Course Catalog for MUSIC
MUSC 101
Basic Musicianship
An introduction to the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structure of tonal music, with the emphasis on the development of a chordal vocabulary equally adaptable to classical and popular music. A required weekly practicum will stress ear-training (recognition of intervals, chords, rhythms, etc.) and its practical applications at the keyboard. Prerequisite for Music 201, may not be counted toward the major in music. (ART)
1.25 units, Lecture
MUSC 105
Instrumental Ensemble
Coached by Hartford-area professionals, chamber music ensembles are formed as a result of placement auditions with the Coordinator. Every effort is made to group students with others at the same skill level. Ensembles perform at least once each semester. Ensembles repertoire includes works from Western art musical traditions as well as arrangements of popular music songs and world music traditions. (ART)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 107
Lessons
Individual instruction in voice or an instrument is offered by teachers invited to the College campus; credit may also be granted for lessons taken from outside teachers who have been approved by the coordinator. Students must contact an instructor and schedule lessons before permission can be granted to register for the course. Lessons require an extra fee. Fees for Lessons are $600 for eleven one-hour lessons, payable directly to the instructor. Financial aid to cover instructors' fees is available on a limited basis to Trinity Grant students. Decisions on grant awards will be made on Friday of the first week of classes. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of the coordinator.
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 108
Steel Pan Ensemble
Students will learn the history and social significance of steel pan music in Trinidad. Additionally, students will understand the musical roles of each instrument in the ensemble and learn the techniques associated with playing each of them. Students will be expected to learn and memorize arrangements of classical, popular, and traditional calypso music. The music will be taught aurally and by rote by an instructor from Trinidad. (ART)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 109
Jazz Ensemble
Jazz is America's own art form! The Jazz Ensemble studies and performs the compositions of Ellington, Monk, Coltrane, Hancock, and others, as well as original works by Professor Allen and the group members. Styles span the gamut of jazz history, from traditional swing to fusion and jam band funk. We will work hard on improving individually and as a group, with focus on creative improvising, group interplay, and solid grooves. There are usually two performances per semester at various venues on campus. (ART)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 111
Samba Ensemble
Emphasis is on the study and performance of the Brazilian samba drumming tradition. Related musical styles and musical genres are also included. Previous performance experience is not required, and students may take this course for more than one semester. Membership by permission of the instructor. Also listed under International Studies – Latin American and Caribbean. (GLB1)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 112
Contemporary Music Ensemble
The Trinity Contemporary Music Ensemble invites students to perform some of the most unique, eclectic, fascinating, and provocative music written over the past 50 years. Students will study, learn, and perform a wide range of styles that may include rock, jazz, hip-hop, crossover, and electronic dance music. Singers, instrumentalists, and people who play live electronics using computers and other electronic devices are encouraged to participate. Music 101 or equivalent knowledge of music notation and score reading are strongly recommended. An audition is required. (ART)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 113
Introduction to World Music
A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies. (GLB1)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 119
Musical Theater Production
Participants in departmental musical theater productions will be enrolled for 0.50 credit by the Music Department and will be graded. (ART)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 121
Listen!
This course is intended for students who love listening to a range of music but who have had little or no formal instruction. Although rooted in classical music and its traditions, the course also explores other genres, including popular song, jazz standards, blues, rock and roll, and hip-hop. We will attend concerts on campus and in Hartford, and we will develop the language to talk knowledgeably about the music in our daily lives. Most importantly, we will do exactly what the title says: we will listen to a lot of music! (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 123
Future Horizons in Music
This course is designed to operate in the spirit of crowdsourcing, with students engaged in a conversation over the possible future of music post COVID-19. Primarily, the role that traditional institutions, such as live concert venues, the opera, the dance club, the symphony orchestra, music theater, and that of choral music, may retain in a society that appears to be undergoing significant change. We will search for emerging musical trends from any style or genre, share sample videos or recordings, and provide documentation to open a discussion over each example. There will be weekly listening and reading assignments, and students will be uploading short media projects to sites such as Youtube and Soundcloud. Weekly remote meetings (on Zoom or Skype, for example) may be provided (ART)
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 133
Blues Women to Nicki Minaj
This course explores the music of black American women in music fro the era of blues queens of the 1920s through Nicki Minaj. Along the way we will listen to and read about the music of blues greats Ma Rainey and Bessie smith; trailblazer Marian Anderson; jazz legends Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and Dinah Washington; Motown superstar Dina Ross and the fabulous Supremes; disco queen Donna summer; gospel and sould diva Aretha Franklin; rocker Tina Turner; and, ultimately, women in hip-hop, among them Queen Latifa, Lil Kim, and Nicki Minaj. Because context is critical to understanding of the music of these women, course readings will situate the women in their social and musical times. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 150
Before Lady Gaga and Beyoncé
A broad survey of the music and music-making traditions of European and North American women from antiquity to the present. We explore the work and lives of women active as composers and performers in a range of genres, including the classical traditions, blues, jazz, and hip hop. No previous training or experience in music is required. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 173
Sonic Arts
This course will focus on sound as material, concentrating on approaches that engage with sound outside of traditional musical practices. Topics addressed will include site-specific audio installation, sound walks, broadcast arts, and acoustic ecology. Regular readings and discussions will be combined with listening sessions and student projects. The goal of this course is to provide practical skills in contemporary sound creation and production, while providing necessary historical and theoretical context. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 175
Introduction to Recording Arts
This is a course in the basics of recording and producing music. Students learn to use the basic tools of the production studio, including an exploration of recording techniques and standard practices encountered at professional facilities. The course also incorporates connections between listening to professional recordings and making technical decisions when capturing a musical performance. (ART)
1.00 units, Studio
MUSC 200
Composition
Individual projects in free composition, with emphasis on acquiring and developing techniques of musical form and balance. When possible, student compositions will be performed. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 201
Diatonic Harmonic Practice
Study of the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, through exercises and the analysis of typical works. An intensive course with integrated practicum sessions, which focus on the development of skills in sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard proficiency, and written exercises modeled after those works. Simultaneous enrollment in the one-hour practicum is required. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or equivalent preparation.
1.50 units, Seminar
MUSC 202
Chromatic Harmonic Practice
Further study of the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries, through exercises and the analysis of typical works. Weekly practicum sessions focus on the consolidation of skills in sight singing, dictation, and keyboard proficiency. Simultaneous enrollment in the one-hour practicum is required. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 201 or permission of instructor.
1.25 units, Lecture
MUSC 207
Conducting and Orchestration
Introduction to choral and orchestral conducting, supplemented by both practical and theoretical exercises in orchestration. Ability to read music is essential; background in music theory, though helpful, is not necessary. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (ART)
1.00 units, Studio
MUSC 212
Experimental and Advanced Music Improvisation
This is a performance and music creation course, devoted to the exploration of music improvisation, ranging from fully structured and notated, to free and experimental. All instrumentalists and vocalists are welcome, as well as those interested in electronic and computer music. While music reading and theory skills are not strictly required, a certain level of playing or singing proficiency will be expected. The course will lead to an end of semester public performance. (ART)
0.50 units, Studio
MUSC 218
American Popular Music
A broad survey of popular music in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. We will explore blackface minstrelsy, the music of Tin Pan Alley, ragtime and big band jazz, early blues and country music, post-war pop singers, the evolution of rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul, folk music, alternative music, hip-hop, and MTV and the popular mainstream. Themes of music and identity, multi- cultural sources, the business of music, and the influence of technology will be followed throughout the course. No previous background in music is required. Also listed in American Studies. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 219
Toca Brasil! (Play Brazil!)
A comprehensive, interactive exploration of Brazilian music, this course will present an integrated approach through hands-on performance of Brazilian percussion music, combined with academic study of Afro-Brazilian culture, religion, and dance. Beginning with an overview of traditional Brazilian forms of musical expression, we will then analyze how these forms were incorporated into popular musical styles from the 1960s to the present. In recent years, fusions of new styles derived from traditional Brazilian and non-Brazilian music have emerged that reflect contemporary processes of globalization. The multi-faceted approach to be integrated into this course will include hands-on musical performance, readings, and audio/video recordings. No previous experience in music is required. Also listed under International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies. (GLB1)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 220
Music and Human Rights
This course highlights the role of music in relation to human rights throughout the world. Material to be covered includes theoretical approaches towards the study of human rights and how music can serve as an important indicator of diverse social relationships in various contexts. It will also compare and contrast historical and cultural aspects of musical movements that were strongly connected to human rights in countries and regions such as Latin America, the Caribbean, the United States, South Korea, and South Africa. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 222
Investigating Music and Culture
This course is an in-depth introduction to the study of music and culture. This course will focus on the gathering of primary-source materials and relate them to broader historical and cultural contexts. Through this process, students will develop interviewing techniques, learn how to document with video and audio recording equipment, and practice incorporating data into comprehensive research projects. Students will develop these techniques through participation with a Hartford-based arts organization. Also listed under Anthropology. (ART)
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 225
MIDI & Computer Music Production Techniques
This course explores the skills and techniques necessary to build a foundation in the study of electronic, and computer music production. Topics include rhythm programming, sound design, sampling, processing, basic music theory, and basic audio engineering. By the end of the course, students will possess the tools needed to compose a full-length electronic music production. While the course will be taught primarily in Logic X, techniques covered will be applicable across all DAWs. It is required that students who enroll in this course have a computer, and access to a digital audio workstation (DAW) to use in the course. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 175, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 234
Music as Protest
This course examines the ways in which social and political issues are expressed in music. We will look at music that was written, composed, and performed in Paris, Harlem, and Hartford in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and explore the ramifications of the social and political issues for the music. Topics to be covered include: the music of the French Revolution; music of urban black America, 1960 to the present; Hector Berlioz, Ludwig van Beethoven, Claude Debussy, and “protests” in classical music. No previous experience in music is required. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 248
The Psychology of Music
A broad survey of human responses to music, from the physics and psychophysics of how we perceive musical sounds to the question of how and why music is emotionally powerful. Through reading from the primary literature in both music and psychology, students will develop an understanding of the cognitive processes by which we understand music; musical meaning and the formation of musical taste; the social and cultural factors that influence musical preferences; and the similarities and differences in music across cultures. Students MUST have the ability to read music. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 249
Music Therapy Principles and Practices
An introduction to the principles and current practices of music therapy, with emphasis on the broadly interdisciplinary nature of the field. Topics explored include music itself, and music interwoven with studies in movement, psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, ethics, human development, ability, and disability. Seminar format emphasizes student engagement and responsibility. Reading, writing, discussion, and evaluation of research, and an experiential component each week offer a variety of modes of engaging with key topics in the field. (ART)
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 252
The Beatles and ‘60s Rock ‘n’ Roll
The Beatles were at the center of a revolution in rock ’n’ roll in the 1960s, affecting music in the US and around the world. This course will explore the enormous changes in rock music in that decade, seeking to understand them both musically and in terms of the important political and social changes that defined the 1960s. Our focus will combine detailed, critical listening (to musicians including Bob Dylan, the Beach Boys, the Byrds, the Supremes, and many others) with exploration of the numerous connections between the music and the rapidly changing society in which it was produced. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 260
Advanced Recording Arts
Building on the knowledge and techniques learned in MUSC-175 Introduction to Recording Arts, students will engage in recording projects of multiple musical genres. This class will incorporate more advanced recording and mixing philosophies and will continue development of technical critical listening skills in a studio environment. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 175, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Studio
MUSC 264
Mozart and 18th-Century Music
An introduction to the life and music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). The course will also examine other composers of Mozart’s time, and consider the relationship between Mozart’s music and the main themes of Enlightenment thought in the 18th century. No previous training in music is required. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 268
Mozart and Beethoven
"Wolfgang Amadè Mozart (1756-91) and Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) are two of the greatest and most famous composers in Western music. They also stand at a major turning point in music history, representing a shift from “music as entertainment” to “music as profoundly personal expression."" By investigating the lives, careers, and music of these two extraordinary figures, we will also explore this important cultural shift and its consequences for later music. This is an introductory course; there are no prerequisites, and students do not need to read music. It is a listening course, and students should expect to do several hours of listening each week (in addition to assigned readings and occasional video screenings). We will also attend live concerts of Mozart’s and Beethoven’s music." (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 270
Synthesis and Sound Design
This course explores various methods of audio sound design and creation through several synthesis methods, and through creative recording and audio manipulation techniques. Students will learn about the building blocks of synthesis, from oscillator to output, and how these components interact to create certain timbres, via hands-on experimentation, demonstrations, in-class assignments, and creative projects. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 175, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 271
Sound for Film
This course provides students with the tools and skills necessary to create a full audio mix synchronized to video or other media. Exploration of production dialogue, ADR (Automatic Dialogue Replacement), Foley, sound effects, sync, and basic music editing will be accomplished through critical listening, hands-on labs, and student projects. Additionally, students will examine delivery methods, basic video format specifications, and a brief history of sound in film. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 274
Jazz: 1900 to the Present
Through listening, discussion, and reading, this course will survey the development of jazz from ragtime and pre-jazz through New Orleans swing, be-bop, and modern jazz. Among composers and performers to be studied include Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Scott Joplin, Thelonious Monk, Charles Parker, and Woody Shaw. No previous training in music is required. Also listed under American Studies. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 275
The Business of Music
The music business is a changing and dynamic concept, ranging from individual entrepreneurs to multinational conglomerates. It encompasses single performances, tours, publishing and recording, promotion, management, and legal issues. This course will introduce you to an overview of the recording and music industry through a variety of hands-on projects. Since digital technologies have dramatically transformed music production, distribution, and consumption, this course will explore legal, technical, financial, and social issues of the music business. (ART)
1.00 units, Lecture
MUSC 290
Brazil in 3-D!
This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the music and culture of Afro-Brazilian traditions through performance process immersion in three sites within Brazil. Beginning in Salvador da Bahia, students will participate in drumming and movement workshops that may include capoeira (martial art/dance/game), candomblé (religious music), and samba reggae (a regional adaptation of samba drumming). The next site will be the state of Minas Gerais ("General Mines") where we will explore the Congado Mineiro, a religious drumming processional music, and more recent adaptations of this tradition, with the Meninos de Minas, a youth drumming project based on the rhythms of the Congado Mineiro. This site will include visits to the city of Itabira, and a visit to a quilombo (a village that was founded by Afro Brazilians following the abolition of slavery in the late 1800s). The final stop will be a visit to Rio de Janeiro, where students will explore Brazilian samba drumming traditions, including a workshop with members of the top-level Salgueiro samba school, and the Cidade de Samba, where the carnival parade floats are constructed by several groups. Other musical traditions to be explored in Rio will include pagode and other forms of Afro-Brazilian music and dance. Preference will be afforded to students who have performance experience in courses such as the Samba Ensemble (MUSC 111) and Toca Brasil! (MUSC 219). (GLB1)
0.50 units, Seminar
MUSC 311
Music from Plato through Bach
This course explores music from the time of Plato and Aristotle through Baroque composers Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. We will consider the most significant traditions, trends, genres, innovations, and historical developments in the history of music in Europe as we discover, listen to, and write about key works by composers whose music is the cornerstone for much of today's music. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 312
18th - and 19th-Century Music: From Mozart to Brahms
A study of European and American art music from the mid-1700s to the turn of the 20th century, focusing on the greatest composers of the era in their historical, political, and social contexts. Composers studied will include Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Rossini, Chopin, Liszt, Berlioz, Wagner, Verdi, Tchaikovsky, and Brahms. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 201 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 313
20th - and 21st-Century Music: From Stravinsky to John Adams
A study of contemporary art music from the late-1890s to the present, focusing on the greatest composers of the era in their historical, political, and social contexts. Composers studied will include Mahler, Debussy, Stravinsky, Bartók, Schoenberg, Shostakovich, Ives, Copland, Gershwin, Ellington, Bernstein, Reich, and Adams. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 201 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 328
Organ Literature and History
Knighted "the king of instruments" by Mozart, the pipe organ is one of the oldest and most complex of all musical instruments. This course will provide an overview of the development of the instrument itself and its repertoire, ranging from the organ's medieval origins through the present day. We will listen to recordings of music from every major period and national school of organ literature, as well as attend live performances and visit historic instruments in Connecticut. The course will culminate in a final performance and research project. (ART)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or equivalent preparation.
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 399
Independent Study: Composition
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
MUSC 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
MUSC 400
Senior Project Tutorial and Colloquium
A Senior Project is required of all music majors. The Senior Project may emphasize performance or research. It may be a recital, creative project, or thesis. This course is a seminar to develop senior research and/or performance projects. Students will develop research skills and participate in a colloquium series featuring research by the faculty of the Department of Music. (ART)
Enrollment limited to Music majors or Music minors.
1.00 units, Seminar
MUSC 407
Senior Recital
The preparation and presentation of a full-length program. Enrollment is subject to the approval of the Music faculty. Interested students must meet with the department chairperson and obtain a copy of the senior recital guidelines in the spring semester of the junior year if planning a recital for the senior year. The course is open to both majors and non-majors. If the student is concurrently enrolled in Music 107 Music Lessons for 0.5 credit, then the senior recital will count for 0.5 credit. Submission of an independent study form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the department chair, are required for enrollment. (ART)
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
MUSC 415
Special Studies in Music
Individual or group study and research on a selected topic under the guidance of a member of the Music faculty. Permission is granted only to advanced students. Submission of a completed independent study form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. (ART)
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
MUSC 418
Senior Project
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. (ART)
1.00 units, Independent Study
MUSC 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
MUSC 497
Senior Thesis
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
MUSC 498
Senior Thesis Part 1
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2.00 units, Independent Study
MUSC 499
Senior Thesis Part 2
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2.00 units, Independent Study