Course Schedule

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Course Listing for All Departments - January 2019 (ALL: 01/07/2019 - 01/18/2019)
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1002 AMST-120-01 Fashioning America: 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Class will meet from 1/7 through 1/15
  We will examine the history and meanings of significant chapters in American clothing culture from the nineteenth century to today. Some of our topics will include: fashion advice and the shaping of the nation, gendered garments and body politics, clothing and ethnic identities, and the global politics of clothing production, consumerism, and recycling. Students will also share their own interests in developments such as today’s secondhand clothes industries, fashion and media, and wearable technologies. Our classroom work will be enriched by visual and material culture workshops at museums and other organizations in and near Hartford.
1029 AMST-281-01 Stand-up Comic as Social Activ 0.50 LEC Conway, Nicholas MWF: 1:00PM-4:20PM SH - N128  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course will explore the power of stand-up comedians to provide social commentary that has historically invoked social and/or political change. We will accomplish this through the lens of several specific comics, notably Moms Mabley, Richard Pryor, Dick Gregory, Dave Chappelle, George Carlin, and Janeane Garofalo. Taking time to appreciate both the aesthetics of the performances and the insightfulness of the social critique, we will take a deep dive into some of the most legendary, controversial, and thought-provoking skits and routines of all time.
1003 BIOL-119-01 Nutrition: Food and Fads 0.50 LEC Draper, Alison TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This class will meet in Clement 210 as follows:
  NOTE: Tues 1/8, 10am-1pm
  NOTE: Wed 1/9, 10am-12pm
  NOTE: Thurs 1/10, 10am-1pm
  NOTE: Fri 1/11, 10am-12pm
  NOTE: Mon 1/14, 10am-1pm
  NOTE: Tues 1/15, 10am-12pm
  NOTE: Wed 1/16, 10am-1pm
  NOTE: Thurs 1/17, 10am-12pm
  This course will explore many aspects of nutrition including the science of food, popular diet plans and cultural views of nutrition. We will use scientific texts and primary literature to explore the science of food, nutritional supplements, food intolerance and allergy and the effect of diet on health. Students will work in small groups to explore the strengths and weaknesses of fad diets. As an ongoing project throughout the course, students will design a diet plan based on their own needs, philosophy, preferences, health history and family and cultural history and will follow their plan and reflect on the experience. We will also incorporate cooking class-selected recipes and dining experiences in relation to nutrition. All levels of college science background are welcome. Not creditable to the biology major.
1030 COLL-120-01 College as a Network 0.50 SEM Mahoney, Mary
Jones, Jason
TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: Only students admitted for the Spring 2019 J-start program are allowed to enroll in this course. It is required for all students in this program.
  We are all part of networks that create connections between people and things, in our lives online, and in the everyday spaces where we live and learn on a college campus. "College as a Network” suggests that there are powerful advantages to thinking about the overlapping networks that organize, empower, and support your time at Trinity College. This course will give you some conceptual and practical tools for navigating college, for understanding how to become more aware of how you are situated in networks, and for recognizing networks in data. Together we will explore such questions as: what makes a college education distinctive? What is unique about a Trinity College education? How can you make your education yours?
1004 COLL-203-01 Analyzing/Commun Financl Data 0.50 LAB Hoag, Christopher
Cape, Cheryl
MTWRF: 10:00AM-12:00PM UNASSIGNED -  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will meet from 10 am - 12 pm from January 7 to January 16. The course will meet from 9 am - 12 pm from January 17 to January 18.
  Private citizens, public policymakers, and industry leaders increasingly are overwhelmed by data intended to help inform decision-making. This course is designed to help students identify, organize, and analyze data strategically, with a focus on data sources relevant to financial activity. Non-technical data analysis and visualization will be used to illuminate policy outcomes or to assist with the prediction of the likely behavior of governments, firms, or financial variables. The course will utilize both proprietary and open data sources to extract political, economic, financial, social, and historical information. The course will not count toward any major, and no previous knowledge or experience in financial economics is expected. Recommended: one course in statistics or social science methods
1015 COLL-206-01 God and Science:Compatible? 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course will explore the current status of the compatibility of religious faith and science. The two sides of this controversial relationship will be evaluated through the many readings of both theologians and scientists, atheists and evangelicals. The history of this controversy between science and a belief in God will be reviewed, but emphasis will be placed on late 20th/21st century developments. We will look into whether or not the conversation can be moved beyond the boundaries of the story of Creation as told in the Christian Bible. Prior scientific or theological training is not required, neither is any specific belief system.
1011 COLL-209-01 Future European Union/Brexit 0.50 SEM Lefebvre, Thomas TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course includes travel to France. Please contact the Study Away Office for approval.
  The outcome of the referendum held in the United Kingdom on June 23, in which British citizens decided to leave the European Union (EU), commonly referred to as Brexit, has far reaching economical and political consequences. This course will offer students the opportunity to engage with the ongoing debate over the future of the European Union following this vote. This course will alternate between short lectures, visits, workshops, and debates. The course will introduce students to current debates on institutions, public opinion, economy, security, and transatlantic relationship. As a center for debates on the EU, Paris is a key location for studying European politics. Students will engage with EU and French officials about the subject during visits to the European Commission’s delegation to France and to the French National Assembly.
1017 COLL-217-01 Prediction, Privacy, and you 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  We live in an age where "cheap" digital storage and wide scale availability to the computing power to process and analyze it, is changing the world we live in. That is abundantly clear in scientific disciplines from physics to bioengineering, from the humanities to the social sciences. But the growing ability for commercial entities to predict your behavior has both a utility and a cost. How does Amazon seem to uncannily offer you the right related products you're interested in? Should a foreign company have access to Facebook data to attempt to influence your vote? In this course we'll investigate not only the methods they employ but also the impact on you as an individual and how you can begin to be thoughtful about your privacy.
  View syllabus
1018 COLL-218-01 Archives and Exhibits 0.50 STU Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
  In this course, students will learn how to conduct primary source research with archives and special collections and how to create online exhibitions with these materials. Students will also learn proper care and handling of rare materials, metadata collection, digital preservation techniques and how to create interactive online exhibits that use crowdsourcing tools and GIS mapping tools.
1005 COLL-237-01 Designing Your Life 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  What is the purpose of a college education? What if I could develop skills and strategies in college that would help me to solve complex problems and design my own future? Using Stanford University’s award-winning, paradigm-shifting curriculum and the literature of higher education and design thinking, students will engage these questions critically. Assignments include reflective writing and fast-paced, interactive exercises intended to reinforce the fundamental principles, methods, and applications of design thinking.
1006 COLL-244-01 Envisioning Yourself as Leader 0.50 LEC Chambers, Stefanie MTWRF: 9:00AM-1:00PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Meets January 7-11 only
  Leadership means different things to different people. To some the idea of leadership centers on elective office. For others, the term suggests activism around specific social issues, business advancement, or holding influential positions in the non-profit sector. Various theories about leadership and the skills necessary to be a leader will be analyzed throughout the course. Carefully selected readings will guide our discussions about leadership. We will consider the challenges and opportunities for groups trying to achieve new leadership positions. Issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality will also be considered as they pertain to leadership trends and norms in the US and abroad. Outside speakers, fieldtrips and consultation with career development experts will help each student set goals and create a strategic leadership plan.
1025 EDUC-102-01 Blogging in the City 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: URST-102-01
  Community activists, entrepreneurs, and researchers in the city use blogs to tell stories. Simple written blogs now include video and audio components such as podcasts, as well as other interactive components. Whether they focus on education, politics, business, or community issues, blogs are now ubiquitous parts of our lives. This class will teach how to start a blog, perform basic operations on Wordpress, and maintain a blog during the J-term about a topic related to the city (e.g. education, business, sports, community issues). While blogs are useful tools, they also require responsibility. This course will also explore the ethics of blogging on the web. Students new to blogging are encouraged to enroll.
1019 ENGL-206-01 Walden 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Henry David Thoreau recently turned 200, and he seems almost still alive. Climate scientists use data from his journals to document global warming. Legal scholars debate his relevance. There's even a video game based on his time at Walden Pond. So what's all the fuss? This course revolves around careful study of Thoreau's most famous work, WALDEN, and its place in American culture. At a time when serious thinkers question whether "nature" even still exists apart from human activity, students in this course (whether firsttime readers of Thoreau or more experienced ones) will have the opportunity to consider WALDEN's significance for how we understand the natural world--as well as its limitations, including centuries-old forms of indigenous knowledge Thoreau couldn't fully grasp.
1007 ENVS-281-01 DroneFlightSch-Making Maps 0.50 SEM Tatem, David MWF: 10:00AM-1:30PM LIB - 119  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
  Unmanned Arial Systems (UAS) or drones have quickly emerged as a new way to explore the world around us. Emerging applications include surveying, search and rescue, scientific research and unmanned cargo. Mapping via drones is a growing field as drone imagining technology is compatible with desktop mapping software. Responsible drone usage requires knowledge of FAA regulations especially in urban areas where local air traffic could be impacted. This hands-on course will introduce students to UAS technology and all participants will learn how to fly drones safely and responsibly. They will then use the drones and associated imaging software to construct maps on and/or off campus. Not open to students who have completed ENVS 282.
1012 HIST-237-01 The History of French Wine 0.50 SEM Regan-Lefebvre, Jennifer TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course includes travel to France. Please contact the Study Away Office for approval.
  This course introduces the history of French wine. Students will gain a critical, contextualised understanding of how French wine has evolved over the past three centuries and made its mark on French culture, society and politics. This short, intense course is taught in Paris and incorporates the city experientially. Classes will be divided into short taught sections, in-depth discussions of primary and secondary literature, and three excursions: a professional wine tasting emphasizing regional differences in France and the concept of terroir; a visit to a working vineyard to highlight the technical and spatial aspects of wine production; and a visit to a wine museum to explore the evolution of wine through material culture. Assessment is through four short papers, a quiz and a final exam.
1023 HIST-262-01 Democracy: Ancient Athens 0.50 SEM Caldwell, Lauren MTWR: 10:00AM-12:30PM SH - N128  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: CLCV-262-01
  In this course, students will be immersed in the world of democracy at its beginnings in classical Athens of the 5th century BCE. Class sessions will be dedicated to 'The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 BCE', an interactive and role-playing game in which each student takes on a role in a political faction in Athens in order to engage in lively debates about imperialism, military goals, and governance structures. Questions to be considered will be among these: Should Athenian citizenship be broadened to include the slaves who fought for democracy? Should leaders continue to be chosen by random lottery? Should Athens abandon its naval expansion and focus on its internal domestic economy and agriculture? In-class debates on these topics will be informed by readings from Plato's Republic, Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War, and Xenophon's Anabasis. By investigating democracy at this pivotal point in Western history, students will come away with a deeper understanding of, and increased ability to reflect on, key issues that inform and influence democratic political systems, whether ancient or modern.
1020 MATH-112-01 Prison Gerrymandering 0.50 LEC Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 16 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Course will meet from January 7 through January 15.
  This course will provide an introduction to the drawing electoral district lines and the mathematics behind gerrymandering. We will focus in particular on the notions of compactness and contiguity in relation to prison gerrymandering in Connecticut. Students will learn about the geometry of redistricting and voting theory to better understand the impact of prison gerrymandering.
1009 MATH-160-01 Using R for Data Visualization 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination, or C- or better in Mathematics 127.
  This course will provide an introduction to some of the visual methods used to handle and interpret big datasets such as those frequently collected in science, e-commerce, and government. Students will learn to use R Studio, a statistical programming environment, to explore large datasets and to communicate their results. Though the course does not assume any prior statistical or programming background, students should be comfortable with mathematical reasoning and logic.
1010 SOCL-234-01 Campus Sexual Assault 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  What can a sociological perspective tell us about the social problem of campus sexual assault? This course examines empirical evidence regarding the scope of sexual assault on college campuses and how to address claims which challenge this data. For example, students learn how social scientists measure and report sexual violence and sexual consent. Within sociology, intersectionality and microsociology perspectives tell us how past, present, and future understandings of sexual violation are socially constructed by society. Readings incorporate legal histories and studies of rape trials, rape-prone versus rape-free campus cultures, sexual consent and coercion, and victim-blaming. In addition to data and theory, this course also illustrates critical praxis like bystander intervention strategies. Class materials include relevant readings, in-class exercises, and documentary films.
1021 THDN-104-01 Yoga: Practice and Philosophy 0.50 STU Farlow, Lesley MTWR: 10:00AM-1:00PM TC - 152  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Yoga is much more than twisting yourself into interesting positions. This ancient practice was developed as a process of integrating and focusing cognition, physical action and devotion to something greater than oneself. In this course we will engage in the physical and meditative practice of yoga, combined with a study of its philosophical underpinnings. Students will learn basic asanas, breathing techniques and engage in mindfulness meditation. We will read the Yoga Sutras by Patanjali, discuss and write about the Eight Limbs of Yoga, as well as the concepts of intention, suffering and ease as they apply to the practice. Students will also learn to create an individual practice.
1026 TNTB-216-01 Ridge to Reef 0.50 SEM Chambers, Joseph TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course includes travel to Tobago. Please contact the Study Away Office for approval.
  This course examines the policy and practice of establishing a conservation area in a remote corner of the Caribbean: Northeast Tobago. Students examine efforts to establish a natural heritage protected area to link the oldest rainforest reserve in the western hemisphere with other terrestrial ecological assets, historic and cultural sites, coastal fishing villages, and marine ecosystems. What policy goals and practical challenges are involved? What are the most effective ways to apply cooperative management principles to mitigate stakeholder conflict? How can conservation, livelihoods, cultural values, and capacity building be linked to achieve mutual benefits? Students consider such questions through readings, workshops, stakeholder discussions, lectures, and explorations of illustrative “ridge-to-reef” sites. Students also collaborate to document a former cocoa processing facility – a significant historic and cultural asset.
1024 URST-102-01 Blogging in the City 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: EDUC-102-01
  Community activists, entrepreneurs, and researchers in the city use blogs to tell stories. Simple written blogs now include video and audio components such as podcasts, as well as other interactive components. Whether they focus on education, politics, business, or community issues, blogs are now ubiquitous parts of our lives. This class will teach how to start a blog, perform basic operations on Wordpress, and maintain a blog during the J-term about a topic related to the city (e.g. education, business, sports, community issues). While blogs are useful tools, they also require responsibility. This course will also explore the ethics of blogging on the web. Students new to blogging are encouraged to enroll.
1028 URST-307-01 Urban Swahili Coast 0.50 SEM Myers, Garth TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Enrollment capped at 2nd, 3rd or 4th year students only, GPA 3.0 or above, with a prerequisite of at least one Africa-focused course.
  NOTE: This course includes travel to Tanzania. Please contact the Study Away Office for approval.
  This course uses Zanzibar as a laboratory for understanding Swahili Coast urbanism. For millennia, cities along East Africa’s coast have linked Africa with trade networks across the world, from China to Connecticut. Zanzibar was central to these networks for centuries. After independence in December 1963, and a socialist revolution in January 1964, Zanzibar became a semi-sovereign part of Tanzania. From less than 50,000 people in 1964, it has now grown to a metropolitan area of more than 600,000. Zanzibar’s society and culture are very cosmopolitan, with diverse influences, notably in the city’s architecture and built environment. Zanzibar is thus a spectacular place in which to explore the challenges of balancing historic preservation and urban development in architecture and urban planning.
1016 CLCV-112-01 Volcanoes, Art & Archaeology 0.50 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This class will meet as follows:
  NOTE: Tues. Jan 8: 9:30am - 12:00 pm
  NOTE: Tues. Jan 15: 9:30 am to 12:30 pm
  NOTE: Wed. Jan 16: 9:30 am to 1:30 pm
  NOTE: Thurs. Jan 17: 9:30 am to 1:30 pm
  NOTE: Fri. Jan 18: 9:30 am to 1:30 pm
  NOTE: Mon. Jan 7: 9:30 am - 12:00 pm
  This interdisciplinary course invites students to explore the fascinating interconnections among volcanic eruptions, volcanology, volcanic imagery, and ancient sites buried by eruptions, notably Thera in 1525 BCE and Pompeii and Herculaneum in AD 79. Over the millennia, what have people thought about volcanoes? How have they depicted them in art, myth, and literature? Here, the story begins with the world’s earliest (5000 BCE) landscape painting, which happens to show an erupting volcano. The final topic of the course investigates how the Thera and Vesuvius eruptions destroyed the towns in their path, yet preserved a wealth of unique art and archaeological evidence.
1022 CLCV-262-01 Democracy: Ancient Athens 0.50 SEM Caldwell, Lauren MTWR: 10:00AM-12:30PM SH - N128  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-262-01
  In this course, students will be immersed in the world of democracy at its beginnings in classical Athens of the 5th century BCE. Class sessions will be dedicated to 'The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 BCE', an interactive and role-playing game in which each student takes on a role in a political faction in Athens in order to engage in lively debates about imperialism, military goals, and governance structures. Questions to be considered will be among these: Should Athenian citizenship be broadened to include the slaves who fought for democracy? Should leaders continue to be chosen by random lottery? Should Athens abandon its naval expansion and focus on its internal domestic economy and agriculture? In-class debates on these topics will be informed by readings from Plato's Republic, Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War, and Xenophon's Anabasis. By investigating democracy at this pivotal point in Western history, students will come away with a deeper understanding of, and increased ability to reflect on, key issues that inform and influence democratic political systems, whether ancient or modern.
1027 LACS-233-01 Godfather: Art of Hard Choices 0.50 LEC Alcorn, John MTWR: 9:30AM-12:00PM LIB - 103  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N
  The Godfather and The Godfather Part II films are narrative masterpieces that provide many insights into the interplay of character and culture in decision-making in high-stakes situations outside the law. We will interpret the films as illustrations of strategic interaction in stylized mafia settings. We will focus on the psychology of motivations: rationality, interest, emotion, justice, and the mafia’s code of honor (vendetta, omertà, and gender norms). And we will discuss narrative techniques and the relationship between art and life (fiction and reality).
  View syllabus