considerations. Class time will be divided into lecture and virtual group exercises, using literature, cinema, and public events as prompts for discussion. Students at all levels are welcome.
1083 COLL-164-05 Science Fiction: Origins 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course explores the deep roots of science fiction in human culture. Long before space ships, we were telling ourselves stories about superheroes, alien visitors, fantastic journeys, and utopian societies. We will pair "classic" texts and modern science fiction films--for example: the accounts of a messiah figure such as Mohammed with the film Dune; the story of the fight against a beast in the medieval tale of Beowulf and the film Alien, or Shelley's Frankenstein and the film Ex Machina. We will try to understand why these stories have such a hold on the human imagination and how science fiction has reshaped these fundamentally religious narratives with the trappings of technology.
1064 COLL-308-05 The Transatlantic Century 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  The course will explore the political, economic and cultural dynamics between North America and Europe since the end of the First World War. It will focus on the evolution of the transatlantic relationship and will allow students to test a series of analytical frameworks on key events. Special attention will be given to the attempt to construct a global liberal order, at the creation of a defense alliance with NATO, as well as to cooperation and competitions regarding trade and norms. The course will also investigate and compare how the various actors within the transatlantic community deal with third countries, including those in the Global South.
1004 ECON-210-05 Contemporary Micro Issues 1.00 LEC Cancelled SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course covers economic decision-making by individuals, firms and factor markets, and the role of government in designing economic policy and its impact on individuals. Topics include: Price discrimination; cartels, oligopolies, and monopolistic competition; economics of network goods; labor markets; public goods; political economy; economics, ethics and public policy; incentives; stock markets and consumer choice. Some of the questions we will try to answer among others are: Is in-state vs out-of-state tuition an example of price discrimination? Can OPEC nations collude to force up the price of oil? Why do friends so often enjoy the same musical songs? Why is it that the world is running out of so many kinds of fish? Are markets fair?
1005 ECON-218-05 Intro to Stats for Econ 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  As data and computing resources have become increasingly accessible, economics has become more concerned with measurement and estimation of economic phenomena. This course is designed to familiarize students with common statistical methods used in economics. Topics will include the presentation of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.
1050 ECON-224-05 Macroeconomics and Inequality 1.00 LEC Shikaki, Ibrahim MW: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  US economic inequality is at record levels and is substantially greater than inequality in most other industrialized nations. This course develops key aspects of the inequality debate: how economic inequality is defined and measured, as well as the causes of income inequality in US economy and society. Topics covered will also include the macroeconomic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and it's impact on the level of inequality.
1089 ECON-299-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1049 ECON-312-05 Mathematical Economics 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena TR: 1:30PM-4:30PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or 302, and a C- or better in Mathematics 126 or Mathematics 131.
  NOTE: Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 301 or 302 if taken spring 2020.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course is designed to introduce students to the application of mathematical concepts and techniques to economic problems and economic theory.
1078 ENGL-416-05 Walden 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: ENGL-816-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  Henry David Thoreau was a pioneer of social distancing, but his work speaks to contemporary life in other ways, too. He followed his conscience into conflict with federal law. He studied the natural world so fastidiously that scientists use his journals to document global warming. Thinkers today still argue fervently about Thoreau, and there is even a video game about his time at Walden Pond. This course explores Thoreau's writings, especially WALDEN. Students will read Thoreau collaboratively, using an interactive digital text to engage in asynchronous dialogue in the margins of Thoreau’s works. They will also undertake independent research and writing within a thematic focus of their choosing, possibly including Ecology & Climate, Solitude & Sociality, Ethics & Political Resistance, or Transcendentalism & Eastern Philosophy.
1082 ENGL-426-05 Shakespeare's Poetry 1.00 SEM MacConochie, Alex TR: 6:00PM-9:00PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-826-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  Shakespeare, most famous now as a dramatist, first gained fame for a poem written in quarantine: Venus and Adonis. Written during a plague, Shakespeare’s first major poem is a love story that spends most of its time on obstacles to love: physical and emotional distance, differences in social status, death. These themes recur throughout Shakespeare’s poetry, from his tragic tale of ancient Rome, Lucrece, to the twisted love triangle of the sonnets, with their complex commentary on friendship, trust, betrayal, and mortality. In addition to reading Venus and Adonis, A Lover’s Complaint, Lucrece, and the Sonnets in the historical context of Elizabethan England, students will use online databases to study original texts of Shakespeare’s poems, and develop an online “edition” of a Shakespearean sonnet
1088 ENGL-440-05 Autistic Blackness 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ENGL-840-05, AMST-840-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  NOTE: Open to seniors and graduate students. Other undergraduate students should contact Professor Diana Paulin for permission to enroll. Diana.paulin@trincoll.edu
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. This seminar is research-intensive.
  How might autism and blackness be read alongside each other in a way that matters? By examining how the histories, lived experiences, and representations of autism and blackness intersect, it is possible to move beyond narrow understandings of both and create space for more diverse ways of being in our communities and in our world. What does it mean to recognize that autism is part of the neurodiversity of blackness historically and contemporaneously? What sort of creativity and meaning does the nonlabeled black autists presence add to our understanding blackness? We will examine this topic through an interdisciplinary lens that explores theoretical and historical perspectives of blackness, autism, and neurodiversity/neurodivergence, as well as primary sites of inquiry, including life writing, film, digital media, and performance/
1041 ENGL-457-05 American Crime Fiction 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel MW: 6:30PM-9:30PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: AMST-857-05, ENGL-857-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing post-1900 literature. This seminar is research intensive.
  Crime fiction has been an amazingly resilient and pliable genre, a cultural barometer registering revisions to cultural fantasies about knowledge and power, sex and gender, race and ethnicity, violence and freedom. Its character types are interwoven into the fabric of popular culture, from the detective to the sociopath, the femme fatale to the street tough. This course will trace an alternative American history through the brutal, lurid, and stylish crime fiction of the 20th century. We will explore its pulp roots through Dashiell Hammett, its modernist peaks with Raymond Chandler, its post-war weirdness in Chester Himes and Patricia Highsmith, and its contemporary renaissance by George Pelecanos.
1114 ENGR-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Independent research supervised by a faculty member in an area of the student’s special interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1016 ENVS-282-05 Drone Flight School 1.00 LEC Cancelled Q2
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) or drones have quickly emerged as a new way to explore the world around us. Emerging applications include mapping, photogrammetry, surveying, search and rescue, scientific research, and unmanned cargo delivery to name just a few. In this hands-on course all participants will pilot college owned drones to learn how to fly safely and responsibly to generate maps and 3D models utilizing ArcGIS and photogrammetry software. In addition to learning how to pilot the drones, students will explore the legal issues involved including: privacy and safety; FAA and other federal regulations; state and local laws; and current and future policy implications. The course will provide students with a solid basis for pursuing an FAA remote pilot certificate. Not open to students who have completed ENVS 281.
1079 FORG-272-05 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MW: 6:00PM-9:00PM N/A GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ITAL-272-05, LACS-272-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
1116 HEBR-201-01 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TBA N/A HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with JWST, MIDDLEAST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 102 or equivalent.
  This course continues the development of skills in conversation, composition, and reading. Advanced grammar and syntax are introduced, as well as expanded readings from Israeli newspapers and literature. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
1060 HISP-101-05 Elementary Spanish I 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela MW: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. Students with 3 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1045 HISP-102-05 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1100 HISP-102-05 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela MW: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1014 HISP-103-01 Intensive Beginning Spanish 2.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, narrating in the present, past, and future, vocabulary acquisition, introduction to the subjunctive. Acquiring familiarity with the geography and culture of the Spanish-speaking world will also be emphasized. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. This intensive course combines covers the material from both HISP 101 and 102. Students who have completed HISP 101 or 102, or the equivalent, are not eligible for this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies
1046 HISP-201-05 Intermediate Spanish I 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1002 HIST-272-01 Pacific World 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MW: 1:30PM-4:30PM N/A GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  The Pacific Ocean has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes -- migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.
1136 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1138 HRST-399-01 Human Rights Studies 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
1096 INTS-215-01 Lat America Glbl Commodities 1.00 LEC Pinto-Handler, Sergio TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A GLB2 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  This course examines the role of global commodities — specifically sugar, precious metals, coffee, petroleum and lumber — in Latin America’s past and present. We will explore how the production of these commodities has impacted Latin America’s natural environment, structured the region’s relationship to the world, and created exploitative yet dynamic societies of slaves, peasants and working classes. We will examine how the worldwide spread of Latin American commodities has transformed global consumer demands, altering the way that people consume these commodities and changing the social and cultural meaning that they attach to doing so. Drawing on the interdisciplinary field of commodity studies, students will use methods from across the social sciences and the humanities to understand Latin America’s key role in the process of globalization.
  View syllabus
1071 INTS-215-01 Lat America Glbl Commodities 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  This course examines the role of global commodities — specifically sugar, precious metals, coffee, petroleum and lumber — in Latin America’s past and present. We will explore how the production of these commodities has impacted Latin America’s natural environment, structured the region’s relationship to the world, and created exploitative yet dynamic societies of slaves, peasants and working classes. We will examine how the worldwide spread of Latin American commodities has transformed global consumer demands, altering the way that people consume these commodities and changing the social and cultural meaning that they attach to doing so. Drawing on the interdisciplinary field of commodity studies, students will use methods from across the social sciences and the humanities to understand Latin America’s key role in the process of globalization.
1048 INTS-251-05 Violence & Politics-Latin Amer 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: POLS-251-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course explores the pervasive role of violence in Latin American politics since the mid20th century, blending academic studies with indigenous cultural expressions such as novels and films. We will tackle topics such as authoritarian regimes, civil wars, and criminal violence. For instance, we will look at the Colombian civil war (La Violencia) through the novels of Gabriel García Márquez, at Central American military dictatorships through the works of Mario Vargas Llosa, and at drug-related violence through the work of Brazilian filmmakers such as Fernando Meirelles (City of God) and José Padilha (Elite Squad I and II).
1035 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1066 ITAL-101-05 Elementary Italian I 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take 101 and 102 in sequence. Other than beginning students must have permission of instructor to enroll.
1067 ITAL-102-05 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1106 ITAL-102-06 Elementary Italian II 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension.
1081 ITAL-272-05 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MW: 6:00PM-9:00PM N/A GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: LACS-272-05, FORG-272-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
1080 LACS-272-05 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John MW: 6:00PM-9:00PM N/A GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: ITAL-272-05, FORG-272-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
1061 MATH-107-05 Elements of Statistics 1.00 LEC Babapoor, Youlanda TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  A course designed primarily for students in the social and natural sciences. Topics include graphical methods, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course is not open to students with credit for Mathematics 131 or above, or who have placed into Mathematics 207 on the Mathematic Placement Examination
1051 MATH-107-06 Elements of Statistics 1.00 LEC Whitehead, Brian MW: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 2 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101. Students who qualify or have credit for Mathematics 131 or 207 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  A course designed primarily for students in the social and natural sciences. Topics include graphical methods, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course is not open to students with credit for Mathematics 131 or above, or who have placed into Mathematics 207 on the Mathematic Placement Examination
1052 MATH-114-05 Judgment and Decision Making 1.00 LEC Evans, Kyle MW: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a C- or better in Quantitative Literacy 101.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  In this course, we consider the application of elementary mathematical analysis to various procedures by which societies and individuals make decisions. Topics will include weighted and unweighted voting, apportionment of representatives, redistricting / gerrymandering, and game theory with a theme of understanding decision-making algorithms in the context of historic and modern politics in the United States and around the world.
1056 MATH-121-05 Mathematics of Money 1.00 LEC Cancelled NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Exam and completion of QLIT101 with a grade of C- or better.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  An introduction to concepts related to financial mathematics. Topics will include simple interest, compound interest, annuities, investments, retirement plans, credit cards, and mortgages. A strong background in algebra is required. Not open to students who have received credit for Math 131 or higher.
1097 MATH-121-05 Mathematics of Money 1.00 LEC Cancelled NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Exam and completion of QLIT101 with a grade of C- or better.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  An introduction to concepts related to financial mathematics. Topics will include simple interest, compound interest, annuities, investments, retirement plans, credit cards, and mortgages. A strong background in algebra is required. Not open to students who have received credit for Math 131 or higher.
1125 MATH-131-05 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Cancelled NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1053 MATH-131-05 Calculus I 1.25 LEC Martin, Daniel TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  The real number system, functions and graphs, continuity, derivatives and their applications, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematics, natural science, and computer science majors should begin the Mathematics 131, 132 sequence as soon as possible. Not open to students who have received credit by successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB (see Catalogue section “Advanced Placement for First-Year Students”). At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1062 MATH-132-01 Calculus II 1.25 LEC Pellico, Ryan TR: 1:30PM-4:30PM N/A NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 131, or an appropriate score on the AP Examination or Trinity's Mathematics Qualifying Examination.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  Topics concerning the Riemann integral and its applications, techniques of integration, first-order ordinary differential equations, and sequences and series. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1054 MATH-207-05 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Cancelled NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1055 MATH-207-05 Statistical Data Analysis 1.00 LEC Kreinbihl, James MW: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with ECON
  Prerequisite: A suitable score on the Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C- or better in Mathematics 107 or 127.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  An introductory course in statistics emphasizing modern techniques of data analysis: exploratory data analysis and graphical methods; random variables, statistical distributions, and linear models; classical, robust, and nonparametric methods for estimation and hypothesis testing; analysis of variance and introduction to modern multivariate methods. Those who successfully complete Math 107 may take Math 207 for credit due to its increased depth of coverage and breadth of topics. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1128 MATH-231-01 Calculus III 1.25 LEC Cancelled NUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  Vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Divergence Theorem. At the discretion of the Mathematics Department, section enrollments may be balanced.
1075 MUSC-123-05 Future Horizons in Music 1.00 SEM Cancelled ART Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course is designed to operate in the spirit of crowdsourcing, with students engaged in a conversation over the possible future of music post COVID-19. Primarily, the role that traditional institutions, such as live concert venues, the opera, the dance club, the symphony orchestra, music theater, and that of choral music, may retain in a society that appears to be undergoing significant change. We will search for emerging musical trends from any style or genre, share sample videos or recordings, and provide documentation to open a discussion over each example. There will be weekly listening and reading assignments, and students will be uploading short media projects to sites such as Youtube and Soundcloud. Weekly remote meetings (on Zoom or Skype, for example) may be provided
1076 MUSC-225-01 MIDI & Computer Music 1.00 LEC Cancelled ART Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 175, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  This course explores the skills and techniques necessary to build a foundation in the study of electronic, and computer music production. Topics include rhythm programming, sound design, sampling, processing, basic music theory, and basic audio engineering. By the end of the course, students will possess the tools needed to compose a full-length electronic music production. While the course will be taught primarily in Logic X, techniques covered will be applicable across all DAWs. It is required that students who enroll in this course have a computer, and access to a digital audio workstation (DAW) to use in the course.
1103 MUSC-225-01 MIDI & Computer Music 1.00 LEC Cancelled ART Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 175, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  This course explores the skills and techniques necessary to build a foundation in the study of electronic, and computer music production. Topics include rhythm programming, sound design, sampling, processing, basic music theory, and basic audio engineering. By the end of the course, students will possess the tools needed to compose a full-length electronic music production. While the course will be taught primarily in Logic X, techniques covered will be applicable across all DAWs. It is required that students who enroll in this course have a computer, and access to a digital audio workstation (DAW) to use in the course.
1034 PBPL-430-01 Federal Courts & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 6:30PM-9:10PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-830-01
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  Over the past 30 years, the Supreme Court has been called upon to resolve many important and often controversial public policy questions. The purpose of this course is two-fold: (1) to familiarize students with the role of the federal courts as a policy making institutions; and (2) to carefully analyze actual cases as a means of assessing the scope of the Court's power to shape public policy, especially in areas where there is little political consensus. Readings will include texts and articles on the role of the federal courts and several of the recent court cases.
1006 PHIL-250-05 Love, Death, and Twitter 1.00 SEM Ewegen, Shane TR: 1:30PM-5:00PM N/A HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course will be an exploration of the many ways in which certain technologies -- including cell phones, the internet (and social media), medical technology, and virtual reality -- have changed our experiences and attitudes toward love, death, and education (among other things). By reading the work of a number of philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists, we will gain insight into the impact these technologies have had on our romantic lives, on our understanding of death, and on our ability (or inability) to learn. This course will also entail some virtual-reality experience, as well as some films.
1065 PHIL-289-05 Philosophy of Tragedy 1.00 SEM Ewegen, Shane TR: 1:30PM-4:30PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  Throughout the history of Western philosophy, ancient Greek tragedy has continued to be a source of great fascination. This course shall focus on a number of philosophical analyses of ancient tragedy, including those offered by Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Hegel, and Heidegger. Additionally, several ancient Greek tragedies will be read in order to test the validity of these philosophical analyses. We will see that philosophy itself, owing to this preoccupation with tragedy, takes on a tragic character through the guise of some of these thinkers
1009 PHYS-113-05 Ripped Apart! 1.00 STU Cancelled NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  An introduction to the origin, evolution and eventual fate of the universe. Students will be introduced to the most current ideas in cosmology, including the scientific tools used to study these issues. Topics include: the big bang, galaxy formation, observational evidence for dark matter, dark energy, black holes and the origin and fate of the universe itself. The emphasis will on conceptual, as contrasted with mathematical comprehension, making this an excellent opportunity for non-science majors. The class will be taught in an interactive studio format, which emphasizes collaborative problem solving and data analysis. Class time will be divided between lecture and collaborative group exercises and tutorials. Start your summer with a Bang!....Who knows how it will end?
1047 POLS-251-05 Violence & Politics-Latin Amer 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: INTS-251-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course explores the pervasive role of violence in Latin American politics since the mid20th century, blending academic studies with indigenous cultural expressions such as novels and films. We will tackle topics such as authoritarian regimes, civil wars, and criminal violence. For instance, we will look at the Colombian civil war (La Violencia) through the novels of Gabriel García Márquez, at Central American military dictatorships through the works of Mario Vargas Llosa, and at drug-related violence through the work of Brazilian filmmakers such as Fernando Meirelles (City of God) and José Padilha (Elite Squad I and II).
1022 POLS-304-05 Education and Immigration 1.00 SEM Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
    Cross-listing: PBPL-817-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  NOTE: This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar.
  This course is designed to introduce students to urban educational policy, with particular focus on the major issues and challenges facing urban and suburban policymakers. After a brief overview of the shape and history of the American school system, we will move toward considering a variety of different perspectives on why it has proven so difficult to improve America's schools. We will examine standards-based, market-driven, professionally-led and networked models of reform, looking at their theories of change, implementation challenges, and the critiques leveled against these approaches. We will examine a variety of recent reform efforts at both the federal and state levels. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which immigration and educational policy interact.
1010 POLS-326-05 Gender, Politics, and Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, WMGS
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  NOTE: This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar.
  This course explores the role of gender in American politics. We will begin with an examination of the role of women and men in fighting for and against women's suffrage and the subsequent movement to achieve gender equality. We will consider the many ways men's inclusion and women's exclusion from our political system continues to shape contemporary politics and the distribution of power in American society. We will then examine a series of important questions such as: Why are women less likely than men to run for political office? Is America ready for a woman president? Once in office, do male and female politicians govern differently? The last third of the course examines a series of policy areas with respect to gender.
1063 POLS-333-05 Global Food Politics 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB5 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course investigates the fast-paced environment of global food politics, from the impact of states and international organizations on global food production and distribution, to international trade negotiations such as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP). It also considers the roles of corporations and NGOs, and the dispute resolution mechanisms such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) and arbitration of Investor-State Dispute Settlements (ISDS).
1030 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA N/A Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1072 RHET-103-05 College Writing 1.00 LEC Cancelled Y Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to juniors or seniors.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  An introduction to the art of expository writing, with attention to analytical reading and critical thinking in courses across the college curriculum. Assignments offer students opportunities to read and write about culture, politics, literature, science, and other subjects. Emphasis is placed on helping students to develop their individual skills.
1068 RHET-125-05 Writing for a Digital World 1.00 SEM Cassorla, Leah TR: 1:30PM-4:30PM N/A WEA Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  As reading and writing shift from pages to screens, images and other visual elements are becoming increasingly important to successful writing. This course is designed to help students think critically about the role of the visual in written communication today. Using digital design tools in combination with academic writing skills such as research and drafting, students will develop strategies and skills for blending images and words effectively in a range of genres and contexts - both digital and printed, academic and professional.
1073 RHET-130-01 Visual Rhetorics 1.00 SEM Marino, Nicholas TR: 10:00AM-1:00PM N/A HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  This course explores the rhetorical power of visual images. Students will examine how rhetoric is a means for knowing, communicating, and becoming as they explore different visual media, like photography, video, and even virtual reality. Using rhetorical methodologies, they will research how visual rhetoric creates realities and encourages audiences to become different subjects through an interactive, multimodal project. More specifically, we will explore how the rhetorical appeals (i.e. ethos, logos, and pathos) transform in visual, rhetorical situations, and we will discover how rhetoricians adapt rhetorical situation theory to meet the expectations and needs of viewers. By the end of the course, students will understand how rhetorical theory and practice shapes and is shaped by visual design, multimodal communication, and the politics of visual representation
1130 RHET-395-01 Academic Internship 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: In Person  
  Internship or field work placement, with a required academic component to be determined by the faculty sponsor and student. Students need to submit a completed internship contract form to Career Services. Students will not be enrolled until the contract has been approved.
1007 SOCL-217-05 Lights, Camera, Society! 1.00 LEC Cancelled SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  For some, society is nothing more than a random collection of people all making individual choices in a particular time and location. Yet, this worldview minimizes and overlooks the manifold levels of social life-- social systems, social interaction, and social selves--and our participation in them. Films represent one avenue of illuminating our social world because they mirror back to us key sociological insights of C. Wright Mills, Karl Marx, W.E.B. DuBois, and George Hebert Mead, for example. Students will apply the work of these scholars to films like Wall-e, Norma Rae, Friday Night Lights, and Ex Machina. Class time will involve discussion of films and applied exercises including an extensive role play simulation of Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman, and a trip to the Tenement Museum in New York City.
1102 SOCL-217-06 Lights, Camera, Society! 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta MW: 1:30PM-5:00PM N/A SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  For some, society is nothing more than a random collection of people all making individual choices in a particular time and location. Yet, this worldview minimizes and overlooks the manifold levels of social life-- social systems, social interaction, and social selves--and our participation in them. Films represent one avenue of illuminating our social world because they mirror back to us key sociological insights of C. Wright Mills, Karl Marx, W.E.B. DuBois, and George Hebert Mead, for example. Students will apply the work of these scholars to films like Wall-e, Norma Rae, Friday Night Lights, and Ex Machina. Class time will involve discussion of films and applied exercises including an extensive role play simulation of Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman, and a trip to the Tenement Museum in New York City.
1011 URST-101-05 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Lukens, David MW: 9:30AM-1:00PM N/A SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N Mode of Instruction: Remote  
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.