Course Catalog for URBAN STUDIES
URST 101
Introduction to Urban Studies
This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy. (SOC)
This course is not open to seniors.
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 102
Blogging in the City
Community activists, entrepreneurs, and researchers in the city use blogs to tell stories. Simple written blogs now include video and audio components such as podcasts, as well as other interactive components. Whether they focus on education, politics, business, or community issues, blogs are now ubiquitous parts of our lives. This class will teach how to start a blog, perform basic operations on Wordpress, and maintain a blog during the J-term about a topic related to the city (e.g. education, business, sports, community issues). While blogs are useful tools, they also require responsibility. This course will also explore the ethics of blogging on the web. Students new to blogging are encouraged to enroll.
0.50 units, Seminar
URST 108
Electronic Dance Music Cultures since 1980
This seminar explores the origins and evolution of the two main music scenes that have dominated electronic dance music since the late 1980s: House Music, which grew out of mostly African American, Latino, and Gay nightclubs in Chicago and New York, but flourished more in England and Europe beginning in the late 1980; and Techno, which emerged from African American Detroit, but flourished more Berlin and elsewhere in Europe. As an Urban Studies seminar, the seminar’s core focus is on the urban geographies of these music scenes, as well as issues of gender, sexuality, race, international migrations, globalization, and political economy. Sources include readings, documentary films, music videos, music playlists, as well as articles and posts in blogs, online magazines, and social media. (GLB)
0.50 units, Seminar
URST 150
The Infrastructure of Cities: Power, People, Politic
Infrastructure is the material basis of urban life. Roads, railways, electric grids, and telecommunication networks support the flows of labor, capital, credit, debt, and knowledge. Infrastructures also express ideals of democracy, progress, and modernity and, in their seeming hiddenness, make visible issues of belonging, identity, and citizenship. Infrastructures reveal racist colonial legacies and patterns of inequality. In this course we will explore the infrastructure of cities via an interdisciplinary lens, asking such questions as, what is the importance of infrastructure to modern state-making projects? How are demands for urban livability expressed via infrastructures such as the water supply? From the corroded pipes in Flint, Michigan to the gridlocked roads in Jakarta, Indonesia, we will explore the meanings, matter, and materiality of what is beneath us.
0.50 units, Seminar
URST 200
Hartford: Past and Present
Focusing on both Hartford and its region since the 1630s, this course explores key themes in American urban, social, economic, cultural, and political history, paying close attention to issues of race/ethnicity, gender/sexuality, class relations, religion, and urbanism. We first examine interactions between Native groups, English settlers, African slaves, and their descendants, from the Colonial Era to the Early Republic (1630s-1830s). We then explore urban cultures, abolitionism, European and African American migration, and Hartford's as a global financial and manufacturing center (1830s-1940s). Finally, from the 1940s to the present, topics include suburbanization, deindustrialization, racial segregation, Civil Rights movements, West Indian and Puerto Ricans migration, neoliberalism, globalization, and relations between Hartford and its suburbs. We also track Trinity College's history since 1823. (HUM)
Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in URST101 or CTYP101
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 201
From Hartford to World Cities: Comparative Urban Dynamics
The 21st century is truly a global urban age characterized by the simultaneous decline and revival of post-industrial cities in the United States and the co-existence of boom and poverty in the rapidly industrializing cities in developing countries, as well as by how globalization is exerting a growing impact on urban places and processes everywhere. This course adopts an integrated and comparative approach to studying the local and global characteristics, conditions, and consequences of the growth and transformation of cities and communities. Using Hartford—Trinity's hometown—as a point or place of departure, the course takes students to a set of world or global cities outside the United States, especially a few dynamic mega-cities in developing countries to explore the differences and surprising similarities among them. (GLB5)
PR: URST101 or CTYP101 or SOCL 101
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 203
Urban Nightlife since 1964
Dance music scenes and their urban spaces are social arenas in which discriminatory norms of sexism, homophobia, racism, class elitism and ethnocentrism can be subverted and transformed. Using studies of New York City, Chicago, Berlin, London, Philadelphia, and Rio de Janeiro, we examine urban nightlife's music scenes from the mid-1960s to the present, highlighting the roles played by the evolution of social liberation movements, capitalism and international migrations. We explore innovative research in Critical Race Studies, Queer Studies, Feminist Studies, and Urban Studies that has recast nightlife as far more than banal entertainment and debauchery, viewing it instead as a force propelling broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change. (GLB2)
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 204
Urbanization and Development
This course takes a comparative approach to urbanization and development. It not only draws case studies from different world regions, but also pays particular attention to China's urban transformation. The first segment, 'foundations of urbanization', introduces key themes and builds up theoretical foundations about urbanization in relation to economic development. Segment two, entitled 'process of urban development', focuses on the physical dimension of the cities, exploring the power of urban landscapes and how cities are built. The third segment, entitled 'people and place', highlights social dimension of urbanization and socio-spatial inequality. Finally, the fourth segment, entitled 'governing global urbanization', explores the changing governance and policy making in response to urban problems.
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 205
Urban Economic Geography
The intent of this course is to introduce students to a variety of economic principles and concepts relating to economic geography. The main focus of the class will center around the themes of globalization, development and place. Discussion will focus on key environmental and human resources as well as their impacts on economic systems across the globe. Students are expected to not only learn key economic terms, but to attribute them to patterns in global and regional economic processes and activities. Topics include, but are not limited to regional specialization, finance and investment, economic governance, transportation and the digital economy. (SOC)
This course is not open to first-year students.
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 206
Organizing by Neighborhood: An Internship/Seminar Experience
Have you ever wondered why some neighborhoods thrive and others appear to fail? Are you mystified about what can be done to stem deterioration and provide decent, affordable housing and clean and safe neighborhoods? One way to explore answers to these questions is to intern with a community-based organization dedicated to working with a community as it defines and responds to its problems. In this seminar each student will do a community learning project/ internship at such an organization in Hartford. Equally important is a way to understand and interpret your experiences at the organization. The rich theoretical literature that you will read in this seminar on how neighborhoods are organized and function and on models of community responses to neighborhood conditions provides a lens through which to evaluate your experiences with your organization and community.
This course is not open to first-year students.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 207
Learning from Hartford: Post-Industrial Urban Futures
What happens after urban crisis? The American city continues to be a laboratory for responses to austerity, government decentralization and market-based solutions to pressing urban public problems that are also associated with intense racial, ethnic and economic inequalities. Such dynamics stem from deindustrialization and post-industrial transitions across distressed Rust Belt cities, from Detroit, MI to Hartford, CT. From land banks to urban agriculture and participatory budgeting, the overall purpose of this course is to have students examine the possibilities and limitations of different strategies that have been employed to reimagine distressed American cities. Overall, this course seeks to identify how the social use-value of post-industrial cities can be understood in an era of sustainable urban development. (SOC)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 208
Digital Urban Investigation
This course teaches students basic data collection techniques, emphasizes good research practices, and develops students abilities to apply appropriate methods of data collection and analysis to research questions while focusing solely on digital research methods. Students will learn to use social explorer and other census-based data sources, how to analyze social media and link it to spatial data, explore cities and analyze neighborhood change through google street view's time machine function, participatory mapping, and other online sources. These methods will be used to complete interactive assignments testing major paradigms in urban studies and build familiarity with data sources and research skills. (SOC)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Urban Studies 101 or CTYP 101 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 210
Sustainable Urban Development
With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements. (GLB)
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 211
The Politics of Real Estate
The course examines the political, social, and economic dimensions of real estate in Hartford and New York. The course delves into the tension between use and exchange values and how political context shapes the balance of power between stakeholders in these cities. Specific topics include growth machine politics, rent control, gentrification, tenant organizing, and Business Improvement Districts. This course has a community learning component and will feature invited guest speakers and include a field trip to New York.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 212
Landscape Planning and Environmental Education for Brain Health
This Perspectives course will translate emerging research on brain health into landscape planning that supports the health of the planet and everyone in Connecticut's rural, suburban and urban communities. The focus will be nature-based solutions to support biodiversity and protect the climate, green infrastructure to clean our air and water and prevent flooding and heat islands, and public areas that offer refuge and quiet as well as education and recreation. Guest speakers will share their expertise in public policy, environmental law, local ecology, urban planning and environmental justice. There will be a field component and a semester-long project planning interpretive ecology stations and citizen science databases. Grading will be based on a final project, short reflective essays and research papers, and an oral exam. (SOC)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 212
Big Data and China’s Urbanization
Big data provides a comprehensive and in-time approach for studying the material and social spaces of cities and improving the understanding of cities as urban systems. It also generates broad and timely information for improving urban planning at various scales. This new course will deal with the use of big data to study the main characteristics and dimensions of China's urban development by addressing such topics as population migration, credit card use, high-speed rail flows, coal consumption, environmental quality, and other dimensions of urban development. The course will also touch on how the big-data approach to Chinese cities can be extended to other urban systems. (SOC)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 215
Latin American Cities
Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile. (GLB2)
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 218
Chinese Global Cities
This course exposes students to a broad treatment of China's large number and diverse type of cities with established or emerging global city status and influence. China not only has the most, fastest growing, and regionally most varied cities in the world but also steers them to be global in connectivity and capacity through top-down and decentralized policy and planning. In sequential sections, the course examines a set of general and China-specific conditions that favor or hamper global city building: scale and location, path dependency, state power vs. market dynamics, in-migration and incorporation, culture, and regional linkages and integration. The course guides students to investigate the global attributes, connections, and functions of such diverse cities as Shanghai, Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Chongqing, Xian, Yiwu, Ruili, and Horgos. (GLB5)
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 222
Ancient Cities of the Near East, Egypt, and the Mediterranean World
This course traces ancient urbanism from the development of Neolithic sedentism to the massive cities of the Hellenistic kingdoms and the Roman Empire. We will examine both primary and secondary texts, together with evidence from art and archaeology, to assemble a composite view of urban life and the environmental, topographical, political, cultural, and economic factors that shaped some of the most impressive cities ever built, many of which remain major metropolitan centers today. (HUM)
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 243
Barcelona: Reading the City
In this course we will analyze the various cultural processes-such as literature, art, architecture, film and sports-through which urban identities are formed. The particular object of our study will be the city Barcelona and its inhabitants. Using a wide variety of written and spoken texts, including books, films, tourist guides and advertising, we will analyze the genesis the various, and at times conflicting, representations of that 2000 year-old Mediterranean city and its people. (GLB2)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 249
Multi-cultural Cities of the Mediterranean
In today's Europe, states generally seek to engender the highest possible degree of cultural and linguistic uniformity within their borders. Many people thus presume that these societies have always been organized upon this principle. However, the history of the Mediterranean basin tells a very different story. There, until quite recently, the cultures of important cities like Trieste, Barcelona, Istanbul, Alexandria, Tunis, Thessaloniki, Gibraltar and Livorno were characterized by a profoundly multicultural and multilingual ethos. In this class, we will study the histories of these “polyglot cities” and retrace the ethnic and commercial networks that often bound them together. We will also explore the forces that eventually undermined their long-standing diversity and webs of interconnectedness in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. (GLB2)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 257
Global Crime Fiction
This course explores works of Francophone, Sinophone, American, and Japanese crime literature and films in relation to the spatial dissemination of global capitalism since late twentieth century. Students will develop skills of close reading and discourse analysis, and reach a deeper understanding of how people narrate reality in three different kinds of space: the urban, the postcolonial, and the bodily. Focused issues include migrant workers, sex slaves, drug trade, financial fraud, and environmental hazards. All instructional materials in English. (GLB1)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 259
Latinx Urban Activism since 1900
We will examine the emergence and evolution of urban political activism by Latinas and Latinos in the United States from the early 1900s to the present. We will begin with the impact of U.S. imperial expansion and colonialism (1848-present), and then track the emergence of Pan-Latinx identities and political coalitions between Latinx, African Americans, and other ethnic groups. Topics include urban political manifestations of the following: civil rights movements, labor and student movements, struggles for gender and sexual liberation, immigration policies, citizenship, voting rights, electoral representation, cultural citizenship, urban renewal, gentrification, and "the right to the city." (HUM)
1.00 units, Lecture
URST 260
The City in African Studies: Past, Present, and Potential
Africa is a rapidly urbanizing region of the world; the most rapidly urbanizing by World Bank standards. Contemporary urbanization in Africa has stimulated new scholarship on the history of African cities, African urban economies, urban politics and urban identities, among other topics. African urban studies has produced some of the most thoughtful and engaged work on Africa to date. In this course we will be exploring major themes in the field of African urban studies to gain deeper appreciation of the history of African cities, their contemporary iterations, and their future possibilities. (GLB)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 280
American Cities and Local Governments: The Legal Perspectives
This course exposes students to the legal frameworks within which American cities and local governments operate. Through reading leading cases from various federal and state courts and writings of important urban thinkers, it explores the division of power between local, state, and federal government and evaluates the desirability of the current system in the broader context of democracy and good government. The course also examines how city decision-making is shaped by the relevant legal frameworks and in turn shapes important aspects of American life, including how racial and ethnic divisions fracture American metropolitan areas. Discussion topics include urban zoning and planning, exclusionary zonings and racial segregation, urban renewal and property rights, public schools and charter schools, and sanctuary cities and immigration. (SOC)
Prerequisite: PBPL 123 or permission of instructor
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 301
Community Oriented Development Strategies to Address Urban Decline in the United States
In this course we will explore the causes of neighborhood decline, examine the history, current practice and guiding policies of community development, and see firsthand selected community development strategies at work in the local communities surrounding Trinity College. We will pay close attention to the influence of ideas in good currency in the field of urban development such as smart growth, transit oriented development, land-banking and place-making. The course is organized around four questions: What are the underlying forces behind neighborhood decline? How and why did community development emerge? How has community development practice reconciled itself with current concepts that guide urban development such as new urbanism, smart growth, place-making and land-banking. What does the future hold for disinvested communities and for community development practice?
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 302
Global Cities
This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization. (GLB)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 304
Developmental Cities in East and Southeast Asia
This course examines urban development in East and Southeast Asia through the lens of the developmental state. The course provides students with an overview of developmental state theory and its origins in the developmentalist policies of Japan, South Korea, China, Indonesia, and the Philippines and demonstrates the impact of these policies on the urban form. Major topics include the impact of developmentalist policies on housing, education, public/private space, and the development of special economic zones and other economic tools. The course uses in-depth case studies of these issues in a variety of East and Southeast Asian cities to demonstrate the characteristics and consequences of developmental urbanism. (GLB5)
Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in URST101 or CTYP101
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 306
From Troy to Zhujiajiao (“Shanghai’s Venice”): Ancient Cities of Mainland Asia
This course traces ancient urbanism from the development of Neolithic sedentism to the massive cities of ancient China, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. We will examine evidence from art, archaeology, and written texts to assemble a composite view of urban life and the environmental, topographical, political, cultural, and economic factors that shaped some of the most impressive cities ever built, many of which remain major metropolitan centers today. (GLB2)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 307
Silk, Pearls, and Glass: Ancient Trade and Trade Routes between the East and the West
Roman glass and coins have been found in China, and accounts of Chinese silk in the Roman world are numerous. How were commodities and currencies transported over land and by sea? Where were the trade routes? What archaeological sites, cities, and shipwrecks have been explored along these routes? Who controlled the trade routes? How? In this course we will examine evidence from art, archaeology, and written texts to explore evidence for trade and trade routes between East Asia and Europe in antiquity (GLB2)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 307
Architecture and Urban Planning on the Swahili Coast
This course uses the city and polity of Zanzibar as a model and laboratory for understanding the architectural history, geography and planning of Swahili Coast urbanism in East Africa. For more than a thousand years, cities along the East African coastal strip have been major entrepôts linking the African interior with trade networks across the Indian Ocean and beyond. Zanzibar was at the center of this urban region economically and politically especially in the 18thand 19th centuries. After gaining independence in 1963, Zanzibar experienced a socialist revolution and union with Tanganyika during a brief stretch in early 1964, after which it became a partner state in the United Republic of Tanzania. After a period of stasis and even decline, the city's population exploded after 1964. From a town of less than 50,000 people, it has grown to a metropolitan area of more than a half million in just over 55 years. Zanzibar's society and culture are heavily cosmopolitan. Over 90% of the population is Muslim and African-Swahili in ethnic terms, yet the influences (and minority cultures) of Christians, Hindus, Arabs, South Asians, and others abound. This is especially the case in the city's architecture and built environment. All of this makes Zanzibar a spectacular context in which to explore the challenges of balancing historic preservation and urban development in architecture and urban planning. This online course will enable students to investigate Zanzibar's historic importance, architectural significance, and contemporary urban planning and urban environmental challenges. Students will have readings, lectures and virtual visits and case analyses to/for specific important sites and urban planning projects. (GLB5)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 313
Urban China Field Studies
China has urbanized most rapidly and on the largest scale with transformative economic and social consequences in human history. This course conducts field studies of issues regarding urban China through an interdisciplinary lens. In a three-week instructional/study trip in select Chinese cities, students attend lectures by both Trinity instructors and local Chinese faculty, visit local urban development projects, factories, governmental offices, communities and neighborhoods, and complete a variety of academic assignments. The course will regularly take place in the city-regions of Shanghai and Shenzhen to take advantage of their instructional values and Trinity’s academic partnerships with top-ranked local universities, although it may rotate to other cities from year to year. This course serves as both a key engaged learning component of the Urban Studies program and an integrating exercise for the Urban China Studies minor. (GLB)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 313
Silk Road Cities: A Field Investigation
The Silk Road stimulated and connected the growth of cities between China and Europe as trading posts and resting places. These mostly overland cities or towns created long-distance connections between national and local histories, cultures, religions, and ethnic groups across borders. While some of these past connections have been eroded by shifted political boundaries, a number of Chinese Silk Road cities have resurged in growth and influence due to the favorable policies under China’s “One Belt One Road” initiative. Adopting an interlinked historical and contemporary approach, this course will investigate the original status and subsequent change of these historic cities through classical and contemporary readings and local field studies of the built environment and other evidence. Through a cultural lens, the course will introduce film as a learning medium for enhancing the benefits from text reading,discourse analysis, and on-site visits. By integrating historical and cultural perspectives in multiple local settings, this course aims to provide students with a broad but grounded understanding of the diverse intersections between the past, present, and future of several distinctive Silk Road cities in China.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 318
Reshaping Global Urbanization
This course aims to provide an extensive and in-depth understanding of China's prominent and powerful role in shaping a new and significant era of global urbanization. Having urbanized at the fastest pace, on the largest scale, and in the shortest time period in human history, China has been "building out" by constructing transport infrastructure, industrial zones, and municipal facilities in many countries. The course first assesses the Chinese mode of urban development focused on its beneficial and problematic social and spatial consequences. In the following segments, the course examines China's varied approach to and experience in city-building and infrastructure construction in Southeast Asia, Africa, and parts of Europe. The course concludes on the theoretical and policy implications of "China-fueled" global urbanization, especially for developing countries. (GLB5)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 320
Urban Research Practicum
This research seminar is designed to prepare students for conducting urban research, in Hartford or in any city. The course will include an in-depth survey of methods and approaches in the field. Students will develop research proposals and conduct research projects for term papers. The seminar is geared both for seniors working to produce honors theses and urban studies majors and minors planning on conducting independent study projects. The aim is to foster skill development and enhance training in research methodologies and techniques, including projects with applied components, community learning connections, and/or pure research endeavors.
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in URST 101 and URST201
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 321
Geographies of Transport: Being on the Move in the 21st Global Urban Century
Mobility is a permanent aspect of life. Transport infrastructures are a determinant of the spatial, economic, and social structures of cities. This course will introduce students to the spatial and social aspects of transportation and mobility across the globe. This course will act as a forum for research into transport and mobility, including debates on the planning and formation of transport policymaking. (SOC)
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 328
Comparative Urbanism: Life Since 1850
This course explores urban history and urban planning by focusing on how certain models of urbanism emerged alongside modernity and capitalism since Paris was transformed into the emblematic city of capitalist modernity in 1850-1870. Topics include urban spaces, urban planning and architecture; the interplay between politics and social movements; finance capital and real-estate development; and mass consumption and sports mega-events. Examples will include cities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia. (GLB)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 395
Academic Internship
Students enroll by submitting a contract through Career Development.
1.00 units, Independent Study
URST 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
URST 401
Senior Seminar
This course serves as a capstone seminar with two purposes. First, it provides a comparative and integrated treatment of the urban scholarship through an intensive and interdisciplinary reading of advanced books and articles, rigorous discussions, and in-depth writing. This course allows students to widen and deepen the cumulative content and experience they have gained from previous urban courses, study abroad programs, and urban engagement and internship projects. Secondly, by connecting and even tailoring some of the seminar’s content to individual students, the course prepares and guides students to undertake and successfully complete a senior thesis for the Urban Studies major. (WEB)
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201, Sociology 227 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 433
Introduction to Urban Planning
This course provides an overview of urban planning. Students will be introduced to key theories and concepts as well as methods and empirical case studies in this multidimensional field. Lectures and seminar discussions concentrate on applications of urban planning theories and concepts as practiced by urban planners. Topics discussed in the course may include regional, environmental, metropolitan, transportation, spatial, and land-use planning issues. Empirical emphasis is expected to be on Hartford and other Connecticut cities, but the course may discuss other American or international urban areas. The course is an elective geared toward public policy graduate students with an interest in urban policy, regardless of their track. This course may be of interest to American studies graduate students as well (permission of adviser required).
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 466
Teaching Assistantship
No Course Description Available.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
URST 490
Research Assistantship
From time to time the opportunity exists for students to assist professors in their research. Hours and duties will be determined on the basis of project needs and student interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
URST 497
Single Semester Thesis
Submission of special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the director are required for enrollment. (WEB)
1.00 units, Independent Study
URST 498
Senior Thesis, Part 1
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (WEB)
2.00 units, Independent Study
URST 499
Senior Thesis, Part 2
Written report and formal presentation of a research project. Required of all students who wish to earn honors in Urban Studies. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (WEB)
2.00 units, Independent Study
URST 801
Community Oriented Development Strategies to Address Urban Decline in the United States
In this course we will explore the causes of neighborhood decline, examine the history, current practice and guiding policies of community development, and see firsthand selected community development strategies at work in the local communities surrounding Trinity College. We will pay close attention to the influence of ideas in good currency in the field of urban development such as smart growth, transit oriented development, land-banking and place-making. The course is organized around four questions: What are the underlying forces behind neighborhood decline? How and why did community development emerge? How has community development practice reconciled itself with current concepts that guide urban development such as new urbanism, smart growth, place-making and land-banking. What does the future hold for disinvested communities and for community development practice?
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 802
Global Cities
This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization. (GLB)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 805
Meds, Eds, Slot Machines, and Stadiums: Culture Industries and the New Urban Economy
Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford. (HUM)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 821
Geographies of Transport: Being on the Move in the 21st Global Urban Century
Mobility is a permanent aspect of life. Transport infrastructures are a determinant of the spatial, economic, and social structures of cities. This course will introduce students to the spatial and social aspects of transportation and mobility across the globe. This course will act as a forum for research into transport and mobility, including debates on the planning and formation of transport policymaking. (SOC)
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 833
Introduction to Urban Planning
This course provides an overview of urban planning. Students will be introduced to key theories and concepts as well as methods and empirical case studies in this multidimensional field. Lectures and seminar discussions concentrate on applications of urban planning theories and concepts as practiced by urban planners. Topics discussed in the course may include regional, environmental, metropolitan, transportation, spatial, and land-use planning issues. Empirical emphasis is expected to be on Hartford and other Connecticut cities, but the course may discuss other American or international urban areas. The course is an elective geared toward public policy graduate students with an interest in urban policy, regardless of their track. This course may be of interest to American studies graduate students as well (permission of adviser required).
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 860
Public Management
This course will survey the core principles and practices of management in the public sector. Many modern commentators have argued that public institutions must be "run like a business" to achieve its mission in an efficient and accountable way. Is this argument valid? If not, how must the management of public institutions adapt or depart from basic business principles? Course readings will focus on key elements of successful management in the public sphere, including financial and budgetary oversight, capital planning, public transparency and inclusion, and workforce management. Students will engage with course material through a series of short essays or policy memoranda, an independent research project analyzing the management of an individual public institution or agency, and making recommendations for enhancements to its management structure and practices.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 869
Leadership in the Policy Arena
What is "Leadership?" To what extent can it be defined and practiced according to fundamental general principles? How must the application of such principles be adapted to differing institutional, organizational, and community settings, and to varying situations? Can anyone lead effectively with sufficient opportunity and, if so, to what degree must leadership be "personalized" by each individual? This course will explore leadership principles through readings from a broad spectrum of fields and historical periods and seek to identify the key lessons to be applied to leadership in the current public policy sphere. Students will engage with the course material through a series of short essays and one independent research project focused on a leadership analysis of a contemporary public institution or not-for-profit organization.
1.00 units, Seminar
URST 874
Public Policy Practicum
The Practicum is a semester-long opportunity for students to apply and expand their knowledge and technical skills by performing an actual consulting engagement for a public sector client organization. Practicum students will work in small teams to analyze and make recommendations with respect to issues of real significance faced by their clients. Each engagement will combine research, project planning, and problem-solving challenges, as well as substantial client contact. Client organizations are selected from across the policy spectrum to better enable students to pursue subject matters of particular relevance to their studies and career interests. Each engagement will culminate in a final report and formal presentation to the client organization. The Practicum instructor will provide careful guidance and participants will have opportunities to share ideas, experiences, and best practices.
1.00 units, Seminar