Course Schedule

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Summer 2019 (ALL: 05/21/2019 - 08/16/2019)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1010 AMST-298-05 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway, Nicholas TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - S201 HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
1002 AMST-329-05 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway, Nicholas MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM MC - 313 HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 25.
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
1032 AMST-403-05 American Ruins 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - T408 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-803-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  NOTE: This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
  This class explores the nexus between multi-disciplinary literatures on contemporary ruins and that of critical heritage querying how ruins and heritage are socially constructed, the process by which ruins become heritage, and the political and affective valences of ruined sites. Walter Benjamin’s groundbreaking yet unfinished Arcades Project will serve as a beacon and guide. We will navigate these literatures through case studies from the contemporary United States and Latin America. Cases include the rebuilding of New Orleans post-Katrina, the abandoned buildings of Detroit, and the ruins of the World Trade Center post 9/11. We also look at a series of emerging heritage sites including the heritage of violent labor disputes in the early 20th century, and the materiality of undocumented migration in the U.S. southwest. This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
  View syllabus
1024 AMST-803-05 American Ruins 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - T408 Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-403-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  This class explores the nexus between multi-disciplinary literatures on contemporary ruins and that of critical heritage querying how ruins and heritage are socially constructed, the process by which ruins become heritage, and the political and affective valences of ruined sites. Walter Benjamin’s groundbreaking yet unfinished Arcades Project will serve as a beacon and guide. We will navigate these literatures through case studies from the contemporary United States and Latin America. Cases include the rebuilding of New Orleans post-Katrina, the abandoned buildings of Detroit, and the ruins of the World Trade Center post 9/11. We also look at a series of emerging heritage sites including the heritage of violent labor disputes in the early 20th century, and the materiality of undocumented migration in the U.S. southwest. This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
1052 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1040 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1041 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1046 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1049 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
1027 ENGL-868-01 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 16.
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets--not all of them American--who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 868-16 and English 468-06 are the same course. For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirements of a course in American literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
1012 POLS-326-05 Gender, Politics, and Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM SH - S205 SOC Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, EDUC, WMGS
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 9.
  This course explores the role of gender in American politics. We will begin with an examination of the role of women and men in fighting for and against women's suffrage and the subsequent movement to achieve gender equality. We will consider the many ways men's inclusion and women's exclusion from our political system continues to shape contemporary politics and the distribution of power in American society. We will then examine a series of important questions such as: Why are women less likely than men to run for political office? Is America ready for a woman president? Once in office, do male and female politicians govern differently? The last third of the course examines a series of policy areas with respect to gender.