Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - Summer 2019 (ALL: 05/21/2019 - 08/16/2019)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1010 AMST-298-05 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway, Nicholas TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - S201 HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
1002 AMST-329-05 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway, Nicholas MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM MC - 313 HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 25.
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
1032 AMST-403-05 American Ruins 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - T408 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-803-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  NOTE: This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
  This class explores the nexus between multi-disciplinary literatures on contemporary ruins and that of critical heritage querying how ruins and heritage are socially constructed, the process by which ruins become heritage, and the political and affective valences of ruined sites. Walter Benjamin’s groundbreaking yet unfinished Arcades Project will serve as a beacon and guide. We will navigate these literatures through case studies from the contemporary United States and Latin America. Cases include the rebuilding of New Orleans post-Katrina, the abandoned buildings of Detroit, and the ruins of the World Trade Center post 9/11. We also look at a series of emerging heritage sites including the heritage of violent labor disputes in the early 20th century, and the materiality of undocumented migration in the U.S. southwest. This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
  View syllabus
1034 BERL-101-01 Multilevel German Language 1.00 LEC Evelein, Johannes
Doerre, Jason
TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: BERL-201-01, BERL-102-01
  This co-taught course is designed for students with different levels of German, from novice to intermediate. Emphasis is placed on developing facility in the four language skills (reading, speaking, writing, listening) within the cultural context of the city of Berlin. Students who have already taken German 101 may sign up for the 102 segment of the course. Likewise, students who have completed 102 may enroll at the 201 level. Coursework at all levels comprises regular meetings with the instructors and Berlin-specific language learning exercises.
1035 BERL-102-01 Multilevel German Language 1.00 LEC Evelein, Johannes
Doerre, Jason
TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: BERL-201-01, BERL-101-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 101 or equivalent.
  This co-taught course is designed for students with different levels of German, from novice to intermediate. Emphasis is placed on developing facility in the four language skills (reading, speaking, writing, listening) within the cultural context of the city of Berlin. Students who have already taken German 101 may sign up for the 102 segment of the course. Likewise, students who have completed 102 may enroll at the 201 level. Coursework at all levels comprises regular meetings with the instructors and Berlin-specific language learning exercises.
1036 BERL-201-01 Multilevel German Language 1.00 LEC Evelein, Johannes
Doerre, Jason
TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: BERL-102-01, BERL-101-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 102 or equivalent.
  This co-taught course is designed for students with different levels of German, from novice to intermediate. Emphasis is placed on developing facility in the four language skills (reading, speaking, writing, listening) within the cultural context of the city of Berlin. Students who have already taken German 101 may sign up for the 102 segment of the course. Likewise, students who have completed 102 may enroll at the 201 level. Coursework at all levels comprises regular meetings with the instructors and Berlin-specific language learning exercises.
1039 BERL-230-01 Berlin Stories 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  As Germany’s only metropolis, Berlin has provided the setting for a great deal of political, historical and cultural phenomena. It is no surprise then that many of Germany’s defining cultural and historical narratives involve the city of Berlin. Using a selection of literary, filmic, biographical and historical texts across time, as well as locations in Berlin, this course seeks to explore these Berlin stories, as well as their people and places. Not only will this course deal with Berlin’s more famous daughters and sons, but also perspectives from the margins. This course will introduce students to a diverse spectrum of people, places and narratives set in and around Berlin.
1037 BERL-309-01 Berlin:The Transformative City 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-309-01
  The focus of this course is the remarkable development and transformation of Berlin from its beginnings as the capital of Prussia to its redefinition as the new political and cultural center of the post-Cold War "Berlin Republic". Special attention will be given to Berlin's exponential growth in the 19th century; its new imperial status as capital of the German Reich; the Nazi dream of transforming Berlin into the all-powerful "Germania" dwarfing Rome and Paris; a city divided following World War II; and the transformative energy unleashed in the wake of German reunification.
1069 BERL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and program director are required for enrollment.
1015 BIOL-121-15 Human Health and Nutrition 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison MW: 10:00AM-12:00PM
R: 10:00AM-1:00PM
CT - 308 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Summer Institute
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 25.
  This course will focus on basic human physiology and nutrition related to human health. We will examine organ systems, such as cardiovascular, kidney and liver, and explore how diet influences their function, susceptibility to chronic disease and longevity. We will discuss the standard American diet, other dietary philosophies and diet fads and explore the scientific literature to determine their effects on long term health. Throughout the course, we will explore food through tastings, examination of menus and recipes, dining out and cooking and students will develop personal dietary strategies for good health. All levels of college science background are welcome. Not creditable to the Biology major.
1004 BIOL-216-01 Human Anatomy 1.00 LEC Dunlap, Kent TR: 6:00PM-9:00PM LSC - 132 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C - or better in Biology 140 or Biology 182 or Biology 183, or equivalent college-level introductory biology
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  This course will examine the function, development and evolution of the human form. We will examine the anatomy of the musculoskeletal, sensory, nervous, cardiovascular, osmo-regulatory and reproductive systems. Discussions will also include the anatomical basis of certain clinical conditions and pathologies.
1011 CHEM-155-05 Archaeological Chemistry 1.00 LEC Parr, Maria TR: 1:30PM-5:00PM LIB - 181 NAT Q2
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  This course is designed to introduce students to the application of chemical principles to the exploration and explication of archaeological issues. From the identification of ancient trading routes through pottery analysis to the elucidation of human interactions with the environment through investigation of human remains, this course will demonstrate the utility of chemistry and chemical methodologies to archaeological research. Not creditable to chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1014 CPSC-110-01 Computing with Mobile Phones 1.00 LEC Cancelled NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  App Inventor for Android is a new open source programming language for Android smart phones. App Inventor is a visual language that enables novice programmers to create powerful mobile applications that interact with the web and with other phones. In this course, students will learn how to access the world of mobile services and applications as creators, not just consumers. They will learn to create entertaining and socially useful apps that can be shared with friends and family. In addition to learning to program and how to become better problem solvers, students will also explore the exciting world of computer science from the perspective of mobile computing and its increasingly important effect on society.
1116 ECON-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301 or Economics 302, as appropriate.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1006 ENVS-112-01 Introduction to Earth Science 1.25 LEC Cancelled GLB3 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 36 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  NOTE: ENVS 112-20 lab is required, you will be enrolled in both sections when you sign up for ENVS 112-01
  The course will introduce students to the basic principles of geology, such as rock and mineral identification, the interpretation of the geological record, and the theory of plate tectonics. These principles will allow us to reconstruct the Earth’s history, to interpret sedimentary records in terms of environmental change, and to assess the impact of human activity on the Earth system. Additional topics include volcanoes and igneous rocks, sedimentary environments, the Earth’s climatic history, the formation of mountain ranges and continents, and an introduction to the Earth’s interior. Two one-day field trips focus on the local geology and the various rock types found within the state.
1031 ENVS-112-20 Introduction to Earth Science 1.25 LAB Cancelled GLB3 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: N
  The course will introduce students to the basic principles of geology, such as rock and mineral identification, the interpretation of the geological record, and the theory of plate tectonics. These principles will allow us to reconstruct the Earth’s history, to interpret sedimentary records in terms of environmental change, and to assess the impact of human activity on the Earth system. Additional topics include volcanoes and igneous rocks, sedimentary environments, the Earth’s climatic history, the formation of mountain ranges and continents, and an introduction to the Earth’s interior. Two one-day field trips focus on the local geology and the various rock types found within the state.
1009 ENVS-130-10 Geology of CT State Parks 1.00 LEC Cancelled NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Summer Institute
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  NOTE: Three required Saturday field trips: May 25, June 8 and 22, 9 am - 4 pm
  From the glacial carved falls that cascade over hard rocks is the Eastern Highlands to the dinosaur trackways in the Hartford Basin's silt stones, State Parks in Connecticut preserve beautiful landscapes that serve as nature's classroom. Connecticut is home to 107 State Parks that have been in operation for over 100 years! In this class we will explore the geologic processes and principles responsible for shaping the majority of Connecticut’s parks. In addition we will learn about the history of the park system and selected parks, as well as how geologic processes and assessment of hazards affect park policy and development. Possible destinations include Bluff Point State Park, Dinosaur State Park, as well as Bolton Notch and Devil’s Hopyard State Parks.
1038 HIST-309-01 Berlin:The Transformative City 1.00 SEM Evelein, Johannes TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: BERL-309-01
  The focus of this course is the remarkable development and transformation of Berlin from its beginnings as the capital of Prussia to its redefinition as the new political and cultural center of the post-Cold War "Berlin Republic". Special attention will be given to Berlin's exponential growth in the 19th century; its new imperial status as capital of the German Reich; the Nazi dream of transforming Berlin into the all-powerful "Germania" dwarfing Rome and Paris; a city divided following World War II; and the transformative energy unleashed in the wake of German reunification.
1029 HIST-348-01 Pacific War Museums in Japan 1.00 SEM Bayliss, Jeffrey TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  NOTE: This course includes travel to Japan. Please contact the Study Away Office for approval.
  Japan’s defeat in the Pacific War was so complete and destructive that even today, Japanese society struggles with the question of whether Japan was aggressor or victim in the conflict. Through readings that explore the history of the conflict, postwar Japanese views of the war, and the contemporary politics around the issue, as well as through visits to sites of historical commemoration, this course will give students a deep understanding of the variety of cultural and political issues that arise through defeat in a costly, total war. Sites to be visited include Tokyo (firebombed in March 1945), Okinawa (invaded in April), and Hiroshima (site of the first nuclear attack in August).
1063 INTS-313-01 River Cities of Asia 1.50 SEM Notar, Beth
Chen, Xiangming
Shen, Yipeng
Myers, Garth
TBA TBA Y GLB Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: URST-313-01
  Today, throughout Asia, many cities are undergoing rapid growth resulting in dramatic economic, social, cultural, and environmental transformation. Because of the strong relationship between cities and rivers, such rapid growth puts increasing pressures on water resources, river ecosystems, and the human frameworks. Using two prominent river/city systems, the Yangtze and the Irrawaddy, as case studies, this summer course will provide integrated historical, cultural, and environmental understandings of four key cities — Shanghai, Chongqing, Mandalay, and Yangon — located on the banks of these waterways. The course will examine the historical emergence of the cities we visit, explore interrelationships between urban expansion and environmental consequences of rapid economic growth, and examine people’s perceptions of environmental and cultural change in China and Myanmar.
1003 NESC-120-05 Nervous Connections 1.00 LEC Swart, Chris MW: 9:30AM-1:00PM CCAN - 102 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 25.
  Recent scientific research indicates that a worm has 302 neurons, snails have long-term memory, and elephants can hear through their feet. This course will draw on current research in neuroscience to explain why information about other animals is relevant to our lives. Selected readings, lectures and class discussions will provide a basic understanding of the human nervous system and how research on animal systems has yielded this knowledge. Laboratory exercises will introduce the students to nervous system anatomy and function through dissection and experimental techniques. A basic understanding of biology and chemistry will be helpful, but this course has no pre-requisites. First-year students are given preference.
1113 NESC-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1033 PBPL-410-01 Fed Courts & Policy Sel Topics 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne MW: 6:00PM-9:00PM MC - 205 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-810-01
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  This course will introduce students to the work of the federal courts and their role in the policy making process. We will focus on the problem of political polarization on the Supreme Court and the growing contentiousness of the nomination process. We will apply our knowledge of these matters as we read and analyze selected cases currently under review by the justices. The cases we will study address these legal issues: voting rights and political gerrymandering; gun rights; citizenship and the 2020 census, and civil forfeiture.
1020 PHYS-113-01 Ripped Apart! 1.00 STU Mills, Bradley MW: 1:30PM-4:30PM MC - 219 NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  An introduction to the origin, evolution and eventual fate of the universe. Students will be introduced to the most current ideas in cosmology, including the scientific tools used to study these issues. Topics include: the big bang, galaxy formation, observational evidence for dark matter, dark energy, black holes and the origin and fate of the universe itself. The emphasis will on conceptual, as contrasted with mathematical comprehension, making this an excellent opportunity for non-science majors. The class will be taught in an interactive studio format, which emphasizes collaborative problem solving and data analysis. Class time will be divided between lecture and collaborative group exercises and tutorials. Start your summer with a Bang!....Who knows how it will end?
1018 POLS-304-05 Education and Immigration 1.00 SEM Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - S204 SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-817-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 25.
  This course is designed to introduce students to urban educational policy, with particular focus on the major issues and challenges facing urban and suburban policymakers. After a brief overview of the shape and history of the American school system, we will move toward considering a variety of different perspectives on why it has proven so difficult to improve America's schools. We will examine standards-based, market-driven, professionally-led and networked models of reform, looking at their theories of change, implementation challenges, and the critiques leveled against these approaches. We will examine a variety of recent reform efforts at both the federal and state levels. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which immigration and educational policy interact.
1012 POLS-326-05 Gender, Politics, and Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - S205 SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, EDUC, WMGS
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  This course explores the role of gender in American politics. We will begin with an examination of the role of women and men in fighting for and against women's suffrage and the subsequent movement to achieve gender equality. We will consider the many ways men's inclusion and women's exclusion from our political system continues to shape contemporary politics and the distribution of power in American society. We will then examine a series of important questions such as: Why are women less likely than men to run for political office? Is America ready for a woman president? Once in office, do male and female politicians govern differently? The last third of the course examines a series of policy areas with respect to gender.
1066 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1008 QLIT-101-01 Foundat Tech Quantitat Reason 1.00 LEC Gingras, Kaitlyn TR: 6:00PM-9:00PM MECC - 172 Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  This course offers students new insights into important and widely used mathematical concepts, with a strong focus on numerical and algebraic relationships.
1080 RHET-395-01 Academic Internship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Internship or field work placement, with a required academic component to be determined by the faculty sponsor and student. Students need to submit a completed internship contract form to Career Services. Students will not be enrolled until the contract has been approved.
1021 SOCL-217-01 Light, Camera, Society! 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta MW: 1:30PM-4:30PM SH - T121 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  This course invites students to think about society from a sociological rather than individualistic viewpoint. For many, society is nothing more than a random collection of people all making individual choices in a particular time and location. Yet, this worldview minimizes and overlooks the manifold levels of social life-- social systems, social interaction, and social selves--and our participation in them. Films represent one avenue of illuminating our social world because they mirror back to us key sociological insights of C.Wright Mills, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, George Hebert Mead, and Erving Goffman, for example. Students will apply the work of these scholars to films and television including Wall-e, 13 Reasons Why, A Bug’s Life, Ex Machina, Black Mirror, and Tootsie.
1062 URST-313-01 River Cities of Asia 1.50 SEM Notar, Beth
Chen, Xiangming
Shen, Yipeng
Myers, Garth
TBA TBA Y GLB Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: INTS-313-01
  Today, throughout Asia, many cities are undergoing rapid growth resulting in dramatic economic, social, cultural, and environmental transformation. Because of the strong relationship between cities and rivers, such rapid growth puts increasing pressures on water resources, river ecosystems, and the human frameworks. Using two prominent river/city systems, the Yangtze and the Irrawaddy, as case studies, this summer course will provide integrated historical, cultural, and environmental understandings of four key cities — Shanghai, Chongqing, Mandalay, and Yangon — located on the banks of these waterways. The course will examine the historical emergence of the cities we visit, explore interrelationships between urban expansion and environmental consequences of rapid economic growth, and examine people’s perceptions of environmental and cultural change in China and Myanmar.
1095 CLCV-300-01 Archaeological Excavation 2.00 SEM Risser, Martha TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, ARTHISTORY, INTS, JWST, RELG
  As part of a consortium with Pennsylvania State University and other schools, Trinity College runs a summer archaeological field school program at Akko in Israel. The main components of this course will be archaeological excavation, recording, field analysis, and preservation. Through site tours, field trips, workshops, and a lecture series, we will also study the major historical and archaeological periods represented in Akko and the larger context in which Akko functioned. See Professor Risser for dates and details. Permission of instructor required. This multidisciplinary course contributes to majors in Anthropology, Art History, Classics, Classical Civilization, History, International Studies, Jewish Studies, and Religion; minors in Architectural Studies, Classical Antiquity, and the Classical Tradition; and the Cities Program.
1007 HISP-103-01 Intensive Beginning Spanish 2.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MTWR: 6:00PM-9:00PM SH - S205 GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on July 2.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, narrating in the present, past, and future, vocabulary acquisition, introduction to the subjunctive. Acquiring familiarity with the geography and culture of the Spanish-speaking world will also be emphasized. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. This intensive course combines covers the material from both HISP 101 and 102. Students who have completed HISP 101 or 102, or the equivalent, are not eligible for this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies
1076 ROME-101-01 Intensive Introductory Italian 1.50 LEC Emerson, Eleanor
Scully, Melissa
TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  A course designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian.
1077 ROME-102-01 Advanced Introductory Italian 1.50 LEC Emerson, Eleanor
Scully, Melissa
TBA TBA Y GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing conversation, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension.
1030 ROME-235-01 Food and Culture 1.00 SEM Emerson, Eleanor
Scully, Melissa
TBA TBA Y GLB Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  The saying, “A tavola non s’invecchia” (“One doesn’t age at the supper table”) expresses the importance of food and eating for Italians. In this course, we will examine the relationship between food and culture in Italy, from the ancient world to the present, through a variety of readings, class discussion and some personal and practical experience. Because the study of food culture in Italy invites comparison with your own alimentary habits, we will examine the culture and meaning of food in Italy and in your own country. If “we are what we eat”, then “what” we choose to eat affects many aspects of our lives. The study of food culture is an interdisciplinary study. Even though the historical point of view will be the main one, during our reading, class discussion and lecture we will touch upon a lot of different fields: anthropology, sociology, literature, art, philosophy. Besides studying food culture through readings, written assignments, and class discussion, students will undertake a group-learning project around Rome that will enhance their classroom experience.
1075 ROME-259-01 Futurist Rome 1.00 SEM Emerson, Eleanor
Scully, Melissa
TBA TBA GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This course will introduce students to Italy’s most important modern art movement, Futurism. Feeling themselves oppressed by the great weight of Italy’s past artistic traditions —the venerated splendors of Roman Antiquity, the Renaissance and the Baroque periods — the Italian Futurists composed militant artistic manifestos and explored radical new forms of expression across the various arts with the aim of rejuvenating Italy and its people. This course will examine the reach of the Futurists call to arms in various sectors of art and society (painting, sculpture, literature, music, cuisine, politics, publicity) in order to fully understand the movement’s impact and legacy. During the course, we will try to imagine how the Futurist saw Rome at the turn of the century and reflect on what it means to Italian contemporary artists today. Lectures will be complemented by numerous on-site visits in the city and a weekend trip to one of Italy’s largest modern art collections in the mountains near Trento.
1078 ROME-276-01 Myth, Memory and Meaning 1.00 SEM Emerson, Eleanor
Scully, Melissa
TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course will take the construction memory and identity in Rome and as means of analysing the country and nation’s post-Unification development. Through a combination of class lectures and discussions and site visits to key places of memory and identity construction in Rome, students will gain a knowledge of the capital’s key role in the creation of modern Italy, in addition to an in-depth understanding of the difficulties encountered in state and identity formation up until the present day. Providing a solid grounding in Italian history it will also introduce students to memory studies and the importance of not just history but the manner and nature of its construction, especially through monuments, to contemporary society and politics.